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Ukraine Crisis in Maps

Ukraine Crisis in Maps | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Russian forces in Crimea, protests and some of the political, cultural and economic factors in the crisis.
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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | MS Geo | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

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Christian Allié's curator insight, July 16, 11:19 PM

......................"""""""""""""""""""""""""..................

 

.............. 

Seth Dixon's insight: 

The question, "what time is it?" does not have one right answer.  The correct answer is dependent on your location on the Earth and the cultural and political conventions of the society in which live.  Don't mistake a cartoon for a map without substance.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, July 17, 5:44 PM

VISUALIZANDO TIEMPO Y ESPACIO

sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 6:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

I used to teach students about the surprising water crises in central and SE Wisconsin, one of the most water-rich states in the US. They were always blown away. Now, teaching in CO, everyone seems to have an awareness (anxiety?) about local water scarcity. This story, though, has more of a national, even global scope. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 7:06 AM

This isn't new, but it is a new development that the media is covering the issue that has been going on for decades.  The Ogallala aquifer is the primary water source in an agricultural region  from Texas to Nebraska in dry, but agriculturally productive states.  The reason behind their agricultural success in the dry high plains is that more water is being extracted from the aquifer than is naturally being replenished.  This is the obvious result of a human-environmental interaction where the individual actors are incentivized to deplete a communal resource.      


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesswater, environment, resources

Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 3:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, Today, 7:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

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The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest

The American Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest | MS Geo | Scoop.it
After three decades of slow growth, middle-class incomes in the U.S. appear to trail those of Canada. Poor Americans now make less than the poor in several other countries.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

This shift is the result of policy choices:  The long march away from progressive taxation, regulation, labor unions in the context of globalization, while avoiding any middle-class boosting programs due to the specter of deficits and debt.

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | MS Geo | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”

 

I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


Via Seth Dixon, Cory Erlandson
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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 7:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Watch Your Name Grow and Shrink in Popularity Across the U.S.

Watch Your Name Grow and Shrink in Popularity Across the U.S. | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Tracking the spread of 29,000 baby names over the past century.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

It might be interesting to research causes of name spikes throughout history. I think there is a clear Haim/Feldman related spike in Corys in 1986-88.

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Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now

Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The places creative, service, and working class jobs will grow the most by 2022.
Cory Erlandson's insight:

It's not just "what" to do, but also "where."

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.  

 

At some point in all of our lives our perception of the world began to change- our knowledge of the world, from school or personal travel experience, began to grow in our minds a map of the world which started to encompass more than just our hometowns and the surrounding suburbs. Soon this mental map started to include nearby states or territories, other countries, and slowly but surely a global mental map was created in each of our minds, unique and personal to every one of us.


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In Pictures: Palestinian parkour

In Pictures: Palestinian parkour | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Flying high over Jerusalem, young men engaged in the daredevil sport are winning over tourists.

 

Walking down the narrow streets of the Old City of Jerusalem, silhouettes of young men fly over market stalls in the souk. These daredevils are Palestinians practicing parkour, the death-defying sport combining gymnastics, acrobatics, running and jumping.

Developed in northern France in the 1990s, parkour participants perform in all types of urban environments, using only their bodies to leap, flip, and overcome obstacles. The sport also borrows elements from martial arts, rock climbing and other athletic fields.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 9:59 AM

This is a fine example of how a sport/performance can merge with place to create and enhance the cultural meanings in the actions. 

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Crimea, the Tinderbox

Crimea, the Tinderbox | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The West and Russia have a common interest: forestalling civil war in Ukraine.

Via Allison Anthony, geo-pickmeup.com
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 2, 12:57 PM

This is a great history of the region and a scary picture reminiscent of Hitler in 1938!

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Google highlights specialized maps from around the world in new ...

Google highlights specialized maps from around the world in new ... | MS Geo | Scoop.it
In December, Google collaborated with National Geographic to bring more than 500 of the magazine's historic maps online. The effort was created through Google Maps Engine, which lets third-party...
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Google Maps Gallery debuts as Web's interactive digital atlas ...

Google Maps Gallery debuts as Web's interactive digital atlas ... | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The tech giant partners with governments and organizations to publish hundreds of historic and informative maps that anyone can explore. Read this article by Dara Kerr on CNET News.
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Ukraine Crisis in Maps

Ukraine Crisis in Maps | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Russian forces in Crimea, protests and some of the political, cultural and economic factors in the crisis.
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China helps North Korea despite human rights violations - Madison.com

China helps North Korea despite human rights violations - Madison.com | MS Geo | Scoop.it
China helps North Korea despite human rights violations
Madison.com
On Feb. 19th, the United Nations provided a report on inhumane atrocities taking place in North Korea.
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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


Via Seth Dixon
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Nice intersection of geo and economics (for the social studies teachers out there) on a very high-interest topic.

