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Our future in cities

Our future in cities | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

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ethnicity.ac.uk - Facts and figures about ethnic difference and inequality in the UK

ethnicity.ac.uk - Facts and figures about ethnic difference and inequality in the UK | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:25 PM

Unit III - Non American

The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, April 8, 2014 10:03 AM

Ever noticed how similar people are grouped together? Even in culturally rich melting pots like Miami, for example. Though there is a plethora of cultures there, most are organized by culture, explaining ethnic neighborhoods. No matter how diverse an area is, people still tend to stick close to those who are culturally similar to them. So while there may be culturally rich cities, they always end up dividing themselves. It's inevitable. -Brooke 

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Does Chopping Down Forests Spread Diseases?

A young scientist in Panama devises a novel way to study ticks and disease
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 19, 2014 3:02 PM

Interesting study related to medicine and diffusion 

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Ukraine in Maps

Ukraine in Maps | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Russian armed forces effectively seized control of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula on Saturday.
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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 2, 2014 3:31 PM

LDCs are lean and hungry (tortoises) while the MDCs are fat and complacent (rabbits).

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Violence escalates in divided Venezuela

Violence escalates in divided Venezuela | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelan security forces and demonstrators faced off in streets blocked by burning barricades in several cities on Thursday in an escalation of protests against President Nicolas

Via Seth Dixon
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 1:36 PM

Violent government protesting is on the rise and its mostly led by students. The citizens of Venezuela are protesting the socialist government, led by president Nicolas Maduro. Since his election in April 2013 he has been blamed for violent crime, high inflation, product shortages and repression of opponents, like a dictatorship.  protesting has escalated causing Venezuelan security forces to create burning barricades in the streets. over the last week there has been 5 recorded deaths.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 28, 2015 11:15 AM

I remember first reading about the Venezuelan riots while taking a course in Latin American history, and it saddens me to see the violence taking place in Caracas and in other urban areas. However, the demonstrations continuing to be made by students in the face of violence from their government is incredibly inspiring. These educated young men and women are dying for the simple right to be governed fairly and responsibly within the framework of a larger democratic society; I say "simple" in the sense that this is something I take for granted everyday. However, the history of the world has shown that achieving this standard of living is anything but simple, and Venezuela's government crackdown is just the latest on a lengthy list of such conflicts between a government and its own people. My heart goes out to those rebelling against the current system, one where those in power cling to power in any means possible in order to continue the corruption that brings them so much wealth. What these students are fighting for is admirable, and I hope that the government hears their voices and realizes that it is fighting a lost cost. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:53 PM

if this was going on in the us there would be pretty constant gun battles in every street. it seems to me that if the people in this country are opposed to their government and the government is insistent that nothing be done then the country is going to go even more to hell then Venezuela already has.

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Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch

Monitoring the World's Forests with Global Forest Watch | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Global Forest Watch uses satellite imagery and other technologies to estimate forest usage, change, and tree cover (among other things). These estimates and their eventual actions used to be slow. Now they're near-real-time.


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Seoul, South Korea - current and accurate time

Seoul, South Korea - current and accurate time | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This fullscreen or popup-window displays a clock showing current time in any time zone in the world.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Looking forward to going to Korea. This gives the local time in Seoul. 

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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.
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Map the Meal Gap: Food Insecurity in your count...

Map the Meal Gap: Food Insecurity in your count... | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Visit Feeding America, the nation's leading domestic hunger-relief charity. Feeding America's helps provide food to over 37 millions Americans each year.

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As Protests Continue in Brazil, Hard Lessons for an Urbanizing World

As Protests Continue in Brazil, Hard Lessons for an Urbanizing World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This widespread movement has clear echoes in developing megacities everywhere.
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America's Leading Metros for Venture Capital

America's Leading Metros for Venture Capital | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Bay Area remains at the top, but several cities are starting to catch up.
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Coastal Cities And Climate Change: You're Going To Get Wet - Business Insider

Coastal Cities And Climate Change: You're Going To Get Wet - Business Insider | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Business Insider
Coastal Cities And Climate Change: You're Going To Get Wet
Business Insider
BEFORE Hurricane Sandy tore through New York and New Jersey, it stopped in Florida.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 17, 2013 8:05 PM

Florida may have some moving to do.

