Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page
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Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers

Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Report details deaths of 964 workers from Nepal, India and Bangladesh from cardiac arrests, falls and suicide

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Migrant workers often represent the minority group in a particular country, such as Qatar (in this example). As such, migrant workers often have little rights or worker securities that most often accompany other workers and protect their rights; however, with the current immigrant explosion in Qatar as a result of the booming oil industry, it is easy for these migrant workers to be exploited and unaccounted for. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 PM

While places like Qatar enjoy huge economic growth and are undertaking equally huge developments, worker exploitation has also risen. Of the nearly 1000 migrant worker deaths over a two year period, the fact that most of them were from either "sudden illnesses", falls, or suicide suggests that working conditions are abysmal. The article also outlines how the entire structure of recruiting and employing migrant workers has allowed these deaths to occur.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:02 PM

The death of migrant workers in Qatar has been an issue for the past decade, and the decision to appoint the nation as the host for the 2022 World Cup has only served to exacerbate the problem even more. The construction of new stadiums to host the event within the tiny nation has put an enormous burden on its migrant workers as these huge projects are underway. It is estimated that anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand workers have died in construction projects specifically related to the World Cup, and yet FIFA has continued to turn a blind eye to the project. This implied condoning of the treatment of these foreign workers in Qatar is unacceptable, and the nation should be stripped of its right to hose the World Cup. Even without the fatalities, foreign workers living in Qatar face serious discrimination at the hands of the natives, who view this impoverished (and effectively imprisoned) population as second class citizens. Such behavior should not be condoned, and it would be prudent for both FIFA and the West to intervene and either prevent said treatment of foreign workers, or to kick Qatar out of the tournament. 

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Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric

Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
Iran's annual al-Quds - or Jerusalem - Day, denouncing Israel, is as much an expression of policy as ritual, writes BBC Persian's Siavash Ardalan.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 2014 8:39 PM

The people of Iran gather to celebrate Jerusalem Day. Each year millions of people come together to express their hatred towards Israel and support towards Palestinians. They rally and some people including politicians give speeches. Speeches by President Ahmadinejad even included the denial of the holocaust.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:19 PM

This day is pro-Palestinian and is a must-go-to event for politicians. Any politician that wants to be heard or even listened to in the future must make their way to this parade of protests and Iranian rituals.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:07 PM

considering that this is an annual holiday, and considering that there are the television shows that depict the Jews as bent on world domination and as using the blood of christian children to cook bread during Passover, i don't think we should potentially giving them nukes.

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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:56 PM

This video was great to watch. I watched this in class and had to write about it. Humor is a great way to shed light on certain topics that can be really heavy. This comedian is middle eastern himself which makes it better for him to talk about these topics. Many individuals don't know the lighter side to middle eastern people just because all they see is negative aspects of the culture. I enjoyed that he could talk about serious topics and have a room full of people not only laughing at it but being educated at the same time. People don't feel like they're being strictly taught because they're watching a comedian give a show. Being middle eastern myself, i found this video great because raising awareness and allowing more insight about the middle east is a powerful thing when it has always has a negative context. 

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:42 PM

"I never knew these people laughed." This is perhaps one of the most sad things that could be said. It dehumanizes the middle east in a very cruel way. It implies that people in the middle east do not have any sense of humor and are always serious about everything. Like the United States, there are times to be serious, but there are also times to laugh. The media and even the film industry in the US portrays the middle east as Sodom and Gomorra and the people from the area as misogynistic religious fanatics. It is truly sad that we live in a world where prejudices trump openness and acceptance.      

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:17 PM

its interesting because this video make the middle east seem more european with the differences in culture. people tend to clump these countries together but they are very different and should be seen that way

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The "Seinfeld of Saudi Arabia"

"[This video] explores the idea Western “cultural invasion” into Saudi Arabia, and satirizes Saudi views of America in the process. The influence of Western, particularly American, culture is a big, touchy topic in much of the world, with people torn between their love of Michael Jackson and their desire to patronize compatriots over foreigners. It’s about national pride and about preserving one’s own culture.  For English captions (click the little 'CC' button in the bottom-right corner after pressing play).

 

Skip to about 3:15 to see the segment on the Western 'cultural invasion' of Saudi Arabia and, appropriately, a very funny bit on attempting a 'reverse cultural invasion' of Saudi cultural in America."

