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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2014 12:03 PM

This is an intriguing article that explores the difficulties of forced migrations that arise from civil war, but it also looks at city planning as refugee camps are established to make homes for the displaced.  These camps have become into de-facto cities. The maps, videos and photographs embedded in the article show the rapid development of these insta-cities which organically have evolved to fit the needs of incoming refugees.  Size not investing in permanent infrastructure has some serious social, sanitation and financial cost, there are some efforts to add structure to the chaos, to formalize the informal.  Truly this is a fascinating case study of in urban geography as we are increasingly living on what Mike Davis refers to as a "Planet of Slums."  


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities. 

Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 2014 11:06 AM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:02 PM

APHG-U4

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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:10 PM

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:45 PM

What urban model is this?

Demitre Athwal's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:06 AM

The other city that never sleeps

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The Permanence of Geography

The Permanence of Geography | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The current rise or durability of the economies of the Global South do not signal that economic geography does not matter, but that current investment has simply shifted.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2013 12:23 PM

In an era where globalization has rendered distances a minor barrier to diffusion, some have erroneously concluded that geography is no longer relevant to economic development and urban planning.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, but that doesn't mean that the 'old rules' of space and place aren't be re-written.  This is a nice article that discusses the continued importance of spatial thinking and geography for urban planning.


Tags: urban, planning economic, urbanism, globalization, unit 7 cities.

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Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

 

This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tags:  density, urban, spatial, planning, TED. 


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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City?

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project.


"Hsiang and Mendis have increasingly come to believe that the only way to study and plan for our urban planet is to conceptualize its entire population in one seamless landscape – to picture 7 billion of us as if we all lived in a single, massive city."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:54 PM

I was very exited by the work being done by Bimal Mendis and Joyce Hsiang.  I hear to much on the news and in conversation about over population, energy shortages and brutal living conditions.  Creating a digital interactive medium is the most efficient way to educate the internet consuming public about issues and developments all over the world.  It reminds me of the blue marble picture taken from Apollo 17, the first full color image of our planet.  This image is considered to be the defining moment that awoke the conservation movement and understanding that the earth is our home and should be treated as such.  I cant help hoping a program like “the city of seven billion” will help people to relies we are all one species and from that develop a move beneficial way of coexisting.

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.


This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tags:  density, urban, spatial, planning, TED. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


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