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Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 2014 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from AP Human Geography at West High School
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Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live

Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Our stuff often says a lot about us, whether we own a hybrid car or a station wagon, a MacBook Pro or an ancient desktop.  Among other things, cell phone brands say something about socio-economics – it takes a lot of money to buy a new iPhone 5 (and even more money to keep up with the latest models that come out faster than plan upgrades do). Consider, then, this map of Washington, D.C., which uses geolocated tweets, and the cell phone metadata attached to them, to illustrate who in town is using iPhones (red dots) and who's using Androids (green dots)."


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Mary Everhart's comment, June 26, 2013 10:59 PM
I keep wondering what impact commuting has on the patterns shown on the maps.
Timothy Roth's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:38 PM

This just amazes me! The information that geography relates to us will never cease to amaze me.

Fleur Farah's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:06 AM

Would Sydney show these trends?

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Population Density

Population Density | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.