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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 1:02 PM


Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map diplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you think the sub-text to this map is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post


Tags: cartography, China, borders.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 1:02 PM


Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map diplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you think the sub-text to this map is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post


Tags: cartography, China, borders.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future.