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'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 26, 7:31 AM

The pre-Columbian symbols of the condor, serpent and Tree of Life adorn the architecture of these brightly colored ballrooms that also have European-imported chandeliers, arches and other baroque elements.  The spread of globalization is often assumed to be a homogenizing cultural force, but local cultures typically take elements of the global, and make it their own.  The global becomes local and deeply rooted in place and reshapes place.


Tags globalizationarchitecture, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, May 27, 6:10 AM

Nový architektonický štýl?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

The resurgence of old-style architecture in developed places is shown in this article. The New-Andean style of architecture showcases bright colors and traditional patterns of the natives in South America is gaining popularity once again. Old styles of living and architecture had been fading for many years, but are now coming back into popularity after many Native groups have revived their traditional cultures and ways of life. 

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:13 AM

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:27 AM

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 6:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 1:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 9:14 AM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 2:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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The "Seinfeld of Saudi Arabia"

"[This video] explores the idea Western “cultural invasion” into Saudi Arabia, and satirizes Saudi views of America in the process. The influence of Western, particularly American, culture is a big, touchy topic in much of the world, with people torn between their love of Michael Jackson and their desire to patronize compatriots over foreigners. It’s about national pride and about preserving one’s own culture.  For English captions (click the little 'CC' button in the bottom-right corner after pressing play).

 

Skip to about 3:15 to see the segment on the Western 'cultural invasion' of Saudi Arabia and, appropriately, a very funny bit on attempting a 'reverse cultural invasion' of Saudi cultural in America."

--Max Fisher in the Washington Post


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 3:39 PM

well, we all need a good laugh in the troubled world we live in.

Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 6:42 PM
Throughout the world, American pop culture is what defines us, and it is definitely what we use to define ourselves, as well. When we look to other countries, we look to see what their popular culture is like and compare it to our own. I love this video because I think that it is poking fun at both American popular culture and Saudi culture. Where American pop culture is so large and all encompassing, Saudi pop culture is small and not nearly as significant in defining its people.
When we, as Americans, see Saudi Arabians, we see a repressed culture, but just because they don’t have the pop culture that we have, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have a distinct identity. Obviously the Saudis have a distinct identity, and obviously they aren’t afraid to poke fun at what Americans think of their culture.
Peter Siner's comment, April 30, 2013 6:29 AM
It seems as though throughout history there have always been tendencies for the Middle East to fall under a westernized mindset. Organizations and rulers throughout Middle Eastern history had challenged this idea. However, especially in todays society we are seeing a shift where the people of the middle east are becoming more and more accepting of westernized practices. The biggest hump however seems to be overcoming the religious boundaries that tie down the Middle East to its traditional ways. This process of westernization is not one that can be completed over night and it will most certainly be a very slow process that takes the time and effort of the people to make it happen. We are already seeing popular westernized culture integrate with the traditional culture of the middle east. With time, it is almost inevitable for the views of the western world to completely influence the people especially since the younger generations are so willing to change.
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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 2:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2013 11:03 AM

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 


Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 30, 2013 12:09 PM

This is a great map showing the spread of the Muslim Brotherhood across the Middle East and North Africa. It shows those countries who do like it, and those who do not. The reasons for which a country either likes or dislikes them gives insight into the culture and government of that country, and this map can give some insight into the future influences of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...


The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?


Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 11:27 AM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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GPS technology maps land rights for Africa's 'forest people'

GPS technology maps land rights for Africa's 'forest people' | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
In the lush rainforests of Africa's Congo Basin, hundreds of thousands of indigenous people live as hunter gatherers, depending on the forest's natural resources for their survival.

 

The "Mapping for Rights" program trains people in the Congo to map the land they live on using GPS and other geospatial technologies.  This can assist the to produce documents to politically protect their land from encroachment and preserve their access to the forest.  Globalization can blur many of the modern/traditional narratives as the world becomes interconnected in complex ways.     


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'Geographical Oddity'

Partly just because I love this highly quotable movie with an incredible soundtrack, but this short clip can start be a good conversation starter.  I'm hoping to use it when discussing relative location (or isolation) as well as the space-time compression.  I ask my student how far away they live from campus and invariably they answer with a unit of time (even though distance was implied in the question).  Why answer with time when discussing distance?  What technologies are dependent on our temporal analysis of distance? How would our perception of distance change based on our access to transportation and communication technologies?       


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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:32 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:06 AM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:18 AM

This comedian sure does his best job at showing that the Middle East is not the chaotic war zone we see on American television every day, and what a better place to do it in than Qatar, a place where he would have a very diverse audience.  He made light of each race in the audience, drawing laughs instead of slander. He made jokes about Lebanese, Qataris, Saudis, and Iranians, amongst others.  This really broke many of the stereotypes that exist about people of Middle Eastern descent in our society. Instead of seeing them protesting or fighting amongst themselves, we see them enjoying each other’s company just as every race in America does every day.  