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Did You Know 3.0

The New 2012 HD version on the progression of information technology researched by Karl Fisch, and modified by me! Globalization & The Information Age.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Did you Know? Shift Happens, and it is happening at an exponential rate. Half of this 2012 version maybe obsolete. Time, and technology, does not stand still.

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steve smith's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:30 AM

Great for beginning the development topic

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:19 AM

If you haven't seen this classic, don't wait one more minute! Creates a paradigm shift!

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:50 AM

It has been interesting to watch the "Did You Know" videos updated over the years. The first was profound for me as a teacher and I continued to use the updated versions for years.

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America’s Sinking Middle Class

America’s Sinking Middle Class | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The standard of living of most Americans has fallen in the last 25 years; last year, the typical household made $51,017, roughly the same as in 1988.  I have written several times before about how measures of social and economic well-being in the United States have slipped compared to other advanced countries. But it is even more poignant to recognize that, in many ways, America has been standing still for a full generation."


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:35 PM

and before we go blaming one ideology over another....  it is since 1988.  Yes it is something systemic.

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▶ MALTHUS AND POPULATION : TEN MINUTE GUIDE - YouTube

A ten minute guide to the 18th/19th century English classical economist Malthus and his theory of population. Produced for the history and context of journal...
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Ukraine Mobilizes Reserve Troops, Threatening War

Ukraine Mobilizes Reserve Troops, Threatening War | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Russia’s move to seize control of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula on Saturday led Ukraine to call up its military reserves on Sunday and warn Moscow against further incursions.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 2, 2014 3:35 PM

Ethnic tensions and threats of war in Russia. Return to the Cold War?

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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.


NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.

NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.

NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies.  Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.

North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.

In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.


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Gary Yarus's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:24 AM

A good review for those concerned about the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 7:42 PM

It is interesting to see exactly what NAFTA has done for North America.  Making trade easier and free between the three countries helps all the economies included.  Free trade between each other means less costly goods.  Also resources can be used from different countries and manufactured in steps not all in one place.  All of the negative comments about it being a one sided deal between the United States and Mexico can be argued with numbers about how it is in fact not a one sided agreement and both countries are benefiting from NAFTA being put in place.

David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 2015 3:55 PM

I found this to be an extremely interesting article. I'd say I have a basic comprehension of economics, so I am trying to expand my horizons and learn more about the topic. This article was clear, well-written/structured, and was a good read for someone not so experienced in Economics. 

I find the NAFTA agreement to be quite useful. The article did a good job at portraying many of the pros the agreement puts forth. It is clear that the three nations involved benefit. Throughout the article I was wondering if the agreement had been modified to accommodate todays new technology, trade goods, etc... The article then went and discussed this topic.The article did so through stating the importance in NAFTA branching out in other trade agreements, with nations in the Pacific as well as Nations in the EU. What's neat about this is how whether Mexico or Canada making the trade... all nations involved in the NAFTA agreement benefit. 

What I want to know however is where do these jobs, that this agreement creates are set geographically? I can only assume they are predominately in the South West (in regards to Mexico) and in the North/mid North West (in regards to Canada). Who are the people working these jobs? It seems like they'd be the immigrants themselves, not so much existing citizens. Does this create a problem amongst the masses? 

It seems as if NAFTA could benefit from expanding its trade market. This is something I am interested in reading more about and perhaps keeping up to date with. Side note... in regards to USA being able to buy capital in the countries "cross-border investment," and vis versa, I find it extremely useful and creative. 

