Mrs. Watson's Class
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Useful Geographies - What Geographers Can Bring to the Table

Useful Geographies - What Geographers Can Bring to the Table | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
While some geographers find it hard to demonstrate the incredible potentials of their field to the public (in one hand), there is a growing curiosity from a very wide (non specialized) audience for...
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Nature and perspectives. Why we need Geography

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▶ Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders


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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Germany in figures

Germany in figures | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Germany is Europe's dominant country.  Its large and strong economy has allowed it to bankroll the bailouts that have kept some of its neighbours - and the euro - afloat.  The graphics below help explain why it is so dominant, and powerful - and also some of the problems it faces."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 2014 5:34 PM

This comparison between employment rate and household income is important to Germany in many ways. As Germany is Europe's primarily dominant country, Germany needs to keep unemployment rates down while keeping household income up.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Germany has proven continuously throughout the years that it is a thriving strong country.  With a booming economy they are able to have a large export economy.  Also with the booming economy and growing jobs people are immigrating from their home countries into Germany in search of jobs, bringing with them their own ideas as well.  Unfortunately even after the reunification of east and west Germany you can still see the divide when it comes to unemployment and income.  In the old east Germany area people have a higher unemployment rate and lower household income than they do in the old west Germany.  If these two areas can become unified on this front than Germany could have an even strong stand as a power in Europe.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 2:03 PM

Germany may be Europe's economic powerhouse, but this article shows that it is not without it's own problems. The effects of a divided Germany can still be seen in the country's economy, with east Germany experiencing noticeably higher unemployment rates and lower income rates than west Germany. Unemployment rates are lower than in the rest of Europe, but wages have not increased evenly and many still rely on benefits to supplement their income. 

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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.

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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:55 PM

Showing the distribution of Islam around the world. Outside of the middle east, Indonesia has the most Muslims. This religion is one of the fastest growing in the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:46 PM

This article was good to look at because the majority of people assume Muslims are only in the Middle East. There are 1.6 billion Muslims around the world. Two-thirds of the Muslim population live in the Asia-Pacific region than in the middle east. More Muslims actually live in India and Pakistan. Muslims make up the majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. Islam has become the world's second largest religious tradition after Christianity. I would love to know some reasons behind why certain Muslims live in other areas. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:33 PM

This interesting map/infographic shows where Muslims are concentrated around the world. What I found most interesting and a little bit counterintuitive was that the highest number of Muslims is found in the Asia- Pacific region rather than in Northern Africa or the Middle East. When you consider how large Indonesia's population is, however, and the fact that more than three-quarters of it identify as Muslim, it makes a bit more sense. What is really staggering is the fact that there are an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making nearly a quarter of the global population Muslim. 

 

What this map shows is the ability of religion to transcend political, economic, and cultural borders. Though Islam is a religion with its origins in the Middle East, it has grown and spread across the world to now have adherents on every continent. Of course, Islam is not the only major religion to have accomplished this feat, but it is particularly important to keep in mind considering the fear and criticism with which Islam has been met in recent years. People tend to think of Muslims as uniformly extremist advocates of violence who wage holy wars no matter the cost. This is, of course, untrue and characterizes the kind of dangerous stereotyping that occurs in regards to many different religions. While this map seeks to show numbers and percentages, it also shows that there are many, many more Muslims in the world than the extremists highlighted in the news and that Islam is not defined by these radicals. 

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Teaching Kids about Global Poverty

Teaching Kids about Global Poverty | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Living on One Dollar is a full-length documentary made by four college students who traveled to rural Guatemala to live on just a dollar a day. Upon their return, they created Living On One, a nonprofit to raise awareness and inspire action around global issues like hunger and poverty -- and started by publishing the Change Series of video shorts. I found it so compelling I've dedicated this whole film fest to it. Each episode not only succinctly frames an issue faced by people in the developing world and makes it personal, but also offers resource links to learn more -- and even better -- to do something about it."


