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Eating together and expanding the table

Eating together and expanding the table | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Changing the way we eat, by consuming and wasting less, can help to resolve global hunger.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Good for ag unit

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FRONTLINE/WORLD . Guatemala/Mexico - Coffee Country . Index page | PBS

FRONTLINE/WORLD . Guatemala/Mexico - Coffee Country . Index page | PBS | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In the highlands of Guatemala and southern Mexico, verdant coffee fields were once the agricultural mainstay for millions of people.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Coffee production and Fair Trade

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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:29 AM

Seeing the damage done to all of these homes and communities is devastating. You see all the destruction in different areas on TV, but looking at it from a maps perspective is so much different. Seeing how it was and then looking at it after is unreal. The damage that is done to so much land is saddening. Then to look at the map of all the tornadoes since 1950 was eye opening. I never realized that there was so many tornadoes that occurred throughout the U.S since 1950. It was also shocking to see that there had been a huge tornado in the Boston area that took peoples lives. Usually when I think about tornadoes I don't think about them in Boston, Connecticut, or New York. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 6:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:37 PM

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 7:40 AM

Just seems to be a pattern with any mega city.  People move to the city for a better life.  Even though there is overcrowding and lack of infrastructure in these growing cities they feel it is a better life than the rural areas.  They still need the infrastructure from the government but this group has been training the people there to go and make the changes for themselves oh what they can control.  They are giving them the skills they need to make changes.  They now need to use those skills to get the government to make the necessary infrastructure changes that the government knows are needed.  They know the people are flooding to the cities and they see the promblem, but nothing wil be done until the people demand the changes that are necessary.  It can happen, might take time but it can happen..just ask the Romanov family of Russia..oh wait..they are not there...

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 5:10 PM

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea — a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago — mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

Via Seth Dixon
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Padmanabhan Jaikumar's comment, June 4, 2013 9:57 PM
may be answers to many questions
Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 11, 2013 11:37 PM
Tnanks! This map makes it easier to understand our world right now.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:27 PM

My favorite part about this map has to be its unintentionaly demographich connecter (If that even makes sense) for example along the south east part of the united states their are alot of latin americans and on this map the two continents are brought closer to each other to match the cultural demogaphic. To continue this the east coast and dixie are have a massive african american population. and again the african continent is brought close to people who have ancestreal roots to it. I know that pangea is not the reason why each culture settled in its respetive area just funny how well that worked out.

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Geography of Aspiration

Geography of Aspiration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Try to replicate it with development schemes all you want, but you're overlooking what makes New York City—and other places of ambition—so great.

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Dean Haakenson's comment, June 6, 2013 8:30 AM
Very cool.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:31 PM

I think that historical opportunity is what makes NYC so great... well, great as implied by the writers of this article.  Having a good history, it is only natural that it would become something so popular and draw the ambitious to it.  In contrast, a newly formed colony of humans on Mars would be potentially better- because in this hypothetical/planned colony, people would be able to benefit from the fact that they are building from the ground up, from scratch, and with the knowledge of other development schemes/trends that occurred elsewhere.  This could entirely circumvent all ill aspects of society... Sometimes to create, one must first destroy... perhaps NYC should be rebuilt to eliminate problems, before humans move on to other worlds?  I thought NY was a bit of a mess when I drove through with my cousin.  The graffiti was gorgeous, but the filth and traffic were quite triumphant, and it is not a place where my ambition would lead me.  I think true talent will be found, regardless of this subliminal advertisment brought about by the article endorsing NYC as a 'place of ambition.'  Not all of us can go to these 'meccas' of talent... but it doesn't mean we are any less extravagent as life forms.  I would ask if most people would want to make it big in places like that, or if they would rather be happier, elsewhere.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:53 AM

This reminds me of the production method idea you taught us where even though you may be able to produce 2 products better than a third world country it is for the best if you have them do what they excel at while you do your thing. (You made a lebron james reference in class). the reason why im connecting this is because every city has its own thing to offer with San fran being the arts portland with the mom and pop shops and new york with the enterainment. if you can excel at what you do then your city can blossom.

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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 7:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 6:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Communication and social media. 

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Tysa Fennern's curator insight, June 2, 2013 2:07 PM

Birds of a Feather...tweet together.

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 6:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 10:35 AM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

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Baby Name Regions?

Baby Name Regions? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Social Security Administration this week released its list of 2012’s most popular baby names by state, and maybe explained why there are so many Jacobs and Sophias in your kids’ schools. Do you see your kids’ names here?"


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The Best and Worst States for Eating Locally

The Best and Worst States for Eating Locally | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Vermont takes the top spot in the 2013 Locavore Index.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Hmmm Fl is a truck farming state for fruits and veggies and comes in the bottom 5?

