Mrs. Watson's Class
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London Should Secede From the United Kingdom

London Should Secede From the United Kingdom | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Beyond the stunning act that has become Britain’s vote to leave the European Union lies a deeper message: Democracy is not destiny, but devolution. Ceaseless entropy — the second law of thermodynamics — applies to politics as well. The more countries democratize, the more local populations seek greater self-rule.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 9:17 AM

In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  Using those ideas, Khanna discusses London's options after the recent Brexit vote in this op-ed (this additional article explores the demographic divide on the Brexit vote, especially how many British Millennials feel that their future has been snatched from them).      

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ISIS: A New Threat

ISIS: A New Threat | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

In this lesson, students will:

Explore the role of ISIS in the Middle EastInterpret political cartoons on the U.S. response to ISISIdentify the techniques used by cartoonists to express political opinionMonitor the news media coverage of ISIS over time
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2015 12:29 PM

The Choices Program produces some great materials and this is from their Teaching with the News series.  The newest in the series is a resource guide for the terrorist attacks in Paris.  


Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict, geopolitics, ISIS, Choices.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:32 PM

Guerras

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What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea

What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China has been feverishly piling sand onto reefs in the South China Sea for the past year, creating seven new islets in the region. It is straining geopolitical tensions that were already taut.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, July 31, 2015 10:02 PM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 2, 2015 9:54 AM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

Isabelle McCreless's curator insight, March 12, 3:33 PM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

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10 Countries That May Not Survive The Next 20 Years - YouTube

10 Countries That May Not Survive The Next 20 Years - The future is uncertain, some countries may not survive another two decades. Join us on our speculative...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting look at states that have the potential to break up or gain more sovern 

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


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Nancy Watson's insight:

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates. A photo gallery from the About.com expert Geography GuideSite.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Tiny but proud

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Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin

Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, poppy cultivation and the opium it produces have flourished as poor farmers turn to the profitable crop.
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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Scotland votes "no" on independence, will remain in the UK

Scotland votes "no" on independence, will remain in the UK | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The results of the Scottish independence referendum are in, and the answer is a resounding "no."
The referendum asked only a single question: Should Scotland become an independent country?...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Political Unit. A no vote still results in devolutionary rights offered by the UK.

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Why Democrats Can’t Win the House

Why Democrats Can’t Win the House | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thanks to demographics, the Republicans have a virtual stranglehold on the House of Representatives.

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Nancy Watson's insight:

Demographics and political geography affect elections.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 8, 2014 12:39 AM

The first reaction might be to blame partisan redistricting (a.k.a. gerrymandering) for the the political gridlock between the presidential results and House of Representatives.  Gerrymandering does play a role, but the spatial concentrations and distributions of voting constituencies explain why the Democrats have recently won the popular vote in 5 out of the last 6 presidential elections, but can't control the House of Representatives.  Metro areas are highly left-leaning, currently creating a national majority for Democrats, but that high concentration is a drawback when trying to win a majority of the seats in the House.  This is a good article as a primer for electoral geography.  


Tags: political, regions, spatial, unit 4 political.

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Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises

Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

In a move that has been widely seen as retaliatory, the Russian government has kicked off a series of random checks at McDonald's around the country, and has already shut down four prime locations in Moscow.


Via Allison Anthony, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

This was at one time the largest McDonalds.

 

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, August 23, 2014 8:51 AM
Putin using the Big Mac attack strategy.
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Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Islamic State's capture of the Mosul dam gives it control over the water and electricity supply in northern Iraq."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Geography plays an important part in the success or failure of a state. This gives the insurgents an advantage.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 2014 10:00 PM

This is interesting, ISIS is not only using brute force as a scare tactic, but are also taking hold of natural resources as well.  In taking over the dam ISIS has control of not only a majority of Iraq's water supply but their power supply as well.  They are also threatening employees with loss of pay to do what they want.  Closing off some parts of the dam is preventing water to get to people who are in need.  If the dam was to get backed up too much it could have immediate failure creating a devastating flood wiping out areas of agriculture having the potential for mass civilian casualties.  ISIS is not just taking over everything that they can, but have a method to what they are doing.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 8:14 PM

As the director of the Brookings Institution's Doha Centre in Qatar said, "There's a method in their madness. By gaining control of the area ISIS can flood and destroy homes within the region. Furthermore, they can disrupt the flow of electricity and how the land is irrigated. All of this could cause a great deal of damage to the society. In this light the dam is a pretty important part of Iraq. The fact that ISIS Manipulated he land to their benefit it highly intelligent.  


However, if the dam was in the hand of the United States, the area still isn't completely safe. people would perceive it to be because ISIS would no longer be threatening to use it as an immediate weapon. However, the author noticed that the dam needs constant maintenance and is built on unstable soil. Both of which can cause flooding. In fact, the "worst case scenario" would cause far more damage than ISIS has with the dam. 


Clearly, purposefully using the resources of an area to damage a population is more chilling the a poorly made structure because malice involved. However even in the hands of the United States, the dam shows just how dangerous manipulating nature can be on a local population. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:21 PM

This will have an enormous impact on drought for drinking, agriculture purposes or even the opposite.  This strategy could be used to flood the lands ruining agriculture.

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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This includes the conflicting claims of Korea and Japan over the Dokdo Islands. 

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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 11:29 AM
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Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey

"The curriculum 'Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey' traces the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the birth of the Turkish Republic, and contemporary issues in Turkey. Learn more at www.choices.edu/turkey "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:49 PM

This video is a great introduction to the Choices Program's new unit on Turkey...a country that is truly a bridge between the Middle East and Europe, without being fully in either.   This unique global position makes Turkey a very important country to understand both culturally and politically.