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Character Minutes's curator insight, March 13, 2014 1:24 PM

Several character traits could be empasized using theses videos. The wheels in my mind are turning!

 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Fundraiser event taught by kids

lyn chatfield's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:49 PM

The links

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:54 AM

The United States is home to a number of different so called Mega Regions. We live in the Boston to Washington corridor which is commonly known as the megalopolis. The statistics  from this region are just astounding to behold.  18 percent of the nations population lives in this corridor. That percent is roughly 56.5 million people. The total economic output of the region is an astounding 3.75 trillion. If it were a country, it would be the fourth largest economy in the world.  

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:06 PM
unit 7
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What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders?

What Are The Rules For Changing A Country's Borders? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Drawing borders feels like an anachronism that was the domain of 19th-century diplomats, but Crimea shows that national boundaries still aren't considered fixed in many parts of the world.
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Great for political unit or review. Nation, states, borders. 

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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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This is very revealing

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Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:32 AM

This StoryMap from ESRI is a nice way to explore the current events in Crimea and this set of maps from National Geographic shows the historical geography of the region.   This issue has many inter-regional connections as well.  Many residents of former Soviet Republics are nervous seeing Russia's aggressive political strategy;  Moscow's previously similar foreign policy that aligned with Beijing's interests are now diverging

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Our future in cities

Our future in cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.
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Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

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ethnicity.ac.uk - Facts and figures about ethnic difference and inequality in the UK

ethnicity.ac.uk - Facts and figures about ethnic difference and inequality in the UK | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:25 PM

Unit III - Non American

The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, April 8, 2014 10:03 AM

Ever noticed how similar people are grouped together? Even in culturally rich melting pots like Miami, for example. Though there is a plethora of cultures there, most are organized by culture, explaining ethnic neighborhoods. No matter how diverse an area is, people still tend to stick close to those who are culturally similar to them. So while there may be culturally rich cities, they always end up dividing themselves. It's inevitable. -Brooke 

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Does Chopping Down Forests Spread Diseases?

A young scientist in Panama devises a novel way to study ticks and disease
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 19, 2014 3:02 PM

Interesting study related to medicine and diffusion 

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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


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SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:54 PM

Unit 1

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:15 PM

course resource

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Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...

 

And yes, English has its deepest roots in German...the French aspects were tacked on after the Norman Conquest.


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ethanrobert's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:20 AM

This is a wonderful map that truly shows language families and their roots. In Europe, I was rather surprised when I seen that the Romance branch was much larger than that of the Germanic. All of the ancient Germanic groups such as the Jutes, Angols, and the Saxons were well versed in combat. Considering they conquered much of Western Europe, how is it that the Romance group is bigger than the Germanic? Also, in Eastern Europe, the Albanian language has no reason to exist. In a region dominated by the Slavic group with no environmental barriers, the Albanian language should not exist.~Ethan.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:33 PM

Unit II

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 2014 8:43 PM

This isn't my normal area of interest but I found this fascinating!

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Gambia president rejects English language

Gambia president rejects English language | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
President's decision to shift official language from English to local language comes months after its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:25 PM

Gambia does not want the English language to be the official language that is spoken anymore.  Noting that it reflects the UK and they don't believe that they and the UK have much in common especially on the platform of human rights.  Cutting the English language as the official language continues to cut ties with the UK.  One of the problems with this is if there are multiple local languages spoken in Gambia which one are they going to choose as the official language.  With this more problems are presented, those that do not know the local language that is chosen to be official will have to learn the new language quickly if they want to have any idea as to what is going on in their own country.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:32 PM

The president’s reaction is more than understandable. His country is in the midst of trying to heal after de-colonization. His actions show he is trying to cut out the west altogether. It is an extreme move, but if done correctly it could give the country a chance to start over to develop their own culture again. I think having a more local language could have the potential to unite the country. However, given the many dialects spoken in a typical African country, I do wonder what language will actually be chosen. If anything, there might have to be a few official languages so as to keep the peace among the population. Furthermore, English will still need to be learned. As much as Gambia may resent the United States or the UK those countries are too dominant. As such, the nation will have to do business with them or one of the many other countries that speak English. When this happens, English will be the expected language and not an African dialect because Africa doesn’t have the power to really negotiate its terms. Therefore, I think all this will end up being is a symbolic stand as the world is far to interconnected for Gambia to truly cut off ties with the western world permanently.  

