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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Whether global warming or just one of the heat and cooling cycles, this drought is extensive and making an impact on food prices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

hailey thornton's curator insight, August 21, 10:19 AM

this is a map that shows the  drought in the united states of america. 

over the past decade the drought has gotten ever so more drastic. most of the drought is in the central parts  and the west coast of america .I  assume  that as the years progress the conditions for these parts of america will only progress to worsen. 

                  ~h.t.

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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:21 AM

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 9:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.
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NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

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Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico

Drought Fuels Water War Between Texas and New Mexico | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
As climate change alters rainfall patterns and river flows, tensions are bound to rise between states and countries that share rivers that cross their borders. In the Rio Grande Basin of the American Southwest, that future inevitability has arrived.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 13, 2013 7:34 PM
Even in the US water supply can still be an issue.
Kate Makin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 7:23 AM

Social Impact

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 11:57 PM

Both Texas and New Mexico share the water supply that is giving by the rivers that cross between the border and can have a profound effect on the growth of farmland and agriculture of both Texas and New Mexico, which shows that many places can be effected by the geography that is intertwined among places in the world.*

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:33 PM

The transformation of Saudi Arabia's greenery is a smart idea and I can imagine incredibly beneficial.  We always hear about not wanting to be oil dependent on a foreign countries.  What do oil rich countries say?  Well, Saudi Arabia found a solution for not wanting to be dependent on foreign countries for their agricultural needs.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 26, 9:37 PM

From 1987-2012 NASA has been recording some very strange topography from satellite imaging. Green patches have been presenting themselves as a result of deep oil drilling. In search of fossil fuels far below the desert's crust, water reserves have been located. These water reserves are believed to have been trapped from the last Ice Age. It is because of this discovery that these water reserves have been tapped and irrigation has taken place.Irrigation is being used to water fields with a sprinkler system. This process is known as center-pivot irrigation. Although experts do not know how much water could be below the surface, it is estimated it may only be enough to last for 50 years. With this estimation this may only be a temporary aid to this otherwise dry country.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 1:52 AM

It's amazing to see how Saudi Arabia is able to transform an area once categorized by it's dryness and lack of vegetation is now being Terra-formed into a green area. This shows what huge amounts of money can do, physically alter the earth and landscapes. Because of the massive amounts of oil available to the Saudi's they are able to ship in a more valuable resource, water.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.