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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Downtown LA: Always Changing

Downtown LA: Always Changing | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

"The Los Angeles of America’s imagination is rarely downtown Los Angeles. When we envision L.A., we think of the beach, 15 miles away, or the starred sidewalk of Hollywood, or the sprawling suburbs of the San Fernando Valley. While not the center of our Los Angeles, downtown Los Angeles is nonetheless visible —it is a backdrop to films and television shows set in L.A., and, just as frequently, serves as Any City, U.S.A., easily transformed into New York City, Washington, D.C., and the generic cities of car, cell phone, or drug store commercials."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 10:54 AM

This AAG annual meeting will be in Los Angeles this year, and geographer Jennifer Mapes gives readers a virtual walking tour of downtown LA before thousands of geographers converge on the city.


Tags: Los Angeles, AAG, urban, landscape.

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Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050

Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050 | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050
Ars Technica
The Internet of Things will be ubiquitous, Arup suggests; presumably to the point that it has been abbreviated simply to "things," the "Internet of" having been long since forgotten.

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, February 24, 2013 12:50 AM

Is this the future for the sustainable urban area? Can this be overlaid on our exisiting urban areas? Does it only have relevance in new Ecocities?

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One Child Policy - China

August 2005 China's controversial one child policy has stemmed population growth but at what cost? From forced abortions to heavy fines, many have suffered. ...

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MsHaeussinger's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:56 AM

In class video on Fri. Feb. 8th

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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Expat Explorer Survey

Expat Explorer Survey | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
If you were moving abroad, what would you want to know? Find out the results from the largest ever global independent survey of expats. Gain a unique insight into how expat life differs across the globe.

 

The labor market is increasingly becoming a global market.  These countries are the leading places for expatriate workers based on economic and experience factors (according to a survey by HSBC).  You can adjust the criteria to see how these 30 countries as destinations for workers that aren't afraid to move internationally.

 

Tags: labor, globalization, industry, economic.


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ExpatsLivingAbroad's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:13 PM

Things you need or want to know in advance of selecting a new place to live!

ExpatsLivingAbroad's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:49 PM

Check out the responses from the survey

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Life expectancy at birth by country - Thematic Map - World

Life expectancy at birth by country - Thematic Map - World | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

Demographic site where you can see thematic maps based on demographics of your choosing....


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Geocube - The world of Geography at your fingertips

Geocube - The world of Geography at your fingertips | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

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Freedom of the Press

Freedom of the Press | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

"Freedom House has been at the forefront in monitoring threats to media independence since 1980. A free press plays a key role in sustaining and monitoring a healthy democracy, as well as in contributing to greater accountability, good government, and economic development. Most importantly, restrictions on media are often an early indicator that governments intend to assault other democratic institutions." 

 

This interactive map shows some intriguing spatial patterns about the freedom of press internationally.  What other patterns to you see in matching up with the most free presses in the world (in green)?  How does a free (or not free press) influence the cultural and political values of a country? 


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My Fair Lady part 1

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.


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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

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The Geography of a Pencil

A film from the Competitive Enterprise Institute, adapted from the 1958 essay by Leonard E. Read.

 

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:17 PM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
more...
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:41 PM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 1, 2013 11:41 AM

Watch this HUGGERS for a great review!

Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

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In China, Signs One-Child Policy May be Coming to an End

In China, Signs One-Child Policy May be Coming to an End | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Country's working-age population fell for first time in 2012

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Mariah Kieffer's comment, March 15, 2013 11:12 AM
I also am glad. It seems so wrong to kill kids, when they have no say. China may have a huge population issue, but i agree that there should be more options then back-alley abortions. In china, giving birth to a boy is wanted, so sometimes the family will have abortion if they found out the gender was female. Both sexes should be acceptable.
Brittany Turany's comment, March 16, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel this is a positive thing. Many deaths have occured due to this. I know that they do have a population issue, but I don't think limiting the number of children is a good way to solve it. I don't know what would be better, but I feel there must be a better way. I am glad to see it ending because it gives people an opprotunity to have the freedom of having a large family if they want to.
Camille Fawcett's comment, March 17, 2013 1:16 AM
Just like all of you guys have commented, I am relieved that they will be taking this law away as well. Reading about the woman who was forced to abort her baby really angered me. I feel like that is not fair at all to the citizen. It denies her, her natural rights. Obviously, China doesn' t have the same laws as we have, but I believe that they should. People should have the choice of what to do with their own child. An unborn child is so much more than just all the expenses and consequences it would invoke. Unborn children are the hope, the future. We shouldn't be killing them off so easily.
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Living Geography: Show off your classroom...

Living Geography: Show off your classroom... | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

If you've produced a classroom display that you're proud of, why not share it with others. You can do this on a new FLICKR group that has been started by Victoria Ellis.


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William Pattison - 4 Traditions of Geography

This article is a classic; one of the most well-cited articles from the Journal of Geography.  

 

Tags: Geography Education, Geography, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples


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Jessica L. Price's comment, July 11, 2013 10:06 AM
This made it easier for me to understand the four traditions! Thanks!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 2013 9:02 AM

This article is a classic; one of the most well-cited articles from the Journal of Geography.  


Tags: Geography Education, Geography, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

RachaelDurbin's curator insight, July 4, 1:23 PM

Great for Unit 2: Part 1

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A Sense of Place

A Sense of Place | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
THERE WAS SOMETHING odd about the black car at the junction of Sutter and Hyde Streets. It was an ordinary saloon. Its windows were clear, and it looked in good...

 

Technologies today have allowed us to be digitally connected from anywhere.  This impacts geographic patterns from outsourcing to local businesses that rely on interpersonal communications to connect potential demand with resources.  Some may see this as geography becoming less of a barrier, and consequently, less relevant.  This article in the Economist argues that as these technologies have rendered location more important than ever since they rely on geospatial technologies.  "The reports of the death of distance have been much exaggerated." 

 

Tags: technology, globalization, location, place.


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Global food crisis – interactive

Global food crisis – interactive | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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21 Accents

Here's a little tour of 21 accents in one take. Love the fun challenge of switching between them fluidly. Props to All of these places and their multi-accent...

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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 


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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Mrs.DunkenGeography | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


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