Mrs. Watson's Class
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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Your kid has no idea where Saudi Arabia – or maybe even South Carolina – is. Here's why.
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Ap Hug to the rescue
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momondo – The DNA Journey

It’s easy to think there are more things dividing us than uniting us. But we actually have much more in common with other nationalities than you’d think. I
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Population,ethnