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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

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Nancy Watson's insight:

A modern day health threat that makes me think of the plague. They didn't know what caused the plague or how to stop it. Wonder when we will figure out how to handle Ebola.

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Raven Blair's curator insight, August 21, 10:10 AM

I believe that the reason the Ebola outbreak was so bad in West Africa was because of the overpopulation and lack of medical resources. Attempts of containing the virus are being made by asking for the travel history of anyone that comes into the US with a fever. If they had been to West Africa, then they are screened and tested. Alarms have been raised in New York City at 3 hospitals, but no Ebola cases have turned up.

 

~Raven Blair

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, August 21, 10:16 AM

The Ebola virus is a very frightening virus. The fact that there is a chance it could spread to the United States is also scary. Hopefully there will be a cure found for this virus. The side effects of Ebola could be fatal, until there is a cure we should prevent to many trips to areas near West Africa.

Alex Lewis's curator insight, August 27, 9:53 AM

More than 2,600 people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected with the Ebola virus since March. The Ebola Virus is spreading rapidly between not only African and less developed countries, but also being transported to some more developed countries, such as the United States. There are so many different things we have to bring attention to, this included. The people in Africa are transferring the disease more rapidly, in my opinion, due to the lack of medical attention and the lack of space and resources.

                                     Alex Lewis

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


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Nancy Watson's insight:

This is a good practice.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 12:57 PM

This online quiz tests your ability to locate African countries on the map--a basic skill that isn't 'doing geography' (an age-old lament among geography educators).  Still, it is hard to have an intelligent discussion about the continent if you can't name or locate any places other than Egypt and South Africa.  For some of my favorite online map quiz resources, click here.

 

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, August 7, 9:03 AM

Vyskúšajte sa!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:50 AM

APHG-Maps

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The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thought colonialism was over? Our new interactive infographic shows how corporations like Monsanto are scrambling to carve up Africa's food system: http://wdm.li/newscramble
Nancy Watson's insight:

Ah times change, but motives do not.

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‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French

‘China’s Second Continent,’ by Howard W. French | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than a million Chinese pioneers have built new lives in Africa.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Imperialism? investment?  Opportunity ? For  Chinese? For Africa?

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The dividend is delayed

The dividend is delayed | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
HOW unusual is Africa’s demography? If you take a selection of countries, from Algeria and Tunisia in the north to Botswana and South Africa in the south, you may...
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Gambia president rejects English language

Gambia president rejects English language | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
President's decision to shift official language from English to local language comes months after its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth

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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:27 PM

I think it's great that the President of Gambia wants to change the official language from English to the local language. The West African country announced it is withdrawing from the Commonwealth which is a group of 54 nations which made up largely of former British colonies, hence why these colonies speak English. If the people want aren't using English primarily and they're using another language, that is rooted to the culture of Gambia, then maybe it's time to consider having two official languages.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:49 PM

Gambian president wants his nation to have a sense of identity. Conforming to the English language and making that the primary language of the country has set a drawback on what he wants his country to be. He says they should speak their local language and that to be a leader you don't have to speak English. I think speaking the local language is a great idea but also knowing the English language is very beneficial.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:14 AM

culturally it would be a good idea to switch the official language to a local language that way their langueages dont become dead languages but economically its not a good idea because Americas dominate language is English and it is also an economic power.

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:23 PM

This topic goes with our study of HDI HUGGERS

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 9:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

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This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa

This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This graph is worth as many as you can take out of it.
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


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FARM-Africa Cassava project

A short film showing the work of FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) in Uganda. The National Farmers Union (NFU) is working with FARM...

 

The Green Revolution is (belatedly) impacting Africa.  Notice the cultural environment within which agriculture takes place here.   What are the gendered differences in the production of food?  What impact does that have on society?


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:29 PM
Wow not just the men in the video are working this hard, but women and children as well. It makes you think how much we have as Americans and how much we take everything for granted. These African people are tough, they have to do so much more to survive than we do.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 10:46 AM
This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.
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8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist

8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa has one of the youngest and fastest-growing consumer markets in the world.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Africa is a continent to watch. It has the potential to begin an economic break through on a global scale. I used to say watch China. Now I think it is Africa 

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Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

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The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030

The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
New York, Osaka, and Sao Paulo won't even make the top 10.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Good article for the Urban Unit. Mega cities of the world are growing in Asia and Africa as some MDC are seeing a decline in population and more slowly growing cities.

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Africa borders

Africa borders | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
about history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about african borders
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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:30 PM

It's interesting to see years after colonialism and imperialism there the nations it colonized are still having contact with their 'mother country'. For example the countries of Angola and Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau gained independence in the 1970's and they still trade with Portugal and are dependent on one an other to an extent, and language definitely has something to do with it.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:46 PM

Africa is a huge continent filled with tons of countries. Language is widespread even within a city or town. Throughout Africa, there is no denying that the languages vary drastically. All the languages however are among the most spoken languages in the world. More business for Africa!

The ServiceMag's curator insight, September 9, 12:30 PM

The 'Other' category is much underestimated. Therefore, incorrect!

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Jacquez
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:23 PM

This topic goes with our study of HDI HUGGERS

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 9:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:42 PM

Education makes a huge difference in the health of poor nations. All they needed was to educate a few citizens on the basics of diseases endemic to the region and they have seen significant improvement in the health of the citizens.

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125 years of the Berlin Conference

125 years of the Berlin Conference | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
THE BERLIN CONFERENCEThere is no single event in modern African history whose consequences have been as dire for the continent as the Berlin Conference of 1884-85, reports New African.
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
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Aging populations in LDCs? Modern medicine and education at work

 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:15 AM

Fascinating interactive map looking at the separatist movements in Africa.  

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:00 PM

It seems as though African countries are actually trying to go back to their pre-colonial boundaries. The agreement they made to respect the old colonial borders to avoid war has never been effective.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement ...

 

Community, agriculture, gender, politics and the environment... it's all here in this inspiring clip.  


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:22 PM

This is such an inspiring video. All it took was for one women, Wangari Maathai, to have an idea and to stand up for that idea for change to take place. How cool that from that one women a government was changed at 35 million trees planted!

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:02 PM

To me seem that it was more than just planting trees. Is was a way for this woman to have some type of control. Their story show how nothing is impossible, that sometimes we think that whatever little thing we do, it would not make a different. Those woman illustrate that no matter how powerless you feel. If you believe in something no stop until you get it accomplished.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:20 AM

It seems that the people depend on planting. it also hurts that these people have little access to water. Where other parts in this world there is too much water and it is hurting the people. It is devastating what is happening to them. The trees that are planted could help them get water in some kind of way. But it might take them a while because to grow a tree it takes years to grow.