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Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup

Argentina's Falklands Banner Sparks Anger Ahead Of World Cup | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Argentina and England are unlikely to meet at the World Cup finals, however their rivalry was reignited at the weekend when the Argentine national side posed behind a banner claiming the Falkland Islands belong to the South American country. Ahead of their warm-up match with Slovenia in Buenos Aires, the team displayed the message in support of the country's claims over the sovereignty of the islands in the South Atlantic, which are a British Overseas Territory.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 10, 2014 3:25 PM

The World Cup can make things interesting when nationalistic fervor becomes politicized and moves to issues off the pitch.  Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  Like Gibraltar, the Falklands are British Oversees Territories, ones that Margaret Thatcher was willing to fight Agrentina to maintain;  Argentina still claims Las Malvinas as their territory.  For a great teaching resource on this issue, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE 2013 (sign up to attend NCGE 2014 here).  


Tags: Argentinasport, bordersgeopolitics, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:17 PM

Sempre a geopolítica...  Malvinas.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:15 PM

This article is highly interesting for me, because I am a student in Geography 200, but I also love soccer, and the English National Team is one of my favorite sides.  I think it is interesting how in the World Cup, the Argentines took an opportunity of being on the world stage to claim that the Falkland Islands, or the "Las Malvinas", belong to their country and not their bitter soccer enemy, England.  I think that had this banner been displayed before and England v Argentina final, the game would have had an explosive atmosphere, especially since the Argentines are also rivals of Brazil.  I think it is interesting how geo-political issues can play themselves out on the pitch of the "beautiful game".  This fact shows that soccer is indeed the "World's Game".  As I stated before, I would have loved to see the passion this would have inspired before an England-Argentina game.  To this day, England prefers Portugal over Argentina in soccer, probably because of their checkered history.

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Geographic Ignorance

Geographic Ignorance | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:33 AM

Just another prime example of American ignorance. We're all guilty! But to what extent is this our fault and to what extent is it what we're taught at a young age in school. 

David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 8:27 PM

Existe la ignorancia geofrafica en personajes publicos.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:44 PM

Oh wow...

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.

Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.