Mrs. Watson's Class
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▶ Diffusion- expansion, hierarchical, contagious, stimulus - YouTube

Multimedia project for IPT286, teaching about diffusion
Nancy Watson's insight:

Explanation for Expansion diffusion with hierachical, contagious, stimulus examples.

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Lack of toilets blights the lives of 2.5bn people, UN chief warns

Lack of toilets blights the lives of 2.5bn people, UN chief warns | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
UN deputy secretary general says failure to address sanitation and open defecation threatens disaster for third of humanity
Nancy Watson's insight:

More people have cell phones than adequate toilets 

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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:57 AM

Click here to see a higher resolution version of this map (don't dismiss it as just a cartoon!).  


Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great resource for the religion unit.

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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo

The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With
modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at
the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris
Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of
multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the
world's major settlements, thread by thread.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Trade routes and methods change over time, but create many of the same effects - cultural exchange.

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Environmental ecology. What do we need to know about conserving the Arctic?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Looks like fun. Try it out and let me know

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Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Islamic State's capture of the Mosul dam gives it control over the water and electricity supply in northern Iraq."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Geography plays an important part in the success or failure of a state. This gives the insurgents an advantage.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 2014 10:00 PM

This is interesting, ISIS is not only using brute force as a scare tactic, but are also taking hold of natural resources as well.  In taking over the dam ISIS has control of not only a majority of Iraq's water supply but their power supply as well.  They are also threatening employees with loss of pay to do what they want.  Closing off some parts of the dam is preventing water to get to people who are in need.  If the dam was to get backed up too much it could have immediate failure creating a devastating flood wiping out areas of agriculture having the potential for mass civilian casualties.  ISIS is not just taking over everything that they can, but have a method to what they are doing.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 8:14 PM

As the director of the Brookings Institution's Doha Centre in Qatar said, "There's a method in their madness. By gaining control of the area ISIS can flood and destroy homes within the region. Furthermore, they can disrupt the flow of electricity and how the land is irrigated. All of this could cause a great deal of damage to the society. In this light the dam is a pretty important part of Iraq. The fact that ISIS Manipulated he land to their benefit it highly intelligent.  


However, if the dam was in the hand of the United States, the area still isn't completely safe. people would perceive it to be because ISIS would no longer be threatening to use it as an immediate weapon. However, the author noticed that the dam needs constant maintenance and is built on unstable soil. Both of which can cause flooding. In fact, the "worst case scenario" would cause far more damage than ISIS has with the dam. 


Clearly, purposefully using the resources of an area to damage a population is more chilling the a poorly made structure because malice involved. However even in the hands of the United States, the dam shows just how dangerous manipulating nature can be on a local population. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:21 PM

This will have an enormous impact on drought for drinking, agriculture purposes or even the opposite.  This strategy could be used to flood the lands ruining agriculture.

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10 Great Agriculture Infographics

10 Great Agriculture Infographics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A collection of 10 interesting and informative agriculture infographics from around the Internet.
Nancy Watson's insight:

The story of your food is not a simple thing. There are lots of steps in the commodity chain that take a piece of every dollar. Subsidies and allotments keep prices up or down depending.

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Sometimes we can predict the effects of our decisions, sometimes there are unintended consequences

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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41 - YouTube

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Globalization 

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:01 PM

Unit 1 Globalization

(Key term)

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Move Over Football Season: It’s Time for Fantasy Geopolitics

Move Over Football Season: It’s Time for Fantasy Geopolitics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
I was up late one night planning around these problems and decided to check my fantasy football team. An hour or so into researching, I realized I was learning. I wondered if I could recreate this experience — getting curious, becoming more aware, and using that awareness to compete better in fantasy football — in…
Nancy Watson's insight:

Worth a look for student engagement. 

