Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home

Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The number is on the rise.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Kenneth Jordan's comment, September 3, 2013 11:21 PM
This shows how culturally diverse we are as a country. with more than 60 million people speaking another language besides English is in my opinion, interesting. It also means that these people will be able to share their culture with the ones around them.
Rainer Emily's curator insight, October 1, 2013 11:37 AM

Intellectual/arts?

 

This article is on intellectual and arts because its about how people aren't speaking English at home. The article is talking about how people wont speak English and stuff and thats intellectual. 

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A Village Invents a Language All Its Own

A Village Invents a Language All Its Own | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
A linguist has concluded that a new language, with unique grammatical rules, has come into existence, created by children in a remote area of Australia.

Via Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The Geography of Chechnya

The Geography of Chechnya | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 19, 2013 10:16 AM

Most Americans had never heard Chechnya before the Boston bombing in April 2013. Now, most think that it is full of America-hating terriosts. However, Chechnya is so very complex and diverse a place, that it is ludacris to think that. Over 100 languages are spoken in the country. The southern half speaks languages such as Georgian, Svan and Mingrelian. Turkish, Iranian and Chechens are the languages you will probably hear in the North. Another misconception is that there are many Christians in Chechnya as well as Muslims. This country is made up of so many different groups, it is incredible. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:27 AM

It is amazing to consider such a small area (the size of New England) could hold such a vast area of languages.  The mountainous region certainly helps in creating such diversity as it isolated villages from each other in the ages before modern communication and travel.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:46 PM

This map does a fantastic job of highlighting the cultural diversity within Russia and the former Soviet states. Understanding how these cultural regions overlap one another is paramount in understanding the region's tensions and the repercussions that result including Chechen terrorism in Russia and even in America (Boston bombings).

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:21 PM

unit 3

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 2015 2:52 PM

I can't say I was a fan of Ms. Burnett's reporting style. First of all, implying that America is the only country that speaks English was a little blind. Second, the little chuckles and smirks she gives is a bit condescending. She came off rather harsh and confronting of the French. And I'm sure France isn't "declaring war on English" as they are probably doing this to other languages. Finally, her last remark referencing the song "Voulez vous coucher avec moi" was a tad inappropriate in my opinion. That being said, it's understandable for a country to try and protect its language. It's part of its culture and its heritage.

 

Languages change overtime through interaction with other people. Like Ms. Burnett pointed out, there are some French words that have become common use in the everyday American conversation like a la carte and bon voyage. It is impossible to keep a language "pure" or rid of other language influences in today's society. With all the interaction happening via the web and other media outlets, people are bound to pick up words from other languages to use in their lives. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:45 AM

Frances attempts at keeping the French language pure are futile. It is impossible to stop the spread of information in a society. In the age of the internet, information is going to spread. If the internet can take down middle eastern dictators, it is going to expose French children to English words. This entire policy is a bad public relations move for the nation of France.  It makes the nation and its government seem as if they are intolerant of other cultures and views. France prides itself on being an open democratic society. An open society can not ban a language. France should reverse this policy immediately.

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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


Via Seth Dixon
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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:50 PM

Although this was a rescooped article from another geography profile, when you clicked on it the link didn't come up. Here is the main link: http://mentalfloss.com/article/52558/107-regional-slang-words. A ton of people use slang words, but can you think of one hundred and seven different ones that you use? I know before I watched this video I couldn't. Just the first seven listed in this video were all describing a can of Dr. Pepper. One term they used that I had never heard was a Tonic. This was used in Boston so it was surprising to not here of it, especially when being so close to RI. Other slangs words varied from calling a grinder a hoogie, saying something is Baltic, meaning cold, and streams being called branches, usually in Wisconsin. It was interesting to see all the different words used to describe everyday items all around the world. We may talk a lot of slang, but I can guarantee that no one has heard of all these different slang terms. Great video produced by a funny guy, really enjoyable.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

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What's in a Name?

What's in a Name? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Pentagon has upset patriots by labeling the body of water between Korea and Japan in an exhibition depicting various battles fought during the 1950-53 Korean War as "Sea of Japan" rather than "East Sea."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:14 AM

Earlier this week I posted on whether a group of islands off the coast of Argentina should be called the Falkland Islands or Las Malvinas.  There is some geopolitical significance to which name you ascribe to particular places.  Does it matter if I call the sea to the east of the Korean Peninsula the "East Sea" and if someone else refers to this same body of water west of Japan the "Sea of Japan?"  For many years the Sea of Japan has been the defacto name internationally and South Korean officials have lobbied (quite successfully) to bolster the legitimacy of the name within the media, publishers and cartographers and other governments.  Last summer, a worker in the South Korean government's Ministry of Foreign Affairs requested that I share some resources that state South Korea's position(see also this 10 minute video), showing their commitment to this rebranding effort.  Also see this GeoCurrents article on the subject in 2012, after South Korea's failed attempt to get international recognition.


Questions to Ponder: What other places have multiple names?  What are the political overtones to the name distinctions? What are other tricky places on the map where distinct groups would label/draw things differently?  Is the map an 'unbiased' source of information? 


Tags: language, toponyms, South Korea, historical, colonialism, cartography.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM

I agree with Peter Kim and others that are fighting to have the name changed to the East Sea. The term "Sea of Japan" was used in colonial times of South Korea. Now that those times are long gone, it I can understand why South Korea would want to get rid of anything related to that time period. This actually reminds of something that I'm going over in my colonial history class; the Pueblo Revolt (1680). During this time Indians revolted against the Spanish colonizers oppressing them and taking away their traditions, forcibly converting them to Christianity. During their revolt the Indians destroyed many of the Spanish institutions, especially those related to religion. They destroyed churches and even defaced the statues of the saints, and returned to their traditional practices.

This article also reminded of Sri Lanka changing the its colonial name on Government institutions from Ceylon to Sri Lanka. This happened not to long ago. The Island's colonial name (Ceylon) was dropped when they became their own country in 1972. However, the name Ceylon remained on many of the Government institutions (e.g. Bank of Ceylon or Ceylon Fisheries Corporation). However, in 2010 the name was dropped for good.  

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 9:55 PM

(East Asia topic 10 [an independent topic])

{And finally a topic outside of China...}

Just as mentioned in a Scoop from a previous topic section, names can be viewed as more than a word which identifies a place. The context of a name can run very deep and be highly contentious. In this case "Sea of Japan" and "East Sea" are contenders for the official name of the body of water between Japan, Korea, and Russia. Sea of Japan is an older term with more of a history, which especially invokes mentioning of the Korean War. East Sea is a post-war term hopes to remove national tension form its name.

   Should officials really 'rename the wheel', or can the original name be accepted just because of its location and historical use? Or perhaps neither of these options, or even a national-level split as is currently the case?

   Personally, I see it as the difference between Aquidneck Island and Rhode Island (the actual island, of course), or even relatable to French fries vs. freedom fries. Physical things don't change just because their names do. In my view, perhaps everybody should just choose whichever they are more familiar with and comfortable using, while taking into consideration and expressing that their reference of a location is not meant to imply any political views.

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from Geography Education
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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

Alex Smiga's curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:47 AM

Looky thurrr

 

Funky American English dialects 

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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How language transformed humanity

TED Talks Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language.

 

Why is language such a critical component to human cultures and the technologies that we have created?  Why did linguistic diversity exist in great abundance 500 years ago but is now increasingly shrinking?  What is the future geography of languages on Earth going to look like? 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 19, 2013 12:27 PM

And if we did choose one language that would be the world standard what would it be?  I would guess that the Western cultures would demand English.  But why should English be the standard?