Mrs. Watson's Class
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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.
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125 years of the Berlin Conference

125 years of the Berlin Conference | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
THE BERLIN CONFERENCEThere is no single event in modern African history whose consequences have been as dire for the continent as the Berlin Conference of 1884-85, reports New African.
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human migration

human migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This collection contains a selection of content from NG Education about human migration. Use search to find more.
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:57 PM

We will be discussing this soon HUGGERS

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy — This Chart Shows How

10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy — This Chart Shows How | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Ten mega corporations control the output of almost everything you buy; from household products to batteries. But it gets even crazier who when you see who controls the money.
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Regional slang words | Geography Education

Regional slang words | Geography Education | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use? This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.
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Fun Tour of American Accents | Amy Walker

A Fun tour of American Accents. How To Do an American Accent - Bonus! You Did It! Well done. :-) Bonus from a FUN, in-depth, private tutorial series with acc...
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Great look at American Accents by region

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Marianne Riddile's curator insight, February 14, 2014 7:46 AM

Motorhomers not only travel to a variety of locations around the country but they get to meet a wide variety of people from various locales. You will recognize these various accents and it might be fun to locate the tutorials she mentions on YouTube.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:01 PM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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Create Your Visited States and Provinces Map

Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States.
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Geography Awareness Week

Geography Awareness Week | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Launched in 1987 by presidential proclamation, Geography Awareness Week is an annual opportunity for families and schools to engage in fun, educational experiences that draw attention to the importance of geographic understanding.
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3 Simple Ways to Realize You Do Know about Geography

3 Simple Ways to Realize You Do Know about Geography | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
If you are a human being who has been to school sometime between 1960 and 1990, and if you have never been following a college or university course in the field of geography, then you probably thin...
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Africa’s first fair-trade clothing company is a huge deal

Africa’s first fair-trade clothing company is a huge deal | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Liberty and Justice pays its garment workers a living wage and gives them a stake in the company -- and the results are amazing.
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Bolivian Skull Ceremony Blends Ancient Rite With Catholicism

Bolivian Skull Ceremony Blends Ancient Rite With Catholicism | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The skulls are blessed at chapel each year and revered as objects of devotion.
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

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Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration

Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
An interactive picture of Americans perpetually on the move.
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Can you speak Esperanto? - CNN.com Video

CNN's Monita Rajpal takes a look at the origins Esperanto and some of the world's most famous Esperantists.
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21 Accents

Here's a little tour of 21 accents in one take. Love the fun challenge of switching between them fluidly. Props to All of these places and their multi-accent...
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Accents from many countries/cities. She is good.

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Parallel worlds

Parallel worlds | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
ON A RESTLESS night in April 1970, Lee Jae-geun, one of 27 South Korean fishermen aboard a trawler in the Yellow Sea, awoke from a nightmare. He had dreamt that...
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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


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