Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

Via Seth Dixon
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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 5:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:34 PM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

We could use an entire month of class to discuss and explore these maps. Since we don't have that time, please begin yourselves on your own!

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 10:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 2015 4:04 AM

China's one-child policy has had a greater effect than slowing population growth and decreasing the labor force. Another widespread problem for parents obeying this rule is the loss of their only child and the devastation it brings due to the cultural importance of family in China. Ancestors are greatly respected and descendents mark a great life. After parents retire they rely on their children for support and their needs. When they do not have a child anymore, their whole life derails and they spend the rest of their days with a broken family that can never quite heal. In many cases, the parents are then too old to have another child and their life simply falls apart. Protests have been made in the past for similar situations, but the Chinese government has not yet fulfilled its promises to provide greater assistance to these parents or to change their policy.

 

This article relates to population and migration through the population policy of China and its drastic effects on family life and parents. This policy would be classified as anti-natalist because of its promotion of smaller families with less children. It discourages having children.

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Why the French Can’t Say No to the McCamembert

Why the French Can’t Say No to the McCamembert | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Each Friday Roads & Kingdoms and Slate publish a new dispatch from around the globe. For more foreign correspondence mixed with food, war, travel, and photography, visit their online magazine or follow @roadskingdoms on Twitter.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

This is a fascinating tale of globalization gone local.

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Cramming for Stardom at Korea’s K-Pop Schools

Cramming for Stardom at Korea’s K-Pop Schools | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Private institutions have sprung up around the country to teach Korean pop music, and long-established music and dance schools have begun to get with the pop plan.
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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 6:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 11:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:16 AM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 11:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:40 PM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization

All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Data visualization of the 2013 MLB All-Star Final Vote distribution

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 14, 2013 6:34 PM

AnotherAa other great geography source

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 9:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:16 AM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

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Do High Altitudes Shape Languages?

Do High Altitudes Shape Languages? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
A new study claims that mountains may have influenced a special class of sounds occurring in almost all of the languages of the Caucasus.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 2:47 AM

Linguistic correlation to terrain.

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing and election?  Simple.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 10:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 3:40 PM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 3:14 PM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Population Density

Population Density | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 29, 2015 1:28 AM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:50 AM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian...

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 2015 6:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 7:25 PM

This was interesting to read because I don't associate the two till I can visually see it.  Then to further call it Eurasia makes sense as well.  There is a population that are considered Asian Russians.  I did a study on this culture and I couldn't believe there were Asian Russians. This sounds crazy.  It would make sense for cross cultures in this region.  

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What's in a Name?

What's in a Name? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Pentagon has upset patriots by labeling the body of water between Korea and Japan in an exhibition depicting various battles fought during the 1950-53 Korean War as "Sea of Japan" rather than "East Sea."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 3:14 PM

Earlier this week I posted on whether a group of islands off the coast of Argentina should be called the Falkland Islands or Las Malvinas.  There is some geopolitical significance to which name you ascribe to particular places.  Does it matter if I call the sea to the east of the Korean Peninsula the "East Sea" and if someone else refers to this same body of water west of Japan the "Sea of Japan?"  For many years the Sea of Japan has been the defacto name internationally and South Korean officials have lobbied (quite successfully) to bolster the legitimacy of the name within the media, publishers and cartographers and other governments.  Last summer, a worker in the South Korean government's Ministry of Foreign Affairs requested that I share some resources that state South Korea's position(see also this 10 minute video), showing their commitment to this rebranding effort.  Also see this GeoCurrents article on the subject in 2012, after South Korea's failed attempt to get international recognition.


Questions to Ponder: What other places have multiple names?  What are the political overtones to the name distinctions? What are other tricky places on the map where distinct groups would label/draw things differently?  Is the map an 'unbiased' source of information? 


Tags: language, toponyms, South Korea, historical, colonialism, cartography.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:16 PM

I agree with Peter Kim and others that are fighting to have the name changed to the East Sea. The term "Sea of Japan" was used in colonial times of South Korea. Now that those times are long gone, it I can understand why South Korea would want to get rid of anything related to that time period. This actually reminds of something that I'm going over in my colonial history class; the Pueblo Revolt (1680). During this time Indians revolted against the Spanish colonizers oppressing them and taking away their traditions, forcibly converting them to Christianity. During their revolt the Indians destroyed many of the Spanish institutions, especially those related to religion. They destroyed churches and even defaced the statues of the saints, and returned to their traditional practices.