--Max Fisher in the Washington Post


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Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:42 PM
Throughout the world, American pop culture is what defines us, and it is definitely what we use to define ourselves, as well. When we look to other countries, we look to see what their popular culture is like and compare it to our own. I love this video because I think that it is poking fun at both American popular culture and Saudi culture. Where American pop culture is so large and all encompassing, Saudi pop culture is small and not nearly as significant in defining its people.
When we, as Americans, see Saudi Arabians, we see a repressed culture, but just because they don’t have the pop culture that we have, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have a distinct identity. Obviously the Saudis have a distinct identity, and obviously they aren’t afraid to poke fun at what Americans think of their culture.
Peter Siner's comment, April 30, 2013 9:29 AM
It seems as though throughout history there have always been tendencies for the Middle East to fall under a westernized mindset. Organizations and rulers throughout Middle Eastern history had challenged this idea. However, especially in todays society we are seeing a shift where the people of the middle east are becoming more and more accepting of westernized practices. The biggest hump however seems to be overcoming the religious boundaries that tie down the Middle East to its traditional ways. This process of westernization is not one that can be completed over night and it will most certainly be a very slow process that takes the time and effort of the people to make it happen. We are already seeing popular westernized culture integrate with the traditional culture of the middle east. With time, it is almost inevitable for the views of the western world to completely influence the people especially since the younger generations are so willing to change.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:15 AM

This is a fun video.  I like it because it exposes an Arab man for being just like any other American.  His comedy is good and it shows that Arabs are just like anyone of us.  Many times, lately, in America Arabs are pictured as being unforgiving, always serious, and ruthless people.  La Yekthar shows us the side of a Saudi comedian that we probably wouldn't see in mainstream American media.

 

I loved how the comedy was essentially a "roast" of his own culture, which shows that they are not much different than us.  The fact of the matter is that we have to be critical of our media.  Most people in the world are very similar to each other.  Yes, there are extremists and bad people in every ethnic group, but the bottom line is that they only make up a very small minority of a population.   I wish the media would focus as much on positive aspects of a foreign country as they do the negatives.

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U.N. approves Palestinian 'observer state' bid

U.N. approves Palestinian 'observer state' bid | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it
The United Nations General Assembly approved an upgraded U.N. status for the Palestinian Authority, despite U.S. and Israeli opposition.


While this may be primarily symbolic, it is still a highly significant move on the part of the United Nations.  65 years ago, the United Nations called for a two-state system.  This map of the vote that I found on Facebook (can't find another source as of yet) is quite intriguing. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why might a country choose to abstain?  Can you think of a specific reason why a particular country abstained?  With this new geopolitical fact, how will Israel and Palestine move forward?   


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:25 AM

One year ago, the U.N. status regarding Palestine was upgraded from "non-member observer entity" to "non-member observer state".  While Palestinians believe that this is a major push for peace and for Palestinian independence, other countries believe that the change will not do anything for Palestine.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:17 AM

(Africa topic 3)

Though there is much to be said from this map, I would like to focus on the red and black countries. I was surprised that only 9 nations did not support the acknowledgement of Palestine as a recognizable political entity. Of those 9, only 2 are members of the G8 (or perhaps now G7 due to Russia's suspension) Summit committee. The countries which abstained likely did so out of a mix of reasons: to not offend some of their allies by voting no, to not offend other allies by voting yes, not having enough of an opinion to make a complete decision, or having a mixed opinion within their own borders. IN this way it's a "pleading the Fifth" motion, which I believe can be seen as a smart move, politically speaking. Just like the 2-party struggle within the US, sometimes there are no two clear right and wrong answers.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:24 PM

the only reason i can see for not including paslestine is that they do not have defined country boarders. this would make it difficult for them to be included in decisions made by the U.N. once they have established boarders (something they need to work out with israel and the U.N.) i can not see any reason to not include them. conversely, if they are included in the U.N. then it seems that it would only help to resolve the issue since they would both seemingly be more linked together in a positive way.

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Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 2015 8:40 PM

From 1946 to 2000, Palestine (Islamic individuals) have been at war with Israel (Jewish individuals) over land in Israel/Palestine. In 1946, Palestine took over most of Israel but throughout the decades up until 2000, Israel slowly won over almost every piece of Israel and now, Palestine barely has any land in Israel. From 1949 to 1967, Palestine took over a specific area of Israel known as the West Bank and another small part of Israel known as Gaza. There was a lot of war going on between Israel and Palestine because Israel discriminated against non-Jews. Palestinians became refugees but that didn't stop Israel from fighting to take over Palestinian land.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 30, 2015 1:03 AM

The video was informative, but bias. I have a stronger understanding of how Israel is exploiting, how the borders were re-drawn, and how the make up of the original border mattered. However, the author gave me these facts in a very pro-Palestinian manner. The narrator sees the Palatines as refugees instead of the Jews, who as the narrator said, were "refugees living where people already lived." This similar identity clearly resonated with the narrator who almost 2 minutes of the video speaking about how the treatment of the new refugees was wrong. While a fair amount of the rest of the video advocated a solution to help Palestinian, hence the negative portrayals of the United States backed peace talks.  

 

What was missing from this video was Israeli's story. The Jewish community had become a large force within Palestinian, but was not being aptly recognized. In fact, the Palestinian's prior to the UN offer weren't treating the Jews fair. When this offer came along, it was the Palestinian's who started the fight, a point that was down played in this video as the narrator rushed to point the finger at Israeli's wrong doings. Yet, another portrayal of this conflict mentioned in class, showed the Israeli's feel threatened because they are a minority surrounded by enemies within the region. All of this information means that the Palestinian's and other neighbors play more of a negative hand in the land dispute than what the narrator says.    

