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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

So many articles about organic or genetically engineered foods are written with someone with a very defined position on the subject (much like abortion, gun control or other controversial topics).  This article is an attempt to separate out the good the bad and the ugly regarding genetically engineered foods.   

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:00 PM
unit 5
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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Thanksgiving Maps

Thanksgiving Maps | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University).


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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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Global food crisis

Global food crisis | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?