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What The World Would Look Like If Countries Were Scaled By Population

What The World Would Look Like If Countries Were Scaled By Population | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Redditor TeaDranks has created a super-interesting cartogram in which the size of each country is apportioned according to population. Suddenly, the largest countries in the world don't look so mighty — Russia and Canada, we're looking at you.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Makes the US look less significant

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Nigeria expected to have larger population than US by 2050

Nigeria expected to have larger population than US by 2050 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
UN predicts that Africa – and Nigeria in particular – will be at forefront of huge global population rise over next century
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How America will look in 2060, in 1 amazing GIF

How America will look in 2060, in 1 amazing GIF | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Older. And that should be a good thing for Republicans.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population projections - estimates, best guesses, but provide information that can be reviewed and acted on if desired. The future is not yet written in stone.

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ENGAGE Snapshot: Changing Population Age Structure

Using examples from Thailand and Rwanda, this PRB ENGAGE Snapshot illustrates changing population age structure using population pyramids.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Excellent intro by PRB on demographic structure and population policy using Rwanda and Thailand

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America's Biggest Metros Are Growing Much Faster Than Other Cities

America's Biggest Metros Are Growing Much Faster Than Other Cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The population of cities with more than a million people jumped 3.2 percent, much better than the 2.4 percent for the U.S. overall.
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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
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Nancy Watson's insight:

Aging populations in LDCs? Modern medicine and education at work

 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.

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The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts

The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The world is poised to change dramatically over the next century, and in ways that you might not expect.
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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PRB's 2014 Interactive World Map Now Online

PRB's 2014 Interactive World Map Now Online | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population unit resources. 

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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here-- video of an earlier version is here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 2014 9:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?

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▶ MALTHUS AND POPULATION : TEN MINUTE GUIDE - YouTube

A ten minute guide to the 18th/19th century English classical economist Malthus and his theory of population. Produced for the history and context of journal...
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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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A Strangely Beautiful Map of Race in America

A Strangely Beautiful Map of Race in America | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A story told in dots.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Based on the 2010 census with 1 dot = 1 person when blended shows an interesting shading.

 

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth