Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Eritrea's National Soccer Team, the World Leader in Defections

Eritrea's National Soccer Team, the World Leader in Defections | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Eritrea's soccer players regularly use overseas matches to flee their country
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With Memories And Online Maps, A Man Finds His 'Way Home'

With Memories And Online Maps, A Man Finds His 'Way Home' | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
When Saroo Brierley was 4, he hopped on the wrong train in rural India, losing his way and his family. But as he recounts in A Long Way Home, Google Earth helped him return decades later.
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Caution: Elves

Caution: Elves | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

Notice the link between the landscape and culture...

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Young Russians never knew the Soviet Union, but they hope to recapture days of its empire

Young Russians never knew the Soviet Union, but they hope to recapture days of its empire | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Russian youth have no memory of the Soviet Union, but some feel nostalgic for the days of empire
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What Is Your Race? For Millions Of Americans, A Shifting Answer

What Is Your Race? For Millions Of Americans, A Shifting Answer | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

There's been a lot of talk about the millions of Latinos who changed their racial identification during the last census. But researchers said Latinos were not the only ones switching and it's not new.


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Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup

Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Argentina and England are unlikely to meet at the World Cup finals, however their rivalry was reignited at the weekend when the Argentine national side posed behind a banner claiming the Falkland Islands belong to the South American country. Ahead of their warm-up match with Slovenia in Buenos Aires, the team displayed the message in support of the country's claims over the sovereignty of the islands in the South Atlantic, which are a British Overseas Territory.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 10, 2014 3:25 PM

The World Cup can make things interesting when nationalistic fervor becomes politicized and moves to issues off the pitch.  Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  Like Gibraltar, the Falklands are British Oversees Territories, ones that Margaret Thatcher was willing to fight Agrentina to maintain;  Argentina still claims Las Malvinas as their territory.  For a great teaching resource on this issue, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE 2013 (sign up to attend NCGE 2014 here).  


Tags: Argentinasport, bordersgeopolitics, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:17 PM

Sempre a geopolítica...  Malvinas.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting for me, because I am a student in Geography 200, but I also love soccer, and the English National Team is one of my favorite sides.  I think it is interesting how in the World Cup, the Argentines took an opportunity of being on the world stage to claim that the Falkland Islands, or the "Las Malvinas", belong to their country and not their bitter soccer enemy, England.  I think that had this banner been displayed before and England v Argentina final, the game would have had an explosive atmosphere, especially since the Argentines are also rivals of Brazil.  I think it is interesting how geo-political issues can play themselves out on the pitch of the "beautiful game".  This fact shows that soccer is indeed the "World's Game".  As I stated before, I would have loved to see the passion this would have inspired before an England-Argentina game.  To this day, England prefers Portugal over Argentina in soccer, probably because of their checkered history.

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China Building Dubai-Style Fake Islands in South China Sea

China Building Dubai-Style Fake Islands in South China Sea | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Sand, cement, wood and steel are the latest tools in China’s territorial arsenal as it seeks to literally reshape the South China Sea.
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Lego to launch female scientists series after online campaign

Lego to launch female scientists series after online campaign | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Science-themed project was submitted to Lego Ideas by Dr Ellen Kooijman, who recognized a gender gap in toy sets
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Declassified U.N. Cables Reveal Turning Point in Rwanda Crisis of 1994

Declassified U.N. Cables Reveal Turning Point in Rwanda Crisis of 1994 | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Nearly 300 documents capture the reluctance of the United Nations Security Council to respond to the deepening crisis.
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Video - Neill deGrasse Tyson breaks down the difference between weather and climate

Video - Neill deGrasse Tyson breaks down the difference between weather and climate | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

Neil deGrasse Tyson breaks down the differences between weather and climate change.


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Panama's Canal Divides A Country Into Haves And Have Nots

Panama's Canal Divides A Country Into Haves And Have Nots | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Panama City's skyline is full of gleaming office towers and the economy is the fastest growing in Latin America thanks to the canal. But the country still suffers from glaring social inequalities.

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How To Farm a Better Fish

How To Farm a Better Fish | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Can the blue revolution solve the world's food puzzle?

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Eritrea's Communications Disconnect

Eritrea's Communications Disconnect | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Eritrea is the least technologically connected country on earth
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Global Refugee Population Surging Amid Conflicts, Persecution: U.N. - NBC News

Global Refugee Population Surging Amid Conflicts, Persecution: U.N. - NBC News | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The number of people displaced by bloody conflict and persecution has exceeded 50 million for the first time since the post-World War II era — a vast populat...
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Why Does China Even Care About Scottish Independence?

Why Does China Even Care About Scottish Independence? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
China is well-known for
cracking down on areas seeking self-rule at home. The breakaway regions of
Tibet and Xinjiang have become perpetual objects of Beijing's displeasure. That
opposition to regional autonomy is now making itself felt abroad. On Tuesday,
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang scolded Scots seeking independence from
London.
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The rise and fall of Australian slang

The rise and fall of Australian slang | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

Notice all of the different factors that contribute to the development of slang!

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Urged to Multiply, Iranian Couples Are Dubious - NYTimes.com

Urged to Multiply, Iranian Couples Are Dubious - NYTimes.com | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

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Infographic - South China Sea face off

Infographic - South China Sea face off | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

China has accused Vietnam of ramming its ships more than 1,000 times in a part of the sea and said while it wanted good relations with its neighbor, it would not abandon principles to achieve that.


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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."


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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 2014 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:16 PM

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:51 PM

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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Tyson Foods wins Hillshire, eyes breakfast growth

Tyson Foods wins Hillshire, eyes breakfast growth | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Tyson Foods Inc. won the bidding battle for Chicago-based Hillshire Brands Co., agreeing to pay $7.8 billion in a deal that it believes will bolster its efforts in the rapidly growing breakfast segment.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

What impact will this have on the poultry and pork industries?  Think commodity chains...

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The Tiananmen Massacre: 25 Years Later, Three Students Tell What They Saw

The Tiananmen Massacre: 25 Years Later, Three Students Tell What They Saw | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Jonathan Chan, Kenneth Lam and Liane Lee were eyewitnesses to the bloody events of June 4, 1989. Now a quarter-century later, the former Hong Kong activists and student supporters of the Tiananmen protests share their painful memories
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

Places have meaning.  Would this have happened anywhere else in China?

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Russian youth group says no to Coke

Russian youth group says no to Coke | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Russian youth group calls for boycott of US fast-food.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

What does this article show us about economics, politics and culture?  What about nationalism?

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?


Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

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Heavy Industry in the Mississippi 'Prairie': Why Are These Factories Here?

Heavy Industry in the Mississippi 'Prairie': Why Are These Factories Here? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
"Live every second as if your ASS is on fire," and other words of wisdom.

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Jane Ellingson's curator insight, June 1, 2014 10:14 AM

Weber?Agglomeration? SEZ?