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:14 PM

This is so big!  I suppose we could always use these container ships as fall back housing by country should the earth get swallowed up by the ocean.  Would it be faster to have smaller ships that can cruise at a faster speed versus a larger ship that holds more?  How many places can these container ships actually fit?  Where will the outmoded ship eventually go? 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:53 PM

Although these massive container ships can carry more cargo, they are  also creating a recipe for a major economic disaster.  Larger ships dont do as well in the water and have greater potential for hull damage.  Any ship that loses cargo is going to cost a lot of money, but if one these larger ships go down, your talking about tens of millions of dollars of lost goods.  And thats only the cost in goods lost, not to mention the ecological cost of having oil and ship parts in the water and the cost to have it all removed.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 4:53 PM

Form the perspective of the Nicaraguan Government, this project is a chance to get ahead economically regardless of the consequences to the environment and its population. As the article mentions, this is the second poorest country in the region, but the project could triple the economy's growth and strengthen employment. As a government leader who wants to be a more powerful country, a few causalities on the quest to economic prowess is nothing.  Especially because the government doesn't really have any other alternative ways to expand the economy that quickly with so much potential success. 

 

I think this project is part of a common trend seen throughout this class. When I read this it reminded me of the workers safety video in which Chinese companies let their employees jump on a crane without safety gear in order to cheaply complete a project.  Or how China allows their factories to run despite the mass pollution the industry is causing. It isn't like China is the only country to ever cut corners either. Before the US and Europe become switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, these countries employment laws and environmental laws were horrible (some could argue they still are actually). One of the scientist in this article, Myers, even touched on this point by saying he "there’s a touch of hypocrisy in outsiders from industrialized countries preaching environmental purity." Hypocritical or not, I really wish countries would learn the harm that came from the actions past industrial societies took to get ahead. Although, given the government's stance on this project, I really don't think that was the lesson learned. 

 

As a citizen of Nicaragua this is incredibly worrisome.  Their is the potential that the ecosystem is disturbed, which would have  many unpredictable consequences. Furthermore, the drinking supply could be destroyed. Since this area is already poor, the families of this area would have a hard time just up and leaving their homes. So for the sake of the citizens, I really hope that if the project moves forward there won't be many adverse complications. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:39 PM

I remember reading that this was the original location for where the canal to connect the Pacific and Atlantic was going to be, but the technology available at the time made it impossible for the plan to be set into motion. It would be interesting to see if it can be done, as there is a variety of environmental factors at play that would make its construction complicated. I bet the venture would be very profitable for the nation's government, but I doubt that much of this work would end up helping the Nicaraguan people, and it would irreversibly alter the geographic landscape of the surrounding area. I would also be interested to see how the US would react to its construction. China is our biggest economic competitor and not an explicit ally of our's, so I wonder how comfortable the government would be with a Chinese firm exerting so much influence over a region that is very much in our own backyard. Its construction would have a number of political, economic, social, and cultural consequences, not only for Nicaragua, but for Central America and the US as well.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

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The Koreas at Night : Image of the Day

The Koreas at Night : Image of the Day | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Night lights illustrate dramatically the relative economic activity of cities and countries.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Amazing evidence of development. 

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See the Greatest Architecture in 36 Different European Cities in This One, Gorgeous Time-Lapse

See the Greatest Architecture in 36 Different European Cities in This One, Gorgeous Time-Lapse | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Dozens of pieces of premiere European architecture are showcased in this three-and-a-half minute video
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 10, 2013 6:06 PM

Great view of cultural landscapes

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Why San Francisco May Be the New Silicon Valley

Why San Francisco May Be the New Silicon Valley | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new analysis reveals that venture capital investment is flowing into cities at a startling clip.

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In Singapore, Making Cars Unaffordable Has Only Made Them More Desirable

In Singapore, Making Cars Unaffordable Has Only Made Them More Desirable | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A paltry 15 percent of the city-state's population owns their own vehicle, but not by choice.
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6 More U.S. Counties Are Now Majority-Minority

6 More U.S. Counties Are Now Majority-Minority | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Welcome to your demographic future, Charlotte, North Carolina.
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