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MS Geography Resources
Resources for teaching geography for middle school kids.
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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, May 25, 3:04 PM

Where there is a need there is a way.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 9:23 AM

This article shows how parts of the world plays host to some of the more dangerous industries in existence because they are desperate for jobs and will take any work that comes their way. The ship-breakers are mostly men that work to recycle retired cargo ships. This job is extraordinary dangerous due to the fact that the ships are built not to be taken apart. We can see the lack of development in some parts of the world through this industry's presence in southwest Asia. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, June 4, 6:28 PM

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...


At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  


Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 8:15 AM

The United States should really get back on board with trains. Pun intended. They were a marvel which practically created the west, and yet we abandoned them for air travel and the highway system while many other countries found ways to further develop their train systems for the utmost speed and affordability. With the new technologies behind engineering, we now have the capabilities to tunnel straight through large mountains and connect even the most inaccessible areas. Creating new opportunity for human expansion in places otherwise difficult to get to.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 7:25 AM

This article expresses the need for better transportation in South America.  The need to bridge the Andes to better move trade goods from the pacific to Atlantic sides of the mountains.  This would have a huge effect on the economies of the two countries involved as well as an impact on international trade, just as the Panama Canal did when it was built.  The ability to cut through a mountain range and build a rail system is amazing and hopefully this vision of transportation can happen.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:14 AM

The Andes mountains are causing serious issues for Argentina. Obviously these mountains didn't grow over night but they have been more of a problem in recent years that in past years. Shipping costs are sky rocketing and in order for this South American country to keep a hold on its finances, they need to figure out a solution for transportation. A tunnel under the Andes mountains might just be the solution to this problem.

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | MS Geography Resources | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.


Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 7:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 9:28 AM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 2:00 PM

Very cool!