3rd Grade Addition
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IMG_0536.JPG (240x320 pixels)

IMG_0536.JPG (240x320 pixels) | 3rd Grade Addition | Scoop.it
Eunmi Yang's insight:

I think that this would be a fun math game for a center where the students can practice addition/composing numbers. My classroom with my mentor right now does not have many centers and I am so glad to find this resource because I can introduce it to my mentor and my students. This is such an engaging and game-like game/practice that the students can practice their understanding more with. While I was looking at the website, I also noticed that there was a tray with single digit numbers and I really liked that idea because then the students can choose based on what they are comfortable with and practice adding. I also think that this game/activity will be very engaging because the students will be very excited to use it and add the numbers. With this, I would have a sheet that the students will need to fill out and hand in so that I know that they are actually adding the numbers rather than just throwing a ball around. In addition, I would be able to use the worksheets that the students use as a method to learn more about my students' strengths and weaknesses. By learning about my students' needs, then I can recommend or plan lesson according to them so that they will grow and build upon their previous understandings/knowledge.

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spider-math-238x300.jpg (238x300 pixels)

spider-math-238x300.jpg (238x300 pixels) | 3rd Grade Addition | Scoop.it
Eunmi Yang's insight:

I love this math activity in which elementary school students can engage in. This math activity is originally for pre-school students or kindergarten students, but I think this can be changed a little bit to accommodate the 3rd grade curriculum standards. I like this activity because the students are able to see how there are many addition equations that have the same sum. For example, my 3rd grade students can do this activity with a larger number such as 50 or 100. I'm not sure if I would have the students use the cheerios (manipulative) on the actual activity sheet, but if the number is large, I can have an extra white sheet in which the students can use the cheerios on to figure out the possibilities. I also really like this activity because it helps the students to see that there isn't just one way to get an answer, but that there are multiple equations that end up with the same answer. In addition, the students can use all kinds of math strategies such as addition, multiplication, subtraction, and division. Through this method, the students can see the relationships between each math strategy. I love that there are many methods that I can use and that I can make small changes to this activity to help the students practice math and meet their needs. I also love that the students are provided with cheerios/manipulatives because visuals/manipulatives really help all different types of learners and especially ESOL students.

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5469a00c82a909b17c079d5d0d996188.jpg (267x320 pixels)

5469a00c82a909b17c079d5d0d996188.jpg (267x320 pixels) | 3rd Grade Addition | Scoop.it
Eunmi Yang's insight:

This is an image that I found from Pinterest when I was just looking through various math activities that I can use with my students in my classroom. I thought that this would be a good math activity that the students can engage in to use their learned math strategies/knowledge such as addition, to write a word problem that has an answer of the number that I presented to them. This is also a great activity because it requires the students to work backwords and the students to engage in more deeper thinking compared to when they are just solving an addition or multiplication problem. For my 3rd grade class, I would use a larger number than 9 such as 48 because 9 would be too easy for them. I also really like this math activity/ warm-up because it is open ended and the students can have multiple exit points and the activity can be used to engage the students in meaningful discussion. I can ask questions about how the students got their word problems and how each of the word problems are related to one another. I also liked that the students don't have to use addition and they can use any strategy to produce a problem such as multiplication or division. I hope to use this activity in my 3rd grade class or in the future with my own class students.

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Rescooped by Eunmi Yang from First Grade Unit 5- Operations & Algebraic Thinking
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Composing & Decomposing Numbers with Base Ten Pieces

Here's a preview of a great teaching and learning tool from my TPT Store. http:--www.teacherspayteachers.com-Store-Karen-Harris-1 The concept of Composing an...

Via Sonya Tokerud Hoelscher
Eunmi Yang's insight:

This video shows a powerpoint with visuals that can help the students understand composing and decomposing numbers. The video shows a visual representation of the number and then shows how tens are composed and why they are composed when a number is added to it. I believe that this is an effective way of teaching because the students are able to see what is really happening when they are composing numbers and so they are able to understand why something happens when they are using the algorithm method. This video is kind of like the base ten method that I used when I was teaching composing to my 3rd graders and I think that this is a great lesson to also have in addition to the base ten method lesson.

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Place%20value%20practice%20sheet.pdf

Eunmi Yang's insight:

I really like this worksheet because it helps the student learn about what the numbers really represent. I believe that this will help the students to add and compose numbers because the students will have a better understanding of place value and what the digits actually represent and mean. I hope to use this type of activity before I introduce composing and addition to the students. I also really like that the worksheet has a column for the picture that represents the number because I believe that visuals are really helpful for all students, especially for the ESOL students in my classroom.

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counting-with-tally-marks-4-350x350.jpg (350x350 pixels)

counting-with-tally-marks-4-350x350.jpg (350x350 pixels) | 3rd Grade Addition | Scoop.it
Eunmi Yang's insight:

In my 3rd grade class, we used the base ten method to show what composing really meant rather than just teaching the students to "regroup" (compose). The base ten method helped the students really understand the steps they were making because they saw the visuals of how ten was added to the tens place and so on. When I was in elementary school, I just learned the algorithm and I didn't really understand why a 1 or 2 was added to the tens place or so on. I understood why I was actually doing that later on. So, I really believe that the base tens method or this activity helps the students to understand the why of what they are doing when solving addition/subtraction problems.  So, I really like this math activity in which the students have the toothpicks to see the value of the numbers. This activity is for subtraction, but I can use it for addition too to help the 3rd graders understand what and how they are adding.I also love that this activity also utilizes manipulatives because then the students have a visual that helps them (especially the ESOL students). I hope to use this in my 3rd grade class or in the future as a teacher.

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