Mrs. Watson's Class
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China ends one-child policy after 35 years

China ends one-child policy after 35 years | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Government to allow all couples to have two children as ‘response to an ageing population’ and amid concerns over economy
Nancy Watson's insight:

People are thinking beings. They can make decisions based on their observations, data, or emotions, and they can change those decisions when unintended consequences result. People can adjust which makes predictions just that.

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Isabelle McCreless's curator insight, March 12, 3:52 PM

People are thinking beings. They can make decisions based on their observations, data, or emotions, and they can change those decisions when unintended consequences result. People can adjust which makes predictions just that.

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China's Insatiable Appetite

China's Insatiable Appetite | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
When 1 billion people want to eat a lot of meat, it can be a problem for everyone.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Agriculture Unit. China"s food choices make big impact

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The Entire U.S. Population Fits In These 4 Chinese Provinces. So What?

The Entire U.S. Population Fits In These 4 Chinese Provinces. So What? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In terms of total land area, the U.S. and China are close in size, but the latter's population is more than four times that of the United States. This map shows how the U.S. population fits into four of China's most populous provinces. Taken on its own, however, the map provides a skewed depiction of China's population density.
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Why China Will Reclaim Siberia - NYTimes.com

Why China Will Reclaim Siberia - NYTimes.com | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Like love, a border is real only if both sides believe in it. And on both sides of the Sino-Russian border, that belief is wavering. By Frank Jacobs.
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Navigating the East China Sea

Navigating the East China Sea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How to ease tensions between Beijing and Tokyo over an uninhabited string of islands.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Islands equal territorial rights to the surrounding seas' fishing and natural resources 

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


Via Seth Dixon
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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:39 PM

I remember reading that this was the original location for where the canal to connect the Pacific and Atlantic was going to be, but the technology available at the time made it impossible for the plan to be set into motion. It would be interesting to see if it can be done, as there is a variety of environmental factors at play that would make its construction complicated. I bet the venture would be very profitable for the nation's government, but I doubt that much of this work would end up helping the Nicaraguan people, and it would irreversibly alter the geographic landscape of the surrounding area. I would also be interested to see how the US would react to its construction. China is our biggest economic competitor and not an explicit ally of our's, so I wonder how comfortable the government would be with a Chinese firm exerting so much influence over a region that is very much in our own backyard. Its construction would have a number of political, economic, social, and cultural consequences, not only for Nicaragua, but for Central America and the US as well.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies

Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China is undergoing a surprising reverse migration: As millions leave to find work in the cities, some well-educated urban dwellers are relocating to small towns.
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New Japanese Helicopter Carrier Draws China Warning to Asia

New Japanese Helicopter Carrier Draws China Warning to Asia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China said Asian neighbors must be alert to Japan’s defense buildup after it unveiled a vessel capable of carrying 14 helicopters, the largest Japanese military ship produced since World War II.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting look at the potential for conflict in the East China Sea

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

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What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea

What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China has been feverishly piling sand onto reefs in the South China Sea for the past year, creating seven new islets in the region. It is straining geopolitical tensions that were already taut.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, July 31, 2015 10:02 PM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 2, 2015 9:54 AM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

Isabelle McCreless's curator insight, March 12, 3:33 PM

The claim of ownership to land which remains above water at the low tide level allows the claimant to use the UNCLOS laws for fishing and natural resources in the territorial waters that surround it.

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China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies

China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than half of the world's pigs are in China. We look at what growing industrial pork production means for China and the world.
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‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French

‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than a million Chinese pioneers have built new lives in Africa.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Imperialism? investment?  Opportunity ? For  Chinese? For Africa?

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

It seems that claims are often made to reinforce political claims. conflicting claims are difficult to resolve 

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:44 PM

Not only does China have a strong economic system and the high population in the world, but they also claim South China Sea. Also since they are wealthy, then they hire maritime security to make sure other areas such as the Philippines and Malaysia don't attempt to take over China's seas. Also, the Philippines attempts to battle China over oil and natural gases but they fail against China because China's more populated than the Philippines. The main point of this map is to show how much of the ocean and sea China claims and they claim about 18% of water out of their land population.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:55 AM

At first when looking at this map, it seems just about right knowing that China is a huge territorial country, but we also see that this map, when compared to an older map, is different. In this map, we can see that the islands on the West, China has claimer part of there territory. This is simply an analysis of how China seeks geopolitical power over these islands. The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. These are all individual countries, that have there own culture, language, separate of that of China. The difference between this issue and perhaps that of Catalonia seeking independence over Spain, is that these countries like Malaysia and Brunei are already territorial countries. China is simply showing that they have the power to declare this map, even if its not true. 




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China looks abroad for greener pastures

China looks abroad for greener pastures | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
BEIJING — When Ma Wenfeng was a boy, his father earned so little money growing wheat and corn that the family mainly ate mantou, a steamed bread that is a staple of the poor. The last thing he would have dreamed of was becoming a farmer.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Thanks to Richard Giddens for this post

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China and Taiwan

China and Taiwan | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Will China win its 65-year war with Taiwan -- without firing a shot?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2014 9:45 AM

As one analyst quoted in this article says, the whole point of China's policy is to try to create an environment where the people are Taiwan want to be unified with mainland China.  China has opened up economically towards Taiwan to foster this in "an offer they can't refuse." What would your position on this issue be if you were advising China, Taiwan or the United States?  

Yiannis Tsingos's curator insight, February 15, 2014 4:57 PM

Great resource for conflict resolution

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:40 PM

China and Taiwan have been battling each other without physically fighting for decades. Nowadays someone needs to take charge and eliminate this battle. Can China do it without releasing its militia?

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.
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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots.