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Mapping the Way to a More Equal World

Mapping the Way to a More Equal World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Inequality isn't just about money. It's also about information. The lack of reliable data about developing countries makes things like development work and disaster relief much harder.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 4:54 PM

There is 'mapping inequality' throughout the world; poorer countries often don't have comprehensive census information and geospatial data.  Crowd-sourced mapping is seeking to change and improve geographic awareness, especially in moments of crisis.  For example the maps of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea were essentially blank at the beginning of the Ebola outbreak but that glaring need meant volunteers were using geographic tools to improve developmental situations by providing more information.


Tagspodcast, disasters, mapping, cartography.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

Via Seth Dixon
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


Via Seth Dixon
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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean?

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With the highest unemployment rate in the U.S. and a mountain of debt, the island is facing a declining population. But those who stay insist they're there for the long haul.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 21, 2013 9:48 PM

The economic stuggles of the Puerto Rican population are driving many of them to head to the states. Puerto Rico currently has the highest unemployment rate in the US at 14 percent and endless debt. There are however those that are there to stay for the long haul. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 2014 2:17 PM

Puerto Rico, is suffering from economic problems. With few exports, lots of imports, the highest unemployment rate in the US, and many market stalls not paying sales tax, Puerto Rico is getting buried in debt. For many Puerto Ricans, particularly educated ones having trouble finding jobs, starting over in the United States has become an increasingly attractive option. For some, coming to the US would make them feel like outsiders and leaving Puerto Rican culture behind feels slightly treasonous.

 

I cannot blame anyone for feeling that way, home is home. But for anyone who has to think about the welfare of their children or family, being able to provide for them is too much to ignore. It is unfortunate that many of these Caribbean islands seem to be having economic problems due to their reliance on imports and cash crops as a result of colonization.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 1:12 PM

It's interesting to see a place like Puerto Rico having these kinds of financial issues.  A place that has so much tourism should be able to capitalize on the fact that so many people come to visit and buy souvenirs and such.  As it was noted though, all this money is untaxed when it is sold from street vendors.  If the government could find a way to tax these goods then this could help.  It is scary to think about how much the economy of Puerto Rico affects our economy.