Mrs. Watson's Class
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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."


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Harley Bass's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM

This article is connected to human geography by agriculture. We talk and learn about agriculture every day in the class room. I feel like this article is a eye opener to the naive mind of people who do not live in or around food desert areas.

Hailey Austin's curator insight, January 10, 3:22 PM
This is connected to my class because its dealing with agriculture and how they have limited crops. So most of there food is manufactured and unhealthy. I think that food deserts should either be shut down or given better food options.In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of an area with access to a grocery store.
Mitchell Tasso's curator insight, January 11, 8:57 PM

This article/scoop is very intriguing and cool to read. It goes along with the topic of agriculture and describes the 11 facts that it bares about food deserts whether those facts are good or bad. Overall, I liked this scoop because of the 11 facts and the detail that was provided with them.

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G.M.O. Labeling Law Could Stir a Revolution

G.M.O. Labeling Law Could Stir a Revolution | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The new labeling rules may be weak but could be leveraged to push food producers to disclose more about what we eat.
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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2016 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 2016 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."


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Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 2016 9:53 PM
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:56 PM
papa.
Sophie Wilson's curator insight, August 31, 2016 10:33 AM
This video shows the process of potatoes moving from farm to factory in America and how they are turned into chips. It shows how the potatoes are planted, grown and turned into chips. 
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The Geography of Food: An Article Selection

The Geography of Food: An Article Selection | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services
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This article is co-authored by William Moseley, professor at Macalester College and addresses many of the issues in the agriculture unit.

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Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:00 AM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.


Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    


Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economicfood production, agriculture.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 2015 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:31 PM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.

 

Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    

 

Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economic, food production, agriculture.

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China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies

China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than half of the world's pigs are in China. We look at what growing industrial pork production means for China and the world.
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The Green Revolution: Waging A War Against Hunger - YouTube

NHD - Senior Group Documentary 2010 Districts Version Theme: Innovation in History By Anita & Karis
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Students produced Green Revolution project

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What's wrong with what we eat?

What's wrong with what we eat? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
It's easy to worry about food: Are we eating the wrong stuff? What about people who don't have enough to eat? These talks examine the problems -- and some compelling solutions.
Nancy Watson's insight:

A playlist of 9 TED talks about the food we eat

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A Kansas Town Rallies for a Modest Lifeline: A Local Grocery Store

A Kansas Town Rallies for a Modest Lifeline: A Local Grocery Store | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Plains has struggled in ways familiar to many towns in the Midwest. A grocery store, some residents believe, would afford them more than just fresh food.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Urban, agriculture, food desert, rural 

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Tristram Stuart: Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Tristram Stuart: Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.
Nancy Watson's insight:

As our need for food production grows, we need to do a better job of preventing waste. 

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Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food

Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Exploring the historic and old-fashioned side of Seoul along with the ultra-modern side of the South Korean capital.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Visiting Seoul is a cultural experience like no other. The food, the smells, the skyscraper buildings beside palaces, and centuries of history and pride in the long and beautiful history of S.Korea. The city (and the country) are surprising to Westerners for their modern, safe, and welcoming atmosphere

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Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
As fecal waste and bacteria flow from hog lagoons into the water supply, North Carolina is revisiting a contentious battle between the pork industry, health experts and environmentalists.

 

In regions where hog farm density is high, there is an overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters. The presence of mass-scale swine and poultry lots and processing plants in a sandy floodplain – a region once dotted by small tobacco farms – has long posed a difficult dilemma for a state where swine and poultry represent billions of dollars a year for the economy. [Past] hurricane’s environmental impact in North Carolina were so severe in part because of the large number of hog lagoon breaches. Following Hurricane Matthew, the department has counted 10 to 12 lagoons that were inundated, with floodwaters topping the berms and spreading diluted waste.

 

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 


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Origin of crops | CIAT Blog

Origin of crops | CIAT Blog | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:
For the Ag unit. Crop origins. 
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Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data

Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving resources for geography educators." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR


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Happy Thanksgiving to Everyone! Eat up!

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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 4:31 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky?

What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The city's planned FoodPort is part of a trend toward mixed-use food hubs.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agricultural and Industrial Units

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Have we reached 'peak food'? Shortages loom as global production rates slow

Have we reached 'peak food'? Shortages loom as global production rates slow | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The world has entered an era of “peak food” production with an array of staples from corn and rice to wheat and chicken slowing in growth – with potentially disastrous consequences for feeding the planet.
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Malthus right or wrong? Can we continue to grow enough food?

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What nobody told me about small farming: I can’t make a living

What nobody told me about small farming: I can’t make a living | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
People say we're "rich in other ways," but that doesn't fix the ugly fact that most farms are unsustainable
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Hard work, long hours, few if any holidays. A farmer's life is hard. You on the other hand rely on them for everything you eat. 

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:48 PM

Unit 5 Agriculture

     The article explains the story of one small time organic farmer who is struggling to make a living off of agriculture. The woman owns a small farm and grows multiple types of organic foods, but is barely getting by and relies on a second job for income. 

      Commercial Agriculture has taken over the entire agricultural industry and now it has become almost impossible for small local organic farmers to make any money. As the government encourages and subsidizes farmers which grow only one crop, monoculture, crop biodiversity is dying out because GMOs are taking over all seeds. Organic farmers can not make any money, because a few major companies control the entire agriculture industry and our entire food production system. Subsistence farming used to be a way of life, but now it is impossible to do that and live in most parts of our world. 

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Many G.M.O.-Free Labels, Little Clarity Over Rules

Many G.M.O.-Free Labels, Little Clarity Over Rules | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Products described as not containing genetically modified organisms, whether that statement has been verified or not, are increasingly appearing in stores.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Many people say they want labels on GMOs but still support GMOs.  States are beginning to require labels but will that cause confusion if there is not uniformity between states?

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, March 14, 2015 6:33 PM

Unit 5 Agriculture                                                                                                                   This article describes the confusion behind the non-GMO and GMO free labels. Many food products claim to be GMO free, but are really not certified by any organization and have no proof of being non-GMO. The companies just slap on a label saying GMO free, because people are nowadays shifting towards buying non-GMO foods and it increases their sales. However, in reality there is no guarantee that the product you are buying is in fact GMO free.                                                Ever since the start of the Green Revolution and the development of GMOs people have been struggling to identify whether certain foods contain GMOs or don't. Many labels claiming non-GMO have been created, but the credibility of these labels are questionable. The non-GMO project has been working to certify products that are GMO free, but many companies have just created their own labels claiming their product is non-GMO and the consumer has no idea which label is actually true. As genetically modified seeds spread, it will soon be impossible to eat a GMO free diet, because GMOs will be found in everything.

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Printable List of Monsanto Owned “Food” Producers

Printable List of Monsanto Owned “Food” Producers | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In light of the recent public anger over the Monsanto Protection Act, here’s a simple, printable list of companies that use Monsanto products. By avoiding products made by companies on this list, you can help ensure your money isn’t going to Monsanto and also watch out for the health of your family and yourself.
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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Blayze Padgett's curator insight, January 10, 1:03 PM

The article/video relates to AP Human Geography because it involves Thomas Malthus's theory that population is going to surpass food production if we don't fix our priorities. In my opinion this article makes a very valid point that could be true. We don't exactly need to start more farms and spread agriculture, instead, we should pay attention to our priorities and make the right decisions with the food we harvest from agriculture.