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How Cultures Move Across Continents

How Cultures Move Across Continents | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Researchers have mapped the travels of 150,000 artists, politicians and religious leaders over the past 2,000 years. The videos reveal how cultural achievements ebb and flow across the U.S and Europe.
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Interactive map of migration of the west

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Why South Korea predicts its end will come in 2750

Why South Korea predicts its end will come in 2750 | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new report says the affects could be seen within generations.
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Population changes in the developed world are more and more becoming a problem of too few babies, while in the developing world the numbers are still high but beginning to decline

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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Whether global warming or just one of the heat and cooling cycles, this drought is extensive and making an impact on food prices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2014 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

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Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises

Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

In a move that has been widely seen as retaliatory, the Russian government has kicked off a series of random checks at McDonald's around the country, and has already shut down four prime locations in Moscow.


Via Allison Anthony, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

This was at one time the largest McDonalds.

 

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, August 23, 2014 8:51 AM
Putin using the Big Mac attack strategy.
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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


Via Seth Dixon
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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 2014 11:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2014 6:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

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Once You Look At These 7 Satellite Photos, You Will Discover A Very Uncomfortable Truth

Once You Look At These 7 Satellite Photos, You Will Discover A Very Uncomfortable Truth | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Today we have the ability to see change over time. Now can we figure out what to do about it?

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Book Discussion on [The World Is Flat]

Book Discussion on [The World Is Flat] | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Thomas Friedman talked about his book [The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century], published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He discussed the successes and discontents of…
Nancy Watson's insight:

The World is Flat has been out awhile. This provides a brief view of the text which sets up many things to discuss

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

This is a good practice.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:41 PM

http://lizardpoint.com/geography/africa-quiz.php

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

A modern day health threat that makes me think of the plague. They didn't know what caused the plague or how to stop it. Wonder when we will figure out how to handle Ebola.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:11 PM

It's almost ironic that the Western World has chosen to wait so long to get involved and now because of it's spread fear has begun that Ebola might travel to the United States. By not sending aid in a timely fashion the US has allowed the virus to grow to a point that now the US finds itself in danger. To make a historical comparison it's almost akin to the Munich Agreements, France and England chose not to stop a growing and dangerous Germany out of fear of conflict only to find war on their door steps because of it. Why did the western world wait so long? Euro-centric bias or racism? Short sightedness? Regardless of the reason the United States and Western Europe are at risk from a nearly untreatable disease primarily through negligence.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:23 PM

This article shows how the Ebola virus began to spread in many of the countries on Africa and how likely the virus will arrive in the United States. The virus has crossed many borders in Africa already and, according to the article, has infected five people in the United States, but has been quarantined and is currently being treated.  The Ebola virus outbreak has shown how ill equipped certain parts of the world are, in terms of, having the necessary tools for combating a deadly disease. For example, the article provides a map that shows the areas in Africa are more infected with Ebola than others, illustrating how certain parts of the country are becoming more susceptible to the outbreak than others. So geographically, the Ebola virus has gone from a regional outbreak into a potentially global epidemic, what with the cases in the United States.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:37 PM

Ebola started in western Africa and it spread overseas to the United States more specifically than any other country. It currently affects over 23,200 people in western Africa. To make sure that Ebola is not being spread throughout the whole United States, eastern United States quarantines any visitors or immigrants from West Africa. Eastern United States seems to have the highest rate of ebola because it is closer to Africa. In that case, it can spread westerly un the United States. Perhaps, it could spread to Canada, Mexico or any other country.

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▶ Humans Need Not Apply - YouTube

Discuss this video: http://www.reddit.com/r/CGPGrey/comments/2dfh5v/humans_need_not_apply/ http://www.CGPGrey.com/ https://twitter.com/cgpgrey ## Robots, Etc...
Nancy Watson's insight:

This is why you need to do your homework and develop your brain to prepare for a high skilled job.

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Globalization II - Good or Bad?: Crash Course World History #42 - YouTube

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:02 PM

Unit 1: Globalization (Key term)

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Illegal immigration by kids to U.S.A.

Illegal immigration by kids to U.S.A. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Data Visualisation by @BBGVisualData. Data Source: US Gov Open Data.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great graph for discussion in migration and political unit. 

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8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist

8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa has one of the youngest and fastest-growing consumer markets in the world.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Africa is a continent to watch. It has the potential to begin an economic break through on a global scale. I used to say watch China. Now I think it is Africa 

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