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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

A modern day health threat that makes me think of the plague. They didn't know what caused the plague or how to stop it. Wonder when we will figure out how to handle Ebola.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:37 PM

Ebola started in western Africa and it spread overseas to the United States more specifically than any other country. It currently affects over 23,200 people in western Africa. To make sure that Ebola is not being spread throughout the whole United States, eastern United States quarantines any visitors or immigrants from West Africa. Eastern United States seems to have the highest rate of ebola because it is closer to Africa. In that case, it can spread westerly un the United States. Perhaps, it could spread to Canada, Mexico or any other country.

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:58 PM

Mortality rates have become overwhelmingly high in many countries. Ethiopia has now found simple health remedies to improve these rates. Many of these poor countries do not have numerous resources or even medication to help them when they are sick. Ethiopia used to have one of the highest child mortality rate in the world. one of the statistics given was very alarming and it stated ""If you were a kid born in 1990 [in Ethiopia], you had a 1 in 5 chance of not surviving to your fifth birthday." This is horrific for children who cannot predict where they are born and raised. Since 1990, Ethiopia has improved that rate by 60%. They havented invested a lot of money but have opened basic clinics with community individuals who are minimumally educated on these matters. Many of these workers have gone through a one-year training but nothing fancy. Many of these clinics have even two rooms and no electricity. Many of these children are finally being treated properly for some basic things that shouldn't be taking their lives. There is a long way to go for improvemnet but as long as their is a will to help these children, this country will vastly improve.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see: http://cee.mit.edu/news/releases/2012/airport-disease-contagion-model


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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Edison High - AP Human Geography
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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Jacquez
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:35 PM

This is amazing!  Although Ethiopia still has a long way to go in the medical field they have made major improvements in the last few years.  The building being used as an office is not anything spectacular by any means but it is helping save lives.  Common ailments that used to be the cause of death of young children are now treatable and children are able to live past their fifth birthday.  This is a big deal for the people in Ethiopia.  This is not any expensive program brought in by the United States, but a government run program created in Ethiopia.  Common remedies are given to children as well as vaccines that are carefully documented for who needs what and when by the people that run the facilities.  Although the program is still improving and it may take a long time for it to become top notch, the improvement that has been because of this is stellar for the circumstances.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:58 PM

Mortality rates have become overwhelmingly high in many countries. Ethiopia has now found simple health remedies to improve these rates. Many of these poor countries do not have numerous resources or even medication to help them when they are sick. Ethiopia used to have one of the highest child mortality rate in the world. one of the statistics given was very alarming and it stated ""If you were a kid born in 1990 [in Ethiopia], you had a 1 in 5 chance of not surviving to your fifth birthday." This is horrific for children who cannot predict where they are born and raised. Since 1990, Ethiopia has improved that rate by 60%. They havented invested a lot of money but have opened basic clinics with community individuals who are minimumally educated on these matters. Many of these workers have gone through a one-year training but nothing fancy. Many of these clinics have even two rooms and no electricity. Many of these children are finally being treated properly for some basic things that shouldn't be taking their lives. There is a long way to go for improvemnet but as long as their is a will to help these children, this country will vastly improve.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:01 PM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.