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Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
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dilaycock's curator insight, April 2, 11:02 PM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 10:37 AM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 7:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography at West High School
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Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live

Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Our stuff often says a lot about us, whether we own a hybrid car or a station wagon, a MacBook Pro or an ancient desktop.  Among other things, cell phone brands say something about socio-economics – it takes a lot of money to buy a new iPhone 5 (and even more money to keep up with the latest models that come out faster than plan upgrades do). Consider, then, this map of Washington, D.C., which uses geolocated tweets, and the cell phone metadata attached to them, to illustrate who in town is using iPhones (red dots) and who's using Androids (green dots)."


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Mary Everhart's comment, June 26, 2013 7:59 PM
I keep wondering what impact commuting has on the patterns shown on the maps.
Timothy Roth's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:38 PM

This just amazes me! The information that geography relates to us will never cease to amaze me.

Fleur Farah's curator insight, May 27, 4:06 AM

Would Sydney show these trends?

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Population Density

Population Density | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:31 AM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 6:43 AM

This video is a great representation of our population's past and where it stands now. In the past our population was considered stable, where births cancelled out deaths, and the increase rates were regulated. Now, as we are advancing with better medicine, and agriculture we have fewer deaths, but still have lots of births. We've grown from one billion to seven billion in two hundred years. Chances are it wont continue growing this fast, but, if it does indeed grow we need to control are resources. (S.S.)

payton sidney dinwiddie 's curator insight, September 10, 6:44 AM

I enjoy this video because it gives a visual analysis of the worlds population. It also shows what an effect that the medical and as well as the agricultural revolution played as in a role in our worlds population. It also shows that america isn't  as big as we think .

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 4:55 PM

Unit 2