Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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The End of the Solid South

The End of the Solid South | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The region's emerging majority is progressive. Its capitols are more conservative than ever. Something's got to give.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2013 6:38 PM

Political affiliation differs tremendously from region to region.  This article is a great reminder that there is plenty of intraregional diversity in the South as well.  Migration, urbanization and a changing economic landscape is reshaping Southern demographics as well as the voting constituency.  Imagining that all of the South will vote in one particular way as a solid block is now an antiquated way of thinking about Southern politics. 


Tags: political, the South, regions.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 9:13 AM

While the demographics in the south are changing, I still see the region remaining largely Republican at least over the next decade or so. In the era of Obama the state governments have swung largely to the right. So far they have faced little backlash for the turn rightward. I agree that something does have to give. I believe in will give in the direction of conservatism in the south. The region, for its entire history in our union as been conservative. The region will probably stick with the majority conservative party. Though in the year of Donald Trump, Ben Carson and Bernie Sanders who Knows?

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Baby Name Regions?

Baby Name Regions? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"The Social Security Administration this week released its list of 2012’s most popular baby names by state, and maybe explained why there are so many Jacobs and Sophias in your kids’ schools. Do you see your kids’ names here?"


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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 


Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2014 2:13 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 27, 2014 1:34 PM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. http://goo.gl/st4aLZ Like/Share/Comment. #quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed
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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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This week, Samoa will skip Friday

This week, Samoa will skip Friday | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Just this once, Samoa is making Dec. 30 disappear."

 

I hope you enjoy your Friday, because they won't in Samoa.  It didn't even happen, since they've canceled Friday Dec. 30th and just skipped straight to Dec 31st.  This would make no sense without an understanding of the International Date Line and the regional economic networks of Oceania.  Since Samoa's economy in tightly connected to New Zealand and Australia (on the 'other' side of the IDL) it's financially beneficial to have their work weeks line up to faciliate same day communications and business interactions.   For more see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-12-29/samoa-time-zone-jump/3751254 and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/30/world/asia/samoa-to-skip-friday-and-switch-time-zones.html?ref=sethmydans


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 2014 2:20 PM

I agree with the decision Samoa made to switch to the West side of the International Date Line. By doing this, the country completely skipped a day. Also, years ago Samoa switched from driving on the right side of the road (American style) to the left side (British style). They made these changes because their economy is connected to countries on the other side of the IDL, such as Australia and New Zealand.  

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:10 AM

Samoa and its neighbor Tokelau decided to undergo a time change that would align them with their Asian trading partners. With this new time zone, Samoa will be three hours ahead of eastern Australia as opposed to being 21 hours behind and 22 hours ahead of California, rather than the previous 2 hours it was behind it. In the Pacific, this tactic of shifting time is not unusual as many island nations have, at one point or another, shifted time zones, date lines, and daylight savings times. This move will make it much easier for Samoa to do business with Australia and New Zealand, which is important because their economies are linked closely to the rest of Asia, especially China. Samoa's prime minister explicitly stated that these economic factors were the driving forces behind this time change decision and the decision had nothing to do with trying to be the first country to enter the new year. I was surprised that a country could just decide this type of change at any point, but there seems to be no legal reason why a country could not do that. Whatever time zone a country feels it should enter it can, but telling the citizens about such a change seems like it would be hard to do. When everyone is accustomed to a certain time zone, I feel like making this change can have an effect on people especially those who travel. Getting used to a new time zone seems like it would take time to adjust to, but I guess for island nations in the Pacific, this is no new phenomenon as others have already engaged in these moves.

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:41 PM

Samoa is making a lot of changes.  Just reading about the time zone switch called for the need to focus on the switches.  I understand they want to stay up with business times in Brisbane.  The PM switched the driving side from right to left to be inline with New Zealand and Australia.  Now the PM is going to try to change the flag.  Maybe Samoa is making a few too many changes.  Where's the cultural identity going?  

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:50 PM

Although this was a rescooped article from another geography profile, when you clicked on it the link didn't come up. Here is the main link: http://mentalfloss.com/article/52558/107-regional-slang-words. A ton of people use slang words, but can you think of one hundred and seven different ones that you use? I know before I watched this video I couldn't. Just the first seven listed in this video were all describing a can of Dr. Pepper. One term they used that I had never heard was a Tonic. This was used in Boston so it was surprising to not here of it, especially when being so close to RI. Other slangs words varied from calling a grinder a hoogie, saying something is Baltic, meaning cold, and streams being called branches, usually in Wisconsin. It was interesting to see all the different words used to describe everyday items all around the world. We may talk a lot of slang, but I can guarantee that no one has heard of all these different slang terms. Great video produced by a funny guy, really enjoyable.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 2014 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 10:05 PM

I have never been to a Waffle House and I hate IHOP. I chose this article because the map popped out at me. It was like an IHOP take over with a poor Waffle House in the middle. However, it is interesting to see that when you open the article, the IHOP density comes out to  1,543, while Waffle House density comes out to 1,661. By looking at this map, you would think that IHOP would have the bigger density. Waffle House gets most of its business from states in the South, while IHOP seems to be all over the place, Northern and Southern states.

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

Alex Smiga's curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:47 AM

Looky thurrr

 

Funky American English dialects 

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 

 

Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2014 2:13 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 27, 2014 1:34 PM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. http://goo.gl/st4aLZ Like/Share/Comment. #quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed
Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.