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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Edison High - AP Human Geography
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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Jacquez
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2:23 PM

This topic goes with our study of HDI HUGGERS

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 6:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 11:42 AM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 4:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:01 AM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


Via Seth Dixon
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No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2:23 PM

This topic goes with our study of HDI HUGGERS

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 6:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 11:42 AM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 4:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see: http://cee.mit.edu/news/releases/2012/airport-disease-contagion-model


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.