Mrs. Watson's Class
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 11, 2013 8:48 PM

Little bit different to my school:)

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Flags Quiz

Flags Quiz | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Like a flag, can you represent? From the most famous flags to the more obscure, challenge your knowledge of flags from around the world in our fun Flags Quiz!

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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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Where The Hell Is Matt? (Video)

Where The Hell Is Matt? (Video) | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This is truly horrific dancing with high comedic value and engages students.  However, the cultural icons, environmental settings and social context within which these images are spliced make this more than just "fluff" piece to distract the students. 

"Dancing Badly Around the World."


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Video: MOVE

3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage...

 

Here is an excellent video that inspires students to see the world and learn about the people and cultures from far of places. 


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Frédéric Pouget's comment, October 29, 2011 3:42 AM
You can check the older Matt's video on the same topic: http://www.scoop.it/t/geomatique/p/598907977/where-the-hell-is-matt-2008
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"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage." 

This video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world.   Geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures and other ways of doing things.  In a three part series including 'Eat' and 'Move.' 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.

 

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

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Points out how ethnocentric we are thinking everyone has what we have.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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Time Zones

Time Zones | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:07 PM

Coordinating a meeting across time zones can be confusion logistical task and one that people rarely can do off the top of their head or consulting some resources.  It is, however, fundamentally a geographic task.  Our friends at the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute put together this collection of 5 maps (and this time zone converter) to help global collaboration.

Louis Culotta's comment, February 27, 2013 3:16 PM
good info...I use a app on my phone most of the time for this info.
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World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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LEARN

"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage..."  With the start of a new school year, I feel this video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.

 

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7 Billion: Are You Typical? -- National Geographic Video

7 Billion: Are You Typical? -- National Geographic Video | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This video is a powerful way to show global patterns of development, culture and economic as well as population.  For more produced my National Geographic about population, visit: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/7-billion This was created to coincide with the arrival of the world's 7 billionth person on October 31, 2011.


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Where is Matt?

Just in case you've never seen it, this is my favorite "horrible dancing" video.  Filmed in over 40 countries, the dancing is just a silly prop for the realy unfolding drama.  The gorgeous cultural and physical landscapes literally take center stage in this production.  The cultural icons, environmental settings and social context within which these images are spliced make this more than just "fluff" piece to distract the students.  It's a clip that can instill a desire to travel the world over to gain more geographic knowledge. 


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Lanastasiou's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
very funny video and it was interesting to see how each culture has their unique style of dancing!