Tags: politicalculture, Turkeyhistorical.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:24 PM

Turkey has always been a country that I find interesting. So many amazing architectural structures and landscapes. I have two friends from high school who work there in the peace corps. I asked them what it's like and they couldn't really describe it. They said it isn't really Arabic but it certainly isn't western either. This was a good introductory video on the area.

Patty B's curator insight, March 11, 12:32 PM
This video definitely demonstrates the importance of Turkey's role in the global community. In a period with so much animosity between the Middle East and the Western world, Turkey, in a way, represents the entirety of the struggle. As a country that is both literally and figuratively teetering between the Middle East and the West, it has significant symbolic meaning. The outcome of the political and social activity in Turkey could mean a great deal in the grand-scheme of Western-Middle Eastern relations. How it practices democracy is critical. It is one thing to hold general elections, but if proper checks and balances do not exists for the elected officials, then democracy really does not exist in its truest sense. 
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Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
THIS year marks a watershed in the annals of bizarre geography. On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Political unit,

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Isabelle McCreless's curator insight, March 12, 3:58 PM

Political unit,

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 11:54 AM

unit 4

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Nigeria’s moment

Nigeria’s moment | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
FIVE-and-a-half decades ago, when Nigeria elected its first government at the end of colonial rule, many expected the country to rise quickly to become Africa’s...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population and political units. Demographic dividend. 

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Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 28, 10:03 AM

Unit 2

Population and political units. Demographic dividend. 

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The Global Struggle to Respond to the Worst Refugee Crisis in Generations

The Global Struggle to Respond to the Worst Refugee Crisis in Generations | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Eleven million people were uprooted by violence last year. Photos and maps show the international response to what has become the worst migration crisis since World War II.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Political unit. 2015 FRQ

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Gerrymandering Visualized

Gerrymandering Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.

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Aaron Burnette's curator insight, February 10, 9:58 AM

Gerrymandering is when a party redraws boundaries so it gains only supportive feedback.

Kiersten Wright's curator insight, February 10, 6:39 PM

I agree that the process should be taken out of human hands. Why not take advantage of the technology we possess? Although the visuals are simplistic, they accurately depict the inequity. Gerrymandering is unfair, and definitely does not reflect the idea of a fair government that we aspire to be. - K.W.

Rylee English's curator insight, February 18, 10:10 AM

this article breaks down gerrymandering through visualizations. after reading this and looking at the visual representations, gerrymandering makes alot more sense. the author did not give information as to consequences or why gerrymandering occurs. RE

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The Islamic State is failing at being a state

The Islamic State is failing at being a state | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across the group’s territory in Iraq and Syria, a breakdown of services and deteriorating living conditions call into question its ability to govern and the sustainability of its ambition.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Elements of a state: boundaries, sovereignty, recognition by other states

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Every state has one governor and two senators, but, in almost every other way, each state’s human geography is different, often wildly so. New Jersey has 15 times more people than Wyoming, despite being one-tenth its size. You can divide the island of Manhattan in two and the top half...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Boundaries, population distribution, representation, there are a lot of ways to look at these maps.

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How America will look in 2060, in 1 amazing GIF

How America will look in 2060, in 1 amazing GIF | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Older. And that should be a good thing for Republicans.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population projections - estimates, best guesses, but provide information that can be reviewed and acted on if desired. The future is not yet written in stone.

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Scotland's Decision

Scotland's Decision | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
From Catalonia to Kurdistan, nationalist and separatist movements in Europe and beyond are watching the Scottish independence referendum closely.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Scotland, the site of nationalist and separatist movements, is one to watch as they vote. What the ramifications would be are yet to be seen

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Barbara Goebel's curator insight, September 13, 2014 12:00 PM

Compare and contrast Scotland's bid for independence with events leading to American independence. How does a culture decide to change its political geography?

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 3:01 PM

It is interesting to see how globalization does as much to bring us together as it does to rip us apart. The exchange of ideas, goods, and people has hugely impacted the lives of everyday citizens and the nations that they call home, where divisions among people are felt more keenly as the competition in today's global economy grows stronger. Catalonia, the region that has done much to keep the economy of the Spanish nation afloat, and Catalans are eager to shed the "dead weight" they feel they are carrying; the Basque region has long since demanded its independence, and we have already seen the fracturing of the Balkans. In some instances, perhaps separation is for the best. However, I feel like these movements are the result of knee-jerk reactions to the current economic climate and deep, underlying hatreds that have no place in the current world order. Spain has been one nation for hundreds of years, as has the United Kingdom; to suddenly dissolve these unions in the name of century-long feuds seems not only unnecessary, but almost child-like. There is enough hatred in the world- why let us continue to divide amongst ourselves when history has shown that people in these regions can coexist and can consistently pull through these difficult periods. It is one thing to be proud of being Scottish- it is another to ignore the economic and political realities of what Scottish independence would bring for its people for the sake of this nationalist sentiment. I, for one, was relieved to see Scotland vote to remain a member of the UK. Separatist movements across the continent have been quieted, if only for another few years.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:16 AM

The Scottish vote for independence would have broken up a modern United Kingdom. Many Scottish folks feel that it is time to separate from a parent country where there are many other countries that are involved. Becoming independent is not an easy task. There has to be a vote and a strong position for those separatists to succeed in getting a victorious vote.

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Both History and Geography explained in these maps

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.