MS Geography Reso...
Follow
Find tag "mapping"
286 views | +0 today
MS Geography Resources
Resources for teaching geography for middle school kids.
Curated by Lori Johnson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.    

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  


Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
CT Blake's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:55 AM

Useful for understanding the use of GIS and differences with GPS.

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:16 AM

I chose this scoop because the title "Not All English is the Same" really stuck out at me. It made me think back to the other article I did on 107 regional slang words. This article was about accents and that everyone pronounces everything differently depending on where you are located in the world. In the main map being shown, they ask the question "What do you call a miniature lobster that one finds in lakes and streams?" A majority of the United States calls it a crawfish, represented by the color red. Another portion calls it a crayfish, represented by the color green. A few people call it a crawdad which is shown in blue and some people just have no word for something that fits this description. It was interesting to see that most of the places that called it a crawfish are located down the Eastern border of the US, with the exception of the scattered states. The people that called it a crayfish are mostly located in the middle of the US and the people who classify it as a crawdad are mostly located in the Northeast.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

Scooped by Lori Johnson
Scoop.it!

Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 


Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  


Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 

more...
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

Rescooped by Lori Johnson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American HistoryCapturing the Past Through MapsDisease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental MappingSlavery and the Origin of Statistical CartographyThe Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.