Mrs. Watson's Class
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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 11:59 AM
unit 4
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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon
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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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The Most Epic Shantytowns You’ll Ever See

The Most Epic Shantytowns You’ll Ever See | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In 2009 photographer Noah Addis began working on a series titled “Future Cities” about squatter communities in densely populated cities around the world.
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Why San Francisco May Be the New Silicon Valley

Why San Francisco May Be the New Silicon Valley | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new analysis reveals that venture capital investment is flowing into cities at a startling clip.
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No, You’re Probably Not Smarter Than a 1912-Era 8th Grader

No, You’re Probably Not Smarter Than a 1912-Era 8th Grader | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How well can you do on this 101-year old quiz for Bullitt County, Kentucky, eighth graders?
Nancy Watson's insight:

They did have questions on geography. 

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Economic Geography Rick Gindele NCGE 2013

Rick Gindele's Economy Geography presentation at NCGE 2013 for the APHG strand
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Political and Economic Geography Presentations

Political and Economic Geography Presentations | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand. Seth Dixon's insight: The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a ...
Nancy Watson's insight:

These are "experts" in APHG. Great resources. 

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What the New SAT and Digital ACT Might Look Like

What the New SAT and Digital ACT Might Look Like | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The SAT is being overhauled — again — and the ACT is going digital. The test makers reveal what the exams might look like.
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Migration of female domestic workers :: Financial Express :: Financial Newspaper of Bangladesh

Migration of female domestic workers :: Financial Express :: Financial Newspaper of Bangladesh | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A Complete newspaper with financial Bias. Online daily Financial newspaper from Bangladesh. Developed by orangebd Ltd

Via Natalie K Jensen
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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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The Wake-Up Call in China's 'Visit Your Parents' Law

The Wake-Up Call in China's 'Visit Your Parents' Law | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
My father is 67-years-old, and lives in the sprawling outskirts of Guangzhou. I last saw him a year ago.
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A Village Invents a Language All Its Own

A Village Invents a Language All Its Own | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A linguist has concluded that a new language, with unique grammatical rules, has come into existence, created by children in a remote area of Australia.
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Geography of Coffee

Geography of Coffee | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Every morning, millions of people around the world enjoy a cup of coffee to get a jump start on their day. Learn about the geography of coffee, from Geography at About.com
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European History Interactive Map

European History Interactive Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, August 10, 2013 7:51 PM

So many uses!

Lola Jennings- Edquist's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:56 AM

What an awesome map! A great resource for teaching kids history- and making it simple to understand, as well as interactive. Can be used in conjunction with the 'Protest Sites' map I scooped above; in a unit on protests and change around the world. 

 

I think it links to most areas of Humanities, which is cool. I showed it to some of the kids from placement and they loved it! 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:28 PM

Great Quick tool to use and very informative.

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The weirdest languages

The weirdest languages | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Which natural languages are weirder? (1) German, Spanish, and Mandarin, or (2) Indonesian, Turkish, and Hungarian? Surprise!
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Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village

Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Mom Wants You Married? So Does the State

Mom Wants You Married? So Does the State | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In South Korea, the government is playing a bigger role in matchmaking amid plunging birthrates and changing expectations over matrimony.
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Population Density

Population Density | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Cultural Geography
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Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls

Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burqa-clad superhero.

Via Seth Dixon
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Luisa Pinto's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:32 AM

Globalização não quer dizer que vamos todos ficar iguais. Nem podia. 

Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:58 PM

"the Burka Avenger" is a new cartoon aired in pakistan aiming to empower pakistani women who wear burkas.

I think this clip is a great resourse for not only empowering pakistani women and girls but to use within the Australian classroom in order to not only expose students to different cultures entertainment but more specifically look at rasism, stereotyoes and different cultures traditons in a fun and enagaging way

Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:15 AM

What do you think of this? Do you think it will have an impact on how women perceive themselves?

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Japan social security reform proposal seeks to double contributions from seniors

Japan social security reform proposal seeks to double contributions from seniors | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A government panel released a social security system reform proposal Friday calling for greater contributions from the elderly and high-income earners as well as other reforms to make the system ...
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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The End of the Suburbs | TIME.com

The End of the Suburbs | TIME.com | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The country is resettling along more urbanized lines, and the American Dream is moving with it
Nancy Watson's insight:

Times change and so do urban patterns.

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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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Stranded by Sprawl

Stranded by Sprawl | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Are spread-out cities killing the American dream?
Nancy Watson's insight:

Does Urban structure affect social mobility? Are southern cities more at risk of a widening social gap due to urban sprawl?

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Solving Japan's age-old problem

Solving Japan's age-old problem | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Soon there will be three pensioners for every child under 15. Now, Patrick Collinson reports, the Land of the Rising Sun is going back to the future …
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