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Victor LS's curator insight, July 22, 4:08 PM

A good market lesson brilliantly explained!

Kelsea Messina's curator insight, July 23, 6:45 AM

Hotelling method

Nancy Watson's curator insight, Today, 7:02 AM

Hoteling model

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:31 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of population pyramids because it gives a compelling explanation of how to interpret population pyramids and why they are significant for extrapolating into the future.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 3:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:41 AM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

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China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years

China on course to become 'world's most Christian nation' within 15 years | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The number of Christians in Communist China is growing so steadily that it by 2030 it could have more churchgoers than America

Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 28, 12:48 PM

Religion...

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 11:27 AM

Another example of how one thing can begin in one region, go to another, then another, and then find a new identity as its previous one fades away. As part of what can be said to be a "devlopment" cycle, as a nation goes past manufacturing and into the services sector as well as its populace becoming more secular, the leaders of the church still need to bring in wealth for their coffers. What the missionarys started under colonialism is perhaps starting to pay off. Culture travels just as traded commodities does, by having peoples from different places inter-mingle and the largest motivator of that is global trade bringing people that ordinarily would not have met, together. Or in some cases, bible toting missionaries attempting to "civilize" a "primitive" people. If Jesus doesnt work, there is always opium.. again.

Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, May 13, 1:07 PM

It's interesting to think there are those who believe crime will diminish because there are more Christians.  I guess that's an infusion of Confucian morality and hope into their Christian ideals.  I hope that this will pave a way for the growth of human rights and more political freedom for China.

 

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What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | MS Geo | Scoop.it

"In symbolic terms, it's a huge loss. The Crimean Peninsula holds an important place in the region's history, and the inability to prevent the region from joining Russia is a serious test of leadership for the new Ukrainian government in Kiev.

In practical terms, however, what Crimea means for Ukraine is less clear. In an article last week, The Post's Will Englund noted that Crimea may end up costing Russia more than it might like. And what does Ukraine really lose?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 9:35 AM

We often view global affairs through our own little prism, considering how it affects us.  So much of the discussion has revolved around Russia and the West in general (and the U.S. specifically), that Ukraine almost gets lost in the shuffle.  All this amid news that the acting Ukrainian Foreign Minister has said that the possibility of war "is growing."

Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon, Anna Hoppe
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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 7:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 7:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble?

What Country Does Your State's Life Expectancy Resemble? | MS Geo | Scoop.it
How California and Virginia can be as different as Liechtenstein and Brunei
Cory Erlandson's insight:

Helpful context for international development indicator.

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A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism

A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Published in 1941, this “Trading Game: France—Colonies” aimed to teach French children the basics of colonial management. 

 

Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,” Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.


Via Seth Dixon
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Understanding The Crisis In Ukraine

Understanding The Crisis In Ukraine | MS Geo | Scoop.it
Tensions are running high between Ukraine and Russia following the ouster of Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych and the invasion of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula by Russian forces.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 6:06 PM

The Onion can certainly deliver...this is a mixture of geopolitical humor and a pithy spoof of the new internet reporting style.  They also poke fun at American ignorance/apathy towards foreign affairs in this additional article.  These issues in Ukraine are no laughing matter, but for some like Seinfeld, that's a natural way to deal the issue.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | MS Geo | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon
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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 3:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 9:38 AM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

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25 Places That Are Suspiciously Blurry On Google Maps

Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/mzLWX Whether due to security or paranoia, there are many places on Google Earth that you won't be able to go pea...
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What the Internet looks like: The undersea cables wiring the ends of the Earth - CNN.com

What the Internet looks like: The undersea cables wiring the ends of the Earth - CNN.com | MS Geo | Scoop.it
The information age is powered by fiber-optic cables buried in the sea bed. This incredible map reveals the sprawling network of the underwater Internet. (These amazing maps show what the internet really looks like.
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Ukraine, Crimea, and Washington's Pointless Geo-Political Contest ...

In response to the revolution in Ukraine, Moscow has ordered a 150,000-troop Russian military exercise in the semi-autonomous region of Crimea, right on Ukraine's border. Amid the commotion, pro and anti- Russian ...
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