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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2013 1:00 PM

The United States as a whole does not have demographic numbers similar to European countries with declining populations...but 'white' America does.  The NY Times also noted that this statistical benchmark happened, but it was quietly mentioned with many other demographic statistics without an analysis of how this will impact the United States.  

Question to Ponder: how will this impact the United States in coming generations?  What will the cultural, economic and political impacts be?  Why explains the differents between the distinct populations in the United States?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsethnicity.

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:41 PM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 1:18 PM

This video is a great audio supplement to these maps that display regional variations of vocabulary terms. 


Tags: language, North America, regions, USA.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 3:43 PM

This is an interesting video explaining words heard in different parts of the country. The video displays not only the cultural diversity of America but also how difficult it is to learn the English language. Although I was born and raised in Rhode Island most of the terms I am familiar with are the ones from the south (my dad's from Texas/California) and Massachusetts (my mom's from Fall River Mass). However, I have always used bubbler, but dandle board....really?

Anyways this video is pretty entertaining and informing. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 9:17 AM
This video is a very interesting way to see where a lot of our everyday vocabulary comes from. It gives us insight to the diversity in culture that America expresses. Now I can understand why it is so hard for many people to learn the English language, we have slang for everything, and a different slang word for each part of America. I am familiar with a lot of the terms, being a New England Native. Bubbler, wicked, soda, and cellar are some that are part of my everyday vocabulary (and unfortunately, being from Rhode Island sometimes the "R" seems to drop). It is amazing to see all the different words we have for just one thing and where they use them. It is just another great example of how widely diverse our country is.
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In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters

In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte, and much higher in New York and Boston.

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Ryane Williams's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:47 PM

Facilities management entails a broad array of disciplines including, but not limited to, planning, designing, leasing, space planning, product management, capital management, construction management, property management, and real estate acquisition, planning and disposal.

Jordan Anderson- www.havefunandprofit.com's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:58 PM

Location is very important to have more income!

Charles Henderson's comment, August 14, 2013 12:37 AM
Would have been nice for them to include cost of living comparisons. You might be in the top 20% of the country making $107,000 in NYC, but that's only $48,000 in Atlanta. Median income in Atlanta is $30,000 which would be $67,000 in NYC (about $21000 higher than NYC's current median salary). Where you live makes a difference, but HOW you live is just as important.
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Bizarre Borders


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 7:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.