Mrs. Watson's Class
Follow
Find tag "economic"
13.9K views | +1 today
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Work on Panama's massive $5 billion Third Locks project is nearly complete.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic init, globalization

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Mapping Freight: The Highly Concentrated Nature of Goods Trade in the United States

Mapping Freight: The Highly Concentrated Nature of Goods Trade in the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Considering the importance of goods trade in the United States, strikingly little is known about which regions trade with one another. This information gap limits the country’s ability to coordinate freight policies and investments. To address this deficiency, Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane analyze domestic and international goods trade data from 2010 in this report.
more...
Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 9:30 AM

Not much is known about which regions trade with one another in the United States. This information gap limits the country’s ability to coordinate freight policies and investments. This article uses data from 2010 and organizes it into charts that clearly show which regions trade with one another and may help policies to be more effective.

 

This article is related to industrialization and economic development through the patterns of trade and how these charts depict the development of the economic system as it expanded in trade and bulk across the country and across the globe. The article also explains some of the laws of trade across cities and regions of the United States.

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

HDI Map

Nancy Watson's insight:

Mapping the Measure of America. Maps of US showing the Human Development Index by state

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

How Your Neighborhood Affects Your Paycheck

How Your Neighborhood Affects Your Paycheck | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The part of town where you live—and especially where you grew up—can profoundly affect lifetime earnings.
Nancy Watson's insight:

urban unit

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:29 PM

APHG- HW Option 2

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 7:51 AM

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Mrs. Watson's World History
Scoop.it!

What Baby Boomers' Retirement Means For the U.S. Economy

What Baby Boomers' Retirement Means For the U.S. Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
For decades, the retirement of the baby boom generation has been a looming economic threat. Now, it’s no longer looming -- it’s here. Every month, more than a quarter-million Americans turn 65. Tha...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

▶ The Bedrooms Of Children Around The World - YouTube

From the book by James Mollison Like BuzzFeedVideo on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/18yCF0b MUSIC All Good https://soundcloud.com/beatfux/all-good Thinkstock Sti...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population. This makes our Ethnocentrism sting. Children of the world do not all get an even shake in life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41 - YouTube

Nancy Watson's insight:

Globalization 

more...
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:01 PM

Unit 1 Globalization

(Key term)

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 4:05 PM

Anyone who has driven through Boston or New York City has shouted inordinate amounts of profanity and expletives at traffic and traffic lights, or wished that they would just get rid of them. In Dhaka, there are over 600 intersections without traffic lights, and with it comes delays, pollution, and in all likelihood, astronomical blood pressure levels. The lack of traffic signals is not the true culprit here, but dense population in the area and, according to locals, rickshaws. Rickshaws move too slowly and block buses and cars from moving. The obvious solution is to build car-only lanes and widen roads, but that cost time and money they country is not willing to invest. In the mean time, Bangladesh is stuck with toxic fumes and road rage. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 8:52 AM

Driving during rush hour in places like Boston, New York, or Los Angeles can be enough to make any American driver impatient and anxious. Multiply that congestion, anger, impatience, and frustration by ten and you'll have some idea of what the traffic situation is like in Dhaka, Bangladesh. As one of the world's megacities, Dhaka has an enormous population that grows more and more every year. Like in every major city, there are millions of people who must get to work, school, the market, and home everyday. Dhaka, however, lacks not only the physical infrastructure to support these commuters, but the political and economic infrastructure as well. Attempts by the government to fix the traffic problem would inevitably alienate everyone from rickshaw drivers to car owners to bus companies to policemen. All of these entities are important components in the everyday commute for citizens of Dhaka. 

 

While this article deals with the traffic problem in Dhaka and Dhaka alone, to think that it is only a problem there would be a grave misjudgment. In a world that is growing faster than it ever has before, new megacities are cropping up all the time. In many cases, these cities can be found in developing countries that are becoming the new centers of industry and trade. As a result, the physical, political, and economic infrastructure to support these enormous population booms just does not exist. Problems that these enormous daily traffic jams produce concern huge losses of money and sharp decreases in quality of life. Poverty and an increase in the number of slums is also a concern, as many workers are forced to live wherever they can so they can walk to work everyday. The traffic problem in Dhaka, therefore, is representative of the problems facing many emerging megacities. Many local and national governments are unable to implement solutions that would have significant impacts on the issues that face their cities. So though Dhaka's traffic problem may seem unique, its causes and potential solutions should be watched closely by other emerging megacities around the world. 

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy

Information clearing house

Nancy Watson's insight:

Great example of vertical and horizontal integration. Some surprises here, although not all are actually owned by the indicated parent company, but do have connections

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 10:00 AM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.


Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    


Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economicfood production, agriculture.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky?

What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The city's planned FoodPort is part of a trend toward mixed-use food hubs.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agricultural and Industrial Units

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Millennium Development Goals Snapshot 2014

Millennium Development Goals Snapshot 2014 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

So much accomplished, but so much more to do to make our planet's people live a decent life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall

The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Instead of abandoning once-thriving suburban malls, owners are sinking millions into risky redevelopments.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Malls -ghettoization to Gentrification?  Urban Unit. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin

Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, poppy cultivation and the opium it produces have flourished as poor farmers turn to the profitable crop.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:29 PM

APHG- HW Option 2

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why are the MINTcountries special?

Why are the MINTcountries special? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"In 2001 the world began talking about the Bric countries - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential powerhouses of the world economy. The term was coined by economist Jim O'Neill, who has now identified the 'MINT' countries - Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey - as emerging economic giants. Here he explains why."

 

Tags: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey, economic, development.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

How not to be ignorant about the world

How not to be ignorant about the world | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Ethnocentricism makes our impressions about the rest of the world wrong.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Scooped by Nancy Watson
Scoop.it!

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

About 1/7 of the world population lives on $1 a day (or LESS)

more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.