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How to reinvent the apartment building

How to reinvent the apartment building | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In 1967, Moshe Safdie reimagined the monolithic apartment building, creating “Habitat ’67,” which gave each unit an unprecedented sense of openness. Nearly 50 years later, he believes the need for this type of building is greater than ever. In this short talk, Safdie surveys a range of projects that do away with the high-rise and let light permeate into densely-packed cities.
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Miami, the great world city, is drowning while the powers that be look away

Miami, the great world city, is drowning while the powers that be look away | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Low-lying south Florida, at the front line of climate change in the US, will be swallowed as sea levels rise. Astonishingly, the population is growing, house prices are rising and building goes on. The problem is the city is run by climate change deniers
Nancy Watson's insight:

Miami May be first, but if climate chane IS real the rest of most of Florida won't be far behind. 

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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 10:19 PM

One of the great results of the decennial census is that geographers, demographers, sociologists, urbanists and countless others, can track the same population or spatial pattern and note historical changes over a 10 year span.  This series of maps and charts highlights some of the major changes.  You shouldn't be surprised that Atlanta is the United States' most sprawling major city and that San Francisco is the most compact, but this article dives beneath surface in a way that is still very accessible.   


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhoodplanning, densityplanning

François Arnal's curator insight, June 7, 2:18 AM

L'étalement urbain aux Etats Unis.

 

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America's Biggest Metros Are Growing Much Faster Than Other Cities

America's Biggest Metros Are Growing Much Faster Than Other Cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The population of cities with more than a million people jumped 3.2 percent, much better than the 2.4 percent for the U.S. overall.
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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.

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Our future in cities

Our future in cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Why Gentrification Is So Hard to Stop

Why Gentrification Is  So Hard to Stop | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Gentrification isn't new -- it's actually baked into the economic forces that have been driving urban development since the 1950s.
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Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies

Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China is undergoing a surprising reverse migration: As millions leave to find work in the cities, some well-educated urban dwellers are relocating to small towns.
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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting comparison of cities and their urban footprints

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:49 PM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

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The Surprising Cities Leading America's Start-Up Revolution

The Surprising Cities Leading America's Start-Up Revolution | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Some small cities rival blockbuster hubs like San Jose and Boston.
Nancy Watson's insight:

I wonder if it is coincidence or if the FRQ spurred the number of articles on start ups, venture capital and agglomeration.

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Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees

Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The warmer conditions cities create make plant-eating pests thrive.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Unintended consequences are almost always a surprise, but when considered in context, make sense and probably should have been anticipated.

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 3:19 AM

This video gives a fantastic view into a city with a huge population that now has access to large amounts of automobiles. These traffic jams are pandemic in cities like this across Asia as a whole. While this definitely is extremely chaotic one of the most amazing things is the fact no accidents occur during the video, which is better than can be said for many Rhode Island drivers.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

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Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes

Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
New York City has always been changing. But recently, the city has seen a wave of luxury condos and artisanal cupcake boutiques uproot local delis and dive bars.

To make sure we don't forget the city's past, two New York-based photographers, James...
Nancy Watson's insight:

A picture is worth a thousand words! Gentrification documented in photos

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Notes from the Ironbound: Songs About the Suburbs

Notes from the Ironbound: Songs About the Suburbs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

Urban /suburban music 

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:16 PM

unit 7

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A closer look at communities thriving in unexpected places | TED Blog

A closer look at communities thriving in unexpected places | TED Blog | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In Iwan Baan's TED Talk, he shows 154 images in rapid succession. Here, he lets you spend more time with them, and appreciate the detail.
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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.
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House Rules | This American Life

House Rules | This American Life | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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Looking Down From Space at Shanghai's Awful Heat Island

Looking Down From Space at Shanghai's Awful Heat Island | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
As China suffers through its hottest summer on record, an immense and deadly bubble of heat builds above Shanghai.
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