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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | MS Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, July 17, 8:44 PM

VISUALIZANDO TIEMPO Y ESPACIO

sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

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Median Age Around the World

Median Age Around the World | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The world's youngest and oldest populations.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

One of the most easily accessible indicators or development, median age sparks an interesting conversation about the challenges (crises?) at either extreme.

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | MS Geo | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Where police forces don't resemble the community

Where police forces don't resemble the community | MS Geo | Scoop.it
A Washington Post analysis of police staffing shows that the vast majority of cities have a police presence that is a lot whiter than the population.

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

While my students are not quite ready for this level of complexity on Day 1, this will be a nice data analysis warm-up next quarter. 

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | MS Geo | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | MS Geo | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 8:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 11, 9:16 AM

Both History and Geography explained in these maps

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 3:10 PM

With the increasing amount of information online it can be misleading at times. I do believe this is a useful collection of maps however I feel people looking at it might get trapped in a pitfall. After looking at these 40 maps a person could feel that this is all there is to know about this subject. Yes it is informative to have this information together but it should just be the start of the conversation not the end. So often we want quick google searches with definite answers,

when some topics require a lot of research from different sources. The reader needs to make up their own pool of knowledge.

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Scientists may have solved the giant Siberian crater mystery - and the news isn't good

Scientists may have solved the giant Siberian crater mystery - and the news isn't good | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Researchers have long contended the epicentre of global warming is also farthest from the reach of humanity.

Via Tony Hall
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Tony Hall's curator insight, August 5, 11:18 PM

This is quite interesting. Obvious links to Geography, ESS etc.. Could also use it in IB Theory of Knowledge.

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Nice intersection of geo and economics (for the social studies teachers out there) on a very high-interest topic.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:56 PM

APHG-U6

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:41 PM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 4:04 PM

Population unit

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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 3:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2:27 PM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 4:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | MS Geo | Scoop.it

"In symbolic terms, it's a huge loss. The Crimean Peninsula holds an important place in the region's history, and the inability to prevent the region from joining Russia is a serious test of leadership for the new Ukrainian government in Kiev.

In practical terms, however, what Crimea means for Ukraine is less clear. In an article last week, The Post's Will Englund noted that Crimea may end up costing Russia more than it might like. And what does Ukraine really lose?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 12:35 PM

We often view global affairs through our own little prism, considering how it affects us.  So much of the discussion has revolved around Russia and the West in general (and the U.S. specifically), that Ukraine almost gets lost in the shuffle.  All this amid news that the acting Ukrainian Foreign Minister has said that the possibility of war "is growing."

Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon, Anna Hoppe
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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 5:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 10:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 10:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble?

What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble? | MS Geo | Scoop.it
How California and Virginia can be as different as Liechtenstein and Brunei
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Helpful context for international development indicator.

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A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism

A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Published in 1941, this “Trading Game: France—Colonies” aimed to teach French children the basics of colonial management. 

 

Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,” Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.


Via Seth Dixon
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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | MS Geo | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


Via Seth Dixon
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MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 4:34 PM

APHG U4

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, Today, 2:38 PM

This photo shows what happens when a government is dedicated to developing agricultural industry. With a population so large it is critical that they capitalize on all their irritable land and there for that is why the border is so drastically different. In China they need the land to be used when it is possible.  

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Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time | MS Geo | Scoop.it

"It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail."


Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Human-Environment Interaction in GIFs.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 26, 6:42 PM

This is a great demonstration of human impacts on ecosystems. 7 locations in the world show dramatic change over time.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:19 AM

the Impact of HEI

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Amnesty International sends team within US for first time

Amnesty International sends team within US for first time | MS Geo | Scoop.it
As anger erupted again on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, a human rights team from Amnesty International worked on the ground in the US for the first time ever.

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

This might challenge the notion that humans rights are solely an American export.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 9:35 AM

After Michael Brown was shot 6 times by a police officer, the community was outraged and the police responded by maintaining their concept of control by exceeding their powers.  There will be much more fallout from this before it is all said and done. 

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15 Maps That Don't Explain the Middle East at All

15 Maps That Don't Explain the Middle East at All | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The region as it never was, could have been, and sort of is 
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Imperialism, nation-states, state-making, etc. 

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What's on the Other Side of the Ocean?

What's on the Other Side of the Ocean? | MS Geo | Scoop.it
For anyone who's ever been on a beach and curious.

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Use this for the warm-up on the first day of school and you'll have their interest all year.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 12:32 PM

For those that are critical of viral maps, what geographic and spatial relationships does this this map not convey?  What is good and bad about the cartographic design of this image?

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 5, 12:56 AM

Ever wonder what you can see from the coast? Here's a map that explains it all!

Think of the implications for relative location! 

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | MS Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, July 17, 8:44 PM

VISUALIZANDO TIEMPO Y ESPACIO

sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

I used to teach students about the surprising water crises in central and SE Wisconsin, one of the most water-rich states in the US. They were always blown away. Now, teaching in CO, everyone seems to have an awareness (anxiety?) about local water scarcity. This story, though, has more of a national, even global scope. 

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest

The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest | MS Geo | Scoop.it
After three decades of slow growth, middle-class incomes in the U.S. appear to trail those of Canada. Poor Americans now make less than the poor in several other countries.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

This shift is the result of policy choices:  The long march away from progressive taxation, regulation, labor unions in the context of globalization, while avoiding any middle-class boosting programs due to the specter of deficits and debt.

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | MS Geo | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”

 

I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


Via Seth Dixon, Cory Erlandson
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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Watch Your Name Grow and Shrink in Popularity Across the U.S.

Watch Your Name Grow and Shrink in Popularity Across the U.S. | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Tracking the spread of 29,000 baby names over the past century.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

It might be interesting to research causes of name spikes throughout history. I think there is a clear Haim/Feldman related spike in Corys in 1986-88.

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Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now

Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The places creative, service, and working class jobs will grow the most by 2022.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

It's not just "what" to do, but also "where."

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.  

 

At some point in all of our lives our perception of the world began to change- our knowledge of the world, from school or personal travel experience, began to grow in our minds a map of the world which started to encompass more than just our hometowns and the surrounding suburbs. Soon this mental map started to include nearby states or territories, other countries, and slowly but surely a global mental map was created in each of our minds, unique and personal to every one of us.


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