MrsWunder's Blog
Follow
Find tag "density"
41 views | +0 today
MrsWunder's Blog
Share with Enrichment Students
Curated by Dana Wunder
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Changing Earth

Changing Earth | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 4:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 8:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:37 PM

I enjoyed looking at each shape of the countries and seeing howmany people lived in a certain area. To me it seems like the US has a lot of people living in a certain area compared to other countries states. It is also shocking that millions of people can live in a smaller area. 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 9:45 AM

Interesting comparison of cities and their urban footprints

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:41 AM

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

Rescooped by Dana Wunder from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | MrsWunder's Blog | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.