Mrs. Watson's Class
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The Iraq-ISIS Conflict in Maps, Photos and Video

The Iraq-ISIS Conflict in Maps, Photos and Video | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A visual guide to the crisis in northern Iraq, updated daily.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great visuals 

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Princeton University study finds students more likely to learn by taking handwritten notes

Princeton University study finds students more likely to learn by taking handwritten notes | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Princeton University study indicates students learn better when taking handwritten notes in class instead of using computers.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Eye-hand-brain all interact when you hand write notes. Memorization is also being recognized again as good for the brain.

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NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:44 PM

With all the good we thought NAFTA did for the three countries involved, I feel that sometimes we overlook the bad.  Southern Mexico has felt all negative affects from NAFTA.  While the northern states in Mexico are able to keep up with the advanced agricultural processes that America has, the south is unable to.  The old techniques and lack of machinery prevents the south from having any possible competition with the north as well as America leaving the south to become extremely impoverished and potentially unsuitable for any living.

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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here-- video of an earlier version is here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 2014 9:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Solar Roadways


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Nancy Watson's insight:

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 8, 2014 12:12 AM

I'm sure a few of you have already seen this viral video and it should be intriguing to geographers for a variety of reasons (and not just because we love hexagons). Solar Roadways is a project in its infancy, but they have broad ambitions that would be revolutionary.  Roads that would produce energy?  The idea would have staggering results, but there are some practical reasons why this hasn't already been implemented.  A geographic perspective is critical as we plan for the future.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would the full implementation of this idea restructure the cultural landscape, urban environments and our cultural ecology?  What would some advantages be?  This video is a promotional video that emphasizes the positive; what drawbacks, limitations and obstacles are there to solar roadways in the future?  


Tags: transportation, technologyenergysustainability, planning, video.

Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Urged to Multiply, Iranian Couples Are Dubious

Urged to Multiply, Iranian Couples Are Dubious | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The country’s leadership is offering incentives to begin and enlarge families, but experts say little will change while economic prospects are grim.
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When Did Peking Become Beijing and Persia Become Iran? We Have the Data

When Did Peking Become Beijing and Persia Become Iran? We Have the Data | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Where politics and language collide: how place names change over time.
Nancy Watson's insight:

What is in a name?

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North Carolina: “Most gerrymandered state” | The Progressive Pulse

North Carolina: “Most gerrymandered state” | The Progressive Pulse | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
No surprise to people who live here, but North Carolina (in a tie with Maryland) was named the nation’s “most gerrymandered state” by the Washington Post’s Wonkblog today. As writer Christopher Ingraham puts it: North Carolina Republicans really outdid themselves in 2012. In addition to the 12th district, there’s the 4th, which covers Raleigh and Burlington and snakes ...
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This Map Shows How Fast Old People Are Taking Over the World

This Map Shows How Fast Old People Are Taking Over the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In a recent Simpsons episode, a Japanese tourist moves in with Comic Book Guy, infuriating her father, who exclaims: “Daughter, you are coming back to Japan; there are 87 old people who need you to take care of them!” Japan’s exceptionally old population—23 percent of it is 65 or older,...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Aging populations. What challenges will they present? What advantages might they create?

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AP Human Geography Models and Theories

In depth Prezi covering all AP Human Geography Models and Theories by Liam Page.....Simple Version- http://tinyurl.com/q637dl8
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great for reviewing the Models before the exam

 

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Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 2:08 PM

"Great for reviewing models before the exam" 

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Navigating the East China Sea

Navigating the East China Sea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
How to ease tensions between Beijing and Tokyo over an uninhabited string of islands.
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Islands equal territorial rights to the surrounding seas' fishing and natural resources 

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Latitudes not Attitudes: How Geography Explains History | History Today

Latitudes not Attitudes: How Geography Explains History | History Today | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

iro

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Environmental determinism or possiblism? The debate goes on, but who do we listen to?

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Global MPI | Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative (OPHI)

Global MPI | Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative (OPHI) | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Global Multidimensional Poverty Index GLOBAL MPI 2014 Visit the Global MPI 2014 pages to access a wealth of resources, including case studies, infographics
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great material for a lesson on poverty

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Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 2:05 PM

Poverty Lesson

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting look at who goes and who stays in selected cities. 

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Chinese school for disputed island

Chinese school for disputed island | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

China's actions are raising tensions in this area.

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Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 2:06 PM

Current news article on China

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2014 10:19 PM

One of the great results of the decennial census is that geographers, demographers, sociologists, urbanists and countless others, can track the same population or spatial pattern and note historical changes over a 10 year span.  This series of maps and charts highlights some of the major changes.  You shouldn't be surprised that Atlanta is the United States' most sprawling major city and that San Francisco is the most compact, but this article dives beneath surface in a way that is still very accessible.   


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhoodplanning, densityplanning

François Arnal's curator insight, June 7, 2014 2:18 AM

L'étalement urbain aux Etats Unis.

 

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

About 1/7 of the world population lives on $1 a day (or LESS)

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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Here are the 31 countries Google Maps won’t draw borders around

Here are the 31 countries Google Maps won’t draw borders around | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Google may be standing up to government surveillance, but on Google Maps it shies away from conflict. The company displays the borders of 31 states differently than the other 162 members of the United Nations. Many of these countries have long had disputed borders or are currently facing military conflicts. Google Maps is customized in many ways to better serve...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Boundary disputes are not just a thing of the past.

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ESRI Pledges $1B in Software and Stem Education: Video

ESRI Pledges $1B in Software and Stem Education: Video | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
ESRI CEO Jack Dangermond discusses strengthening and investing in stem education with Trish Regan on Bloomberg Television's “Street Smart”. (Source: Bloomberg)
Nancy Watson's insight:

What a wonderful way to learn about Geography available to every K-12 public school student.

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15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Context is everything.
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Sometimes it is what you can't see that is important

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South Korea boycott of Japanese goods over island dispute

South Korea boycott of Japanese goods over island dispute | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
South Korean shop owners are launching a nationwide boycott of Japanese products over a territorial dispute between the two countries.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Territorial dispute over the island of Dokdo/Takeshima in the East Sea/Sea of Japan

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Korea.net : The official website of the Republic of Korea

Korea.net : The official website of the Republic of Korea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The South Korean government provides news about Korea, Korean government policy, information on Korean history, Korean culture, traveling in South Korea, life in Korea, inter-Korean relations and more.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Korea disputes Japanese claims to the Islands of Dokdo off the east coast of Korea.

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10 Corporations Control Almost Everything You Buy

Information clearing house

Nancy Watson's insight:

Great example of vertical and horizontal integration. Some surprises here, although not all are actually owned by the indicated parent company, but do have connections

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