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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:19 AM

This video gives a fantastic view into a city with a huge population that now has access to large amounts of automobiles. These traffic jams are pandemic in cities like this across Asia as a whole. While this definitely is extremely chaotic one of the most amazing things is the fact no accidents occur during the video, which is better than can be said for many Rhode Island drivers.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:01 PM

Traffic is one of the major problems facing expanding cities, and Dhaka stands as an example of one of the 18 megacities found in low-income countries. Populations will continue to rise, and in places with lax police forces, laws, and infrastructure so will the traffic problems. The many concerned legal institutions involved also make any possible political reform a difficult goal to accomplish. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:22 PM

Poor infrastructure and overpopulation is the primary reason for serious traffic congestion in Dhaka. Walking is always suitable as well as the use of smaller vehicles like motorcycles, that can weave in and out of traffic. The government needs to enforce a strategy to alleviate traffic congestion. An efficent public transportation system would be a good start. 

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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 5:07 PM

McDonald's adjustment to producing a mostly vegetarian menu for locations in India is a smart business move on their part, and once again displays the positive affects of globalization on a company, but may hurt any of the smaller businesses in the area.

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:03 PM

This article was really interesting to read especially because I have been working at a McDonalds for almost three years now. McDonalds is huge franchise that is known all over the world. Of course my McDonald's does not serve anything for vegetarians. India has various reasons for going meatless. One is that cows are sacred to Hindus. Also, Muslims who live in the country do not eat pork. As opposed to my location who has a top seller of a Big Mac, India's top seller is a McAloo Tikki burger. This burger is made out of a potato based patty as opposed to ground beef. The company is also planning to open another vegetarian location.

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The Golden Temple of Amritsar

The Golden Temple of Amritsar | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world.

 

This two-minute video clip is an effective portal to alternative religious traditions on the South Asian subcontinent.   While students might not at first relate to the theologies of diverse religious traditions, they connect with the underlying ethics of many world religions.  This video is an effective tool to help them gain greater cultural understanding and demystify unfamiliar cultural practices. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:25 PM
I like that the Sikh religion allows people of all religions to visit their holy temple. These people seem like good people.
Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 1:18 AM

I was impressed by the fact that the people of the Sikh religion are very accepting of people who remain outside their system of beliefs.  They acknowledge the fact that there are other religions and don't see any reason to treat them with anything but respect.  These people are most definitely good people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:46 AM

This temple is amazing because it is not only a place of worship but also a huge free eatery. This temple plays a role in the poor relief of the area because all poor people are welcome to come and eat. The fact they welcome those of different faiths as well into this temple of worship is something that is really remarkable because of the fear and distrust many faiths seem to have of one another. If only more places of worship acts as this one.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   


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