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APHG Review Guides

APHG Review Guides | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 2013 10:16 AM

It's that time of year to really buckle down; several teachers have created PDFs versions of review guides for the May 17th AP Human Geography test.  James Nelsen, a veteran APHG teacher has produced a “grand review.”  This resource intentionally does not come with a key to force the students to delve deeper and search for the answers themselves.  Allison Hunt had her students create their own study guide for the APHG test focusing on the ‘big ideas.’  Best of luck and these and other resources are archived on my "thematic" tab on http://geographyeducation.org.

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Hispanics, the New Italians

Hispanics, the New Italians | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
We already know a great deal about how Latinos are faring with the challenge of assimilation: they are meeting it.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Immigration is not new to the USA. There have been objections and fears to every new group, but each have assimilated and made our nation stronger. Check your history.

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The Most Important Population Statistic That Hardly Ever Gets Talked About

The Most Important Population Statistic That Hardly Ever Gets Talked About | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Do you know your city's "commuter-adjusted population"?
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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 2:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:16 AM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:41 AM

This is fascinating to me

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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2013 4:48 AM

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's comment, May 24, 2013 8:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws

The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The complete global map of laws governing abortion and birth control.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 3, 2013 5:11 PM

This series of maps shows the cultural and legal differences around the world that impact access to abortion and birth control.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 2:18 PM

Another example of how the United States allows their citizens freedom to make a choice. Americans are allowed to choose contraception types, take birth control and get an abortion if they want to. Some countries only allow abortions if a child is conceived by rape. And then there are countries like El Salvador where an abortion is illegal and no one is permitted to get one under any circumstance. It is interesting to see all the different countries and their legal beliefs on these matters, and how it varies from state to state in the U.S. It gives the reader a little insight into the cultual and legal beliefs of the countries shown. 

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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2013 3:04 PM

These statistics only include documented migrants although the number of undocumented migration (mostly from Latin America and the Caribbean) has declined since 2007. 


Tagsmigration.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:57 AM

add your insight...

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 7:50 AM
Excellent
Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:05 PM

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 1:29 PM

These 22 maps are a great representation of how linguistically different the United States truly is. Depending  where you are from I the US shows how you say something differently. For example, in the Northeast and South, people pronounce the word caramel in two words, "cara and mel" and in the west and west coast it is pronounced " car-mel". Even the word crayon is pronounced differently depending where you live. 

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 20, 9:54 AM

This article is about a Bolivian culture which values its traditional food production methods. The Bolivians have even created some legislation to preserve their food sovereignty. Interestingly they do consume foreign foods, like hamburgers, but prefer them to be made by local street vendors. They have even managed to stave off most fast food restaurants, but they do have a dependence upon wheat imported from the United States.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

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Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 2013 10:00 AM

Essay #3 for the AP Human Geography 2013 exam focused on how railroads and highways impacted the size and form of U.S. cities.  Andy Baker, one of the great readers on that question has put together an interactive map filled with tangible examples of how Indianapolis' land use history has been heavily influenced by the railroads and highways.  This would be a great resource to prepare students to answer that FRQ. 


Tags: transportationurban, models, APHG.

Ally Greer's comment, June 11, 2013 10:58 AM
This brings back memories from when I took this in high school!
Andy Baker's comment, June 17, 2013 1:03 PM
Thanks for "scooping" this. When I click the link, it takes me to the Google home page. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=215141888958669508744.0004bb9c881395bd56662&msa=0&ll=39.772659,-85.940552&spn=1.06603,2.364807
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings. (#GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! C'est génial ce jeu !
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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."

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Reports (1990-2013) | Global Reports | HDR 2013 | Human Development Reports (HDR) | United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Reports (1990-2013) | Global Reports | HDR 2013 | Human Development Reports (HDR) | United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The UNHDR "Rise of the South" shows that China's economy has surpassed Japan for the number two spot, Brazil is making progress on raising the standard of living and fighting poverty, and new South states are making economic progress with global trade.

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Czech Republic's Ambassador

Czech Republic's Ambassador | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"As many I was deeply shocked by the tragedy that occurred in Boston earlier this month...As more information on the origin of the alleged perpetrators is coming to light, I am concerned to note in the social media a most unfortunate misunderstanding in this respect.  The Czech Republic and Chechnya are two very different entities - the Czech Republic is a Central European country; Chechnya is a part of the Russian Federation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 2013 6:59 PM

The fact that this official statement was even made by the Ambassador of the Czech Republic is an indictment on the state of geo-literacy in the United States.   The Chechen President also made a statement, saying to "look for the root of evil in America."

Tony Hall's curator insight, April 21, 2013 5:17 AM

This is the reason that geography is important.