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Cartography And Conflict

Cartography And Conflict | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
A newly issued Chinese passport featuring a map that lays claim to disputed territory with several neighboring countries is only the latest case of cartographic aggression.

 

"Maps, like statistics, can lie — or at least tell only one side of the story. As often as not, they can belie the level of actual governmental control or the ethnic and social realities on the ground. And competing views over 'who owns what' invariably fuel nationalistic fervor."


Via Seth Dixon
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:22 PM

Maps can lie, or at least only tell one side of a story. China sparked an international uproar over their new passports that features a map of China. The map includes territories claimed by India, Vietnam, the Philippines and Taiwan.

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

The article points out various cases in which cartography has been used not to show geographical data and the boundaries of different countries, but had rather been used to show political ambitions. Some examples are the map of Guatemala that included Belize as part of it, which dates from a decades-old territorial dispute between the two countries; the recent approved Chinese passport, which includes a map of the country that contains territory claimed by India, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Taiwan; and the different maps published by Peru and Chile that included different sea borders, an issue that dates back from more than 100 years.

Reflection- as the article says, "maps, just as statistics, can lie". It is crucial for people not only to know how to interpret maps, but also to be aware of their source and the history behind a map drawn in a different way. I think maps, in order not to be misleading, should show updated information of the boundaries between countries, and should not, by any means, show the territorial desires of a particular country.

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:40 PM

now this is really interesting to see how china issues passports for disputed territories which they claim to be theirs, i can definitely see why places would be upset about this and how this map can be seen as incorrect.

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


Via Seth Dixon, Mrs. Dunken
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:40 PM

now this is really interesting to see how china issues passports for disputed territories which they claim to be theirs, i can definitely see why places would be upset about this and how this map can be seen as incorrect.