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What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky?

What's a Massive Food Wonderland Doing in Louisville, Kentucky? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The city's planned FoodPort is part of a trend toward mixed-use food hubs.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agricultural and Industrial Units

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Millennium Development Goals Snapshot 2014

Millennium Development Goals Snapshot 2014 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

So much accomplished, but so much more to do to make our planet's people live a decent life.

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How Your Neighborhood Affects Your Paycheck

How Your Neighborhood Affects Your Paycheck | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The part of town where you live—and especially where you grew up—can profoundly affect lifetime earnings.
Nancy Watson's insight:

urban unit

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The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 7:51 AM

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

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Why are the MINTcountries special?

Why are the MINTcountries special? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"In 2001 the world began talking about the Bric countries - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential powerhouses of the world economy. The term was coined by economist Jim O'Neill, who has now identified the 'MINT' countries - Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey - as emerging economic giants. Here he explains why."

 

Tags: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey, economic, development.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

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How not to be ignorant about the world

How not to be ignorant about the world | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Ethnocentricism makes our impressions about the rest of the world wrong.

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

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Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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Nancy Watson's insight:

About 1/7 of the world population lives on $1 a day (or LESS)

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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The world's shifting centre of gravity

The world's shifting centre of gravity | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How the world's economic centre of gravity has shiftedIT IS not exactly news that the world's economic centre of gravity is shifting east. But it is striking how...
Nancy Watson's insight:
Interesting graphic for economic unit
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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:53 PM

This map shows the different languages that are used for business dealings in Africa. It is interesting to see that Africa itself has many languages, but not one of them is predominantly used. The two languages that are mainly used in Africa are English and French, with  Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish and a combination of Arabic and French used in Mauritania, while English and French is used in Madagascar.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:48 PM

The English language seems to be spread out mostly throughout central and southern Africa. But I never though of the language of french being taken up by 30% of Africa. When I look at this map, I try to think about how close these languages are to their respective countries. For instance, I would imagine Arabic being closer to the eastern part of Africa since the middle east is closer to Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Also, I would think that the french and spanish languages would be closer to the northern part of Africa since France and Spain are north of Africa.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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HDI Map

Nancy Watson's insight:

Mapping the Measure of America. Maps of US showing the Human Development Index by state

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The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall

The fall — and overhaul — of the American mall | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Instead of abandoning once-thriving suburban malls, owners are sinking millions into risky redevelopments.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Malls -ghettoization to Gentrification?  Urban Unit. 

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Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin

Myanmar Returns to What Sells: Heroin | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Over the past decade, poppy cultivation and the opium it produces have flourished as poor farmers turn to the profitable crop.
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The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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▶ The Bedrooms Of Children Around The World - YouTube

From the book by James Mollison Like BuzzFeedVideo on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/18yCF0b MUSIC All Good https://soundcloud.com/beatfux/all-good Thinkstock Sti...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population. This makes our Ethnocentrism sting. Children of the world do not all get an even shake in life.

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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41 - YouTube

Nancy Watson's insight:

Globalization 

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:01 PM

Unit 1 Globalization

(Key term)

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:19 AM

This video gives a fantastic view into a city with a huge population that now has access to large amounts of automobiles. These traffic jams are pandemic in cities like this across Asia as a whole. While this definitely is extremely chaotic one of the most amazing things is the fact no accidents occur during the video, which is better than can be said for many Rhode Island drivers.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

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10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy

Information clearing house

Nancy Watson's insight:

Great example of vertical and horizontal integration. Some surprises here, although not all are actually owned by the indicated parent company, but do have connections

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Rwanda Reaches for New Economic Model

Rwanda Reaches for New Economic Model | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A country is looking to attract investors, not donors, to transform a tiny rural economy into a financial and high-tech hub for the region.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Rwanda was savaged with a civil war and genocide in the early 1990s and now it is creating an economic model to embrace high tech industry for the region. Progress

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.

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