 

To be honest, I don't know enough about either side to really say who I support. However, from what I gather, neither side is a bushel of roses. As learned in class their were a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that caused the fighting and their is still a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that factor into the fighting today. Thus, the bias of this video acts as a reminder that a person looking to understand a heated conflict, such as this one between neighbors, must view the information with causation. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:30 PM

first off, this video is very pro isrelis which must be kept in mind. also i dont know what the palestinians and surrounding countries expected. the jews had nowhere to go and were sent there by england. where else where they to go? instead of accepting this the palestinians started to attack them and when they lost they wanted to come back and live there, of course the jews were not going to let them back in. neither side is completely right or wrong but i can see the jewish side more than the palestinians.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 

 

Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2014 2:13 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 27, 2014 1:34 PM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. http://goo.gl/st4aLZ Like/Share/Comment. #quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed
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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

Rescooped by Jessica Robson Postlethwaite from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Crisis Guide: Iran

Crisis Guide: Iran | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

"Iran poses steep challenges to its Middle East neighbors and the world. Explore the country's complex regime structure and controversial nuclear program, and watch experts debate the range of policy options."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:08 PM

Iran is in the middle of one of the most important geopolitical regions. One the bordered with Iraq and the Persian Gulf, Iran is stratgeically positioned to have considerable control over the world’s most important waterway for oil shipping and trade, the Strait of Hormuz.


Given it's context, Iran is a country that students should more about than the three main facts that that most Americans are already aware of (1-Iran has an Islamic-based government, 2-an emerging nuclear program and 3-a ton of oil).  This interactive feature is a good starting point with great videos, timelines, maps, articles that assess the current situation in Iran. 


Tags: Iran, political, Middle East.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:35 AM

This is an amzing resource to use and find out much about this country, both its past and present.  With this you can understand their feeling of hatred toward the US with its support of the Shah.  This is a relationship that the US needs to repair, but both sides need to work on this.  This are is so important to the US and the world given Iran's geographic location right on the Persian Gulf, whcih they can cut off and controll the oil flowing from that area, plus the oil they control, plus bordering several crucial US and NATO allies.  It only seems in everyone's best interest to sit down and talk.  Given the support Iran gives to many terrorists organization and it's longstanding position that Israel does not have the right the right to exist, this idea of sitting down and talking may be a fantasy.  However, with the new elections and the new President of Iran speaking at the UN there may be renewed hope of at least a start. 

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Jamey Kahl's curator insight, March 27, 11:09 PM

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Human Conflict Seen From Space

Human Conflict Seen From Space | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

I'll let Douglas Keeney's own words and this image speak for themselves: "The geography of human conflict as seen from space at night. The Strait of Hormuz as seen at night from the space station is a beautiful lesson in the geography of conflict. How much we learn by simply tracing the fingers of human populations as seen superimposed over the geography of Earth. Enjoy." 

-From Lights of Mankind: Earth at Night From Space


What would a picture look like from a drone's perspective?  Where are these places that are being targeted?  This Instagram account is incredibly thought-provoking and informative.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:02 AM

Most likely, these lights represent urban areas which contains a higher population. As we can see in this photo, one territory stands out more not because of it's lights, but because we know that it is a higher population. Also we see urban areas that "never sleeps." What I mean by "never sleeps" is that the city functions late at night and still has people explore it 24/7.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:56 AM

The view from space is always life changing. The image underscores the conflict taking place in the region. Only from the sky, can use see the vastness of the conflict taking place. Television and film cameras can only capture so much of a war. Looking down from the sky gives us a better view of the overall devastation taking place. The Middle East is truly on fire.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Ms. Postlethwaite's Human Geography Page | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 


Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2014 2:13 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 27, 2014 1:34 PM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. http://goo.gl/st4aLZ Like/Share/Comment. #quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed
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Religion, Gender and Public Space

These three issues are deeply interconnected in many parts of the world and in this news report from Israel, ultra-Orthodox from the town of Beit Shemesh are seeking to enforce their vision of a religiously appropriated gendered partition of space.  This particular news clip has caused a firestorm, and the Israeli PM has publicly states that gender segregation will not be tolerated.   

 

On Monday, as the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported, "about 300 ultra-Orthodox men attacked police officers, hurling stones at the officers after they removed a sign ordering women not to walk past a synagogue in Beit Shemesh."  Obviously they are not indicative of all Jews, but this raises many questions.  Why do we see a rise in of religious extremism (a loaded word, but I'll listen to alternatives) in this era of globalization?  Why is equality in where and how people can act in public such an important political freedom?  Why is there such strong cultural reactions to diverse gender norms in public?      

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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:45 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the intricate web of cutlure in religion and how different aspects of the country or adherent is affected or affects the religion.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it talks about religions affecting behaviors. This also relates to the book "Half the sky" and the obstacle of gender inequality.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This relates to the section by talking about religion, and gender inequality, and how many people do not want women to go against their cultural and religious beliefs.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it talks about how religion affects the behaviors of people as they go about practicing their religions. Their particular religions influence their political beliefs and other parts of their daily lives.