Ms. Postlethwaite...
Follow
Find tag "population"
1.6K views | +0 today
Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

 

Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, April 9, 6:44 PM

Challenges the ideas about the impacts of declining birth rates across the world. Contains interesting graphs of changing Fertility rates from 1950 for the highest and lowest GDP nations. Relevant to Population Geography. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:18 PM

The dwindling birth rates may be seen as negative to some in a sense of power insecurities, but the reality is that it is great for economic growth and prevents population issues. With high birth rates, movement tends to be higher towards immigration while low birth rates mainly have movement towards urban spaces.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Should we be worried?


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Exploring the Paradox of U.S. Hispanics' Longer Life Expectancy - Population Reference Bureau

Despite having lower income and education levels, U.S. Hispanics tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years. Demographers call this the

Via Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:41 PM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 21, 9:14 PM
Unit 2 population and migration
This article explains the u.s. population change and how it's birth rate is lowering. In America the CDR was officially greater than the CBR for the first time ever. This was specifically for white people though. This article is a good example of a developed country entering stage 5 on the DTM.
This article relates unit 2 because it shows how the population in America is declining as a nation. This also proves how migration is what is sustaining the American population. The Crude death rate is finally higher than births on an odd occasion meaning America is entering stage 5 of the DTM.
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

Hans Rosling: Religions and babies | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? Speaking at the TEDxSummit in Doha, Qatar, he graphs data over time and across religions.
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 10, 6:28 PM

An entire continent and only 2% of the population is living in the yellow? That's insane! If needed would the population be able to survive in yellow if they accommodated the people with shelter, water, and a means of survival? I think I personally would want maybe a "summer" house in the yellow to get away from everyone and everything once in awhile. It would be like going to the countryside!

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 11:20 AM

While Australia may large in area, little of that land can actually be inhabited. Since populations are often tied to precipitation and therefore agricultural potential, the "Outback" of Australia is not suitable for large populations. Unforgiving desert climates mixed with rough terrain cannot provide appropriate food growth, therefore limiting population growth. On the other hand, much of the coast contains ample enough rainfall as well as soil quality in order to produce food. Also, the allocation of major cities near the coasts have allowed for increased development due to trade, transportation, and tourism.  

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 16, 9:52 PM

This image shows that geography can greatly affect where a population settles and is concentrated.  Living along the coast provides many benefits and resources for those who live there.  Heavy rainfall and other dangerous biogeographic factors keep people from settling in the yellow area of the continent. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography Resources
Scoop.it!

Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home

Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The number is on the rise.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
Kenneth Jordan's comment, September 3, 2013 11:21 PM
This shows how culturally diverse we are as a country. with more than 60 million people speaking another language besides English is in my opinion, interesting. It also means that these people will be able to share their culture with the ones around them.
Rainer Emily's curator insight, October 1, 2013 11:37 AM

Intellectual/arts?

 

This article is on intellectual and arts because its about how people aren't speaking English at home. The article is talking about how people wont speak English and stuff and thats intellectual. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 3:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Population Density

Population Density | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon, Allison Anthony
more...
Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Elderly Spur Japan Stores

Elderly Spur Japan Stores | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Unicharm Corp.’s sales of adult diapers in Japan exceeded those for babies for the first time last year. At Daiei Inc. supermarkets, customers can feel Japan aging -- literally: It has made shopping carts lighter.


Japan's demographic shifts are well-chronicled: the Japanese are having fewer children and the improvements in healthcare mean that the elderly are living longer than ever.  Combined this means that Japan's population pyramid is getting "top heavy."  This population change is having huge econmic impacts as the percentage of Japanese people is now over 23%.  Retailers and industries are heavily targeting this expanding demographic with financial clout that outspends all other cohorts.


Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography @ Hermitage High School - Ms. Anthony
Scoop.it!

China Think Tank Urges Government to End One Child Policy

China Think Tank Urges Government to End One Child Policy | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

BEIJING (AP) — A government think tank is urging Chinese leaders to start phasing out China's one-child policy immediately and allow two children for every family by 2015, a daring proposal to do away with the unpopular policy.

 

In a move to correct some of the problems created by this policy, there is consideration suggested to move in this direction to alleviate the gender gap.  But will it take too long before these kinds of measures will create results?


Via Allison Anthony
more...
Michael Crumpton's comment, November 12, 2012 1:28 PM
If they did do away with it would be both a good and a very, very bad thing. It would be good because it would be a major hit for the peoples rights. But it would be bad due to the explosive population consequences