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Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas

Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas - Organic agriculture is a growing trend in big cities around the world, including Latin America, and no...

 

This article nicely ties two commonly taught issues in human geography that aren't the the typical combination: 1) the growth of organic farming and 2) the spread of squatter settlements and slums in the developing world. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities. 


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:03 AM

This is a new trend spreading to Brazil. Now with the organic craze that has been going around in past years farmers have sought out way to grow their food more organically. This also allows poor areas to benefit from organic farming because it is now present in their area and they can no buy food that is good and of their choice. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:19 PM

Seeing how even Urbanized areas of the world can get into agriculture shows that you do not need to have geographic land advantage to grow crops. The Brazilian favelas are getting into agriculture to bring extra income and a sense of community to the area, getting more agriculture into these urban areas will be aided by the government in order to keep the urban agriculture movement growing

Tiphaine Graton's curator insight, October 12, 2016 3:54 AM
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Drought impacting Agriculture & Economy

Drought impacting Agriculture & Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Citing higher cheese prices, Colbert states it plainly:..."

 

Although in America today only about 2% of the workforce is involved in agriculture, crop cultivation is still tightly integrated within our economy affecting a much wider range of people and industries.  According to the US Department of Agriculture we our currently experiencing one of the worst droughts in our nation’s history rivaling the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s. On a national scale, prices in gas, meat, dairy and other products that depend on crops will likely increase. However, since the U.S is a major producer of crops such as wheat and corn, the global economic consequences of this will be felt around the world. How will an increase in food prices effect people in countries were a quarter or more of their income goes towards groceries? How will a decreasing agricultural yield effect economic and political stability around the world?  This is a humorous look at a very serious problem. 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 30, 2012 11:48 AM
With fuel already a huge issue, now we will have the added costs of water shortage on our hands. It's an unfortunate deal, but cost is always passed on to the consumer. You can see it in many products today, smaller portion yet higher price. It shall be the same with anything in those regions effected by the drought.