This article also reminded of Sri Lanka changing the its colonial name on Government institutions from Ceylon to Sri Lanka. This happened not to long ago. The Island's colonial name (Ceylon) was dropped when they became their own country in 1972. However, the name Ceylon remained on many of the Government institutions (e.g. Bank of Ceylon or Ceylon Fisheries Corporation). However, in 2010 the name was dropped for good.  

James Hobson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:55 AM

(East Asia topic 10 [an independent topic])

{And finally a topic outside of China...}

Just as mentioned in a Scoop from a previous topic section, names can be viewed as more than a word which identifies a place. The context of a name can run very deep and be highly contentious. In this case "Sea of Japan" and "East Sea" are contenders for the official name of the body of water between Japan, Korea, and Russia. Sea of Japan is an older term with more of a history, which especially invokes mentioning of the Korean War. East Sea is a post-war term hopes to remove national tension form its name.

   Should officials really 'rename the wheel', or can the original name be accepted just because of its location and historical use? Or perhaps neither of these options, or even a national-level split as is currently the case?

   Personally, I see it as the difference between Aquidneck Island and Rhode Island (the actual island, of course), or even relatable to French fries vs. freedom fries. Physical things don't change just because their names do. In my view, perhaps everybody should just choose whichever they are more familiar with and comfortable using, while taking into consideration and expressing that their reference of a location is not meant to imply any political views.

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The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
This “Histomap,” created by John B. Sparks, was first printed by Rand McNally in 1931. (The David Rumsey Map Collection hosts a fully zoomable version here.)
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

Maps can be used to showcase many different toes of information, as shown here.  What biases can you discover?  What truths?  How does the presentation of data either clarify or muddle your analysis?

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As Population Shifts in Harlem, Blacks Lose Their Majority - NYTimes.com

As Population Shifts in Harlem, Blacks Lose Their Majority - NYTimes.com | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
There are profound shifts in a neighborhood once synonymous with black urban America.

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Through the Eyes of the Maasai

Through the Eyes of the Maasai | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
A trip to Kenya to spend time among the Maasai people reveals questions of culture and the tension between judgment and an open mind.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

An interesting window to a different culture.  In what ways have the Masai adapted to the global economy?  How are they preserving their culture, and how is is changing?  To what extent are these changes welcomed?

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Parkour, a Pastime Born on the Streets, Moves Indoors and Uptown

Parkour, a Pastime Born on the Streets, Moves Indoors and Uptown | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Practitioners of parkour have long seen public spaces as their playground, and parkour as the ultimate rebel’s game. But now it has turned into a big business.
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's insight:

What model of diffusion does parkour follow?

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:10 AM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 5:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 1:10 PM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.

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Exploring the Paradox of U.S. Hispanics' Longer Life Expectancy - Population Reference Bureau

Despite having lower income and education levels, U.S. Hispanics tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years. Demographers call this the

Via Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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How self-driving cars will change cities - Per Square Mile

How self-driving cars will change cities - Per Square Mile | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Just as the automobile began reshaping cities a century ago, the self-driving car will change urban areas yet again.

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Betsy Smalley's curator insight, August 1, 2013 5:16 PM

and we still thought it was important to teach our sons to drive a stick shift. I can't wait to say to my grandchildren, "and in my day, we had to drive ourselves and actually watch the road."

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The End of the Suburbs | TIME.com

The End of the Suburbs | TIME.com | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The country is resettling along more urbanized lines, and the American Dream is moving with it

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:42 AM

Times change and so do urban patterns.

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Sino-Imperialism Through Investment and Infrastructure | Six Chinese Megaprojects Across the Globe | TIME.com

Sino-Imperialism Through Investment and Infrastructure | Six Chinese Megaprojects Across the Globe | TIME.com | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Middle Kingdom has been extending its reach far into Africa, Latin America and Europe with a variety of contentious industrial and infrastructure schemes


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New Zealand islands to be formally named - in English and Maori - Telegraph

New Zealand islands to be formally named - in English and Maori  - Telegraph | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
New Zealand's Geographic Board has recommended that the two islands be formally named for the first time – both in English and Maori.

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A Village Invents a Language All Its Own

A Village Invents a Language All Its Own | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
A linguist has concluded that a new language, with unique grammatical rules, has come into existence, created by children in a remote area of Australia.

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