 

I can also see where the president is coming from in regards to the human right’s issues as well. I am in no way condoning the countries handling of domestic affairs. I think a firing squad is outdated to say the least. However, being talked down to by a country who egregiously violated the population without ever really making amends is insulting. Furthermore, being reliant on their money is probably insufferable. I would say the country might need the money, but given how aid is improperly implemented in most foreign countries I don’t even think cutting them off matters much. Still, one might think that after experiencing such social injustice the leader would be a little more compassionate to its people. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 8:46 PM
unit 3
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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 29, 2015 4:24 PM

The lingering effects of colonialism, so strongly relevant in every aspect of African ways of life, are perhaps most evident in the "lingua franca" of African nations today. With a multitude of different ethnicities and languages in use in every African nation today, the result of the arbitrarily drawn national borders made by European colonizers, necessitates the use of the one language that's commonly spoken across every independent nation- a European tongue. This system, while a necessity in today's world, is a solution that no one is quite happy with. It reminds Africans of all ages of the power still held by their colonizers over their everyday lives, a stark reminder of the horrors of the previous century at every business meeting and every exchange of goods. This harms the national psyche of each nation, as well as undermining the importance and pride Africans deservedly maintain in their own native languages. European-made borders, however, make it difficult to find another, native language that every ethnic group can agree upon. As a result, the European languages are still in use in Africa, and will most likely still be in use for some time to come. It's a system that no one likes but, for the time being, everyone must accept as reality.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:26 AM

This map is a great resource in showing the diversity of language in Africa. Of course, this map discounts the many native African languages. It instead focuses on the language of business in the continent. That language, has been influence by the European colonization of Africa. The chosen language of business is often tied to the colonizer of the region. The diversity of language in Africa is staggering to say the least.  

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The Surprising Lessons of the 'Muslim Hipsters' Backlash

The Surprising Lessons of the 'Muslim Hipsters' Backlash | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
I made a music video to share my own story as a Muslim woman in America. In doing so, I was expected to share every other Muslim woman's story, too.
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Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:18 AM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

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Notes from the Ironbound: Songs About the Suburbs

Notes from the Ironbound: Songs About the Suburbs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Urban /suburban music 

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Revealing the Gap Between Men and Women Farmers - National Geographic

Revealing the Gap Between Men and Women Farmers - National Geographic | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
On International Women's Day, addressing inequalities can feed millions
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Did You Know 3.0

The New 2012 HD version on the progression of information technology researched by Karl Fisch, and modified by me! Globalization & The Information Age.

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Did you Know? Shift Happens, and it is happening at an exponential rate. Half of this 2012 version maybe obsolete. Time, and technology, does not stand still.

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steve smith's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:30 AM

Great for beginning the development topic

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:19 AM

If you haven't seen this classic, don't wait one more minute! Creates a paradigm shift!

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:50 AM

It has been interesting to watch the "Did You Know" videos updated over the years. The first was profound for me as a teacher and I continued to use the updated versions for years.

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America’s Sinking Middle Class

America’s Sinking Middle Class | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The standard of living of most Americans has fallen in the last 25 years; last year, the typical household made $51,017, roughly the same as in 1988.  I have written several times before about how measures of social and economic well-being in the United States have slipped compared to other advanced countries. But it is even more poignant to recognize that, in many ways, America has been standing still for a full generation."


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:35 PM

and before we go blaming one ideology over another....  it is since 1988.  Yes it is something systemic.