MrsWunder's Blog
123 views | +0 today
Follow
MrsWunder's Blog
Share with Enrichment Students
Curated by Dana Wunder
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

Via Joel Barker, Seth Dixon
more...
Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season

Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
10 ways to go green this holiday season. Zero Waste holiday tips from Eco-Cycle.

 

This infographic combined with these recommendations are some simple reminders that mass consumption and waste does not contribute to global joy or cheer. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mary Rack's comment, November 25, 2012 8:10 PM
I shared this on Facebook and Google+. Hope for lots of readers and followers!
Seth Dixon's comment, November 25, 2012 8:36 PM
Thanks Mary!
Javier Curso CFIE's curator insight, April 8, 2013 7:37 AM

beautiful, as Susan

Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:45 PM

It is fascinating to see how life evolves differently on isolated islands. The unique biomes often lack enough diversity to fill certain roles, so the animals move to fill them. For example, the komodo dragon was able to evolve to its large size because there was not large predator sitting on top of the food chain to prevent its growth. Sadly, the unique nature of island biogeography also makes it much more delicate, and species are much more likely to become extinct.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:35 PM

There are times where I wish certain species don't spread.  Other times I understand the migration and think it's great.  If humans died out then I believe all species would flourish just as Sir Ken Robinson says.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:06 PM
Island Biogeography is the theoretical explanations as to why species occurs, it also studies the species composition and species richness on an island.. it is not specific to land masses around water. Isolation gives species a strong place in their environment. The fact that new species and things show up are amazing, but sometimes new species are not properly adapted because there is no other general force against them and they do not ever learn to defend themselves.
Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.