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 8:45 AM

This comedian is very funny and he is right middle easterners are not seen t be funny in western media.  It is important to see that everyone like to laugh and that we are all the same.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:20 PM

This is actual comical. Learning can be boring to some people while learning in fun ways can be awesome. He uses funny ways of telling people what to do and not to do and it works for the crowd.

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 2:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:16 AM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:41 AM

This is fascinating to me

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 8:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 2:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Dandies in Congo, emos in Iraq, electro-hillbilly truckers in Japan. No matter how hard life can be, people carve out original ways of living.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 8:13 AM
Geography has never been one of my best subjects. That’s why I chose your board to follow. I must say you have interesting scoops. I have not been disappointed. You have a great learning center here. Keep scooping!
Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 8:20 AM
P.S. The guy in the top photo reminded me of my dad. He was always a sharp-dressed man! :)
John Dyhouse's comment, February 25, 2013 8:35 AM
Interesting cultures showing that people have a need to identify with their peers to be one step ahead of the crowd, I guess
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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

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Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 6:44 AM
This is an interesting TED talk that centers on the integration of western culture with Arab culture. The Arab pop culture is very different from what I thought that it would be. It takes hard work to produce a culture that is modern yet still centers on Islamic foundation, but is seems like the Arab world has put in the work. The new culture is significant because that means that the people in the Arab world know what pop culture is and why it is important. The speaker says that the culture is a mesh of the old and new. She does not call it a mash or clash because there are certain parts that are being used from the West, such as superheroes and music videos, but the overall culture is centered on Islam. The people in the Middle East still learn about Islamic ideas and thought, but now get to learn about the subjects with superheroes. This is relevant in modern times and even in my life because as a Christian, I try to find movies, music, and entertainment that is different from the world. It is also hard for me to do so because there is a lot of nonsense out in the world that is portrayed as being normal.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:01 PM

Religion plays a huge role in the Arab world and although times are changung they are trying to stay true to their culture. Sherren el feki says that meshing of civilization is important.  Taking popular culture and meshing it with culture will be successful. For instance the comic book 99, fitst Islam superhero. The 99 I to represent the 99 attributes. The 99 superheroes will hopefully join forces with Americas superman,etc. it is not meant to be a clash but to  mix the different cultures in both ancient in modern ways. 

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

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Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico

Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
MEXICO CITY — Juan Chiu Trujillo was 5 years old when he left his native Mexico for a visit to his father's hometown in southern China. He was 35 when he returned.


Migratory patterns and globalization can lead to some intriguing cultural blends that would seem improbable 100 years ago. This story of shows vividly how ethnicity does NOT always correspond to culture.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:17 AM

What a journey that must have been, to not return to your country for 30 years after going on vacation. Apart from the personal story in the article, the notion of ethnic groups that we practical never hear of is really interesting. While it makes sense that there were Chinese people in Mexico, it's just something which I never actively realized. There should be a  book of ethnic conflicts which never make the well-known history books, if there isn't one already.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 

 

Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 30, 2013 12:09 PM

This is a great map showing the spread of the Muslim Brotherhood across the Middle East and North Africa. It shows those countries who do like it, and those who do not. The reasons for which a country either likes or dislikes them gives insight into the culture and government of that country, and this map can give some insight into the future influences of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.

 

Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 7:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 5:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

Scooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite
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Religion, Gender and Public Space

These three issues are deeply interconnected in many parts of the world and in this news report from Israel, ultra-Orthodox from the town of Beit Shemesh are seeking to enforce their vision of a religiously appropriated gendered partition of space.  This particular news clip has caused a firestorm, and the Israeli PM has publicly states that gender segregation will not be tolerated.   

 

On Monday, as the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported, "about 300 ultra-Orthodox men attacked police officers, hurling stones at the officers after they removed a sign ordering women not to walk past a synagogue in Beit Shemesh."  Obviously they are not indicative of all Jews, but this raises many questions.  Why do we see a rise in of religious extremism (a loaded word, but I'll listen to alternatives) in this era of globalization?  Why is equality in where and how people can act in public such an important political freedom?  Why is there such strong cultural reactions to diverse gender norms in public?      

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:45 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the intricate web of cutlure in religion and how different aspects of the country or adherent is affected or affects the religion.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it talks about religions affecting behaviors. This also relates to the book "Half the sky" and the obstacle of gender inequality.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This relates to the section by talking about religion, and gender inequality, and how many people do not want women to go against their cultural and religious beliefs.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it talks about how religion affects the behaviors of people as they go about practicing their religions. Their particular religions influence their political beliefs and other parts of their daily lives.

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals

NPR: Saudi Women Drive Change Despite Mixed Signals | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Authorities continue to go after women who flout Saudi Arabia's ban on female drivers, but King Abdullah has pledged to give women more political power in the coming years.

 

This article focuses on public space and differentiated cultural norms that created deeply gendered spaces that are onerous to navigate. Gender, Place and Culture are all intertwined.   


Via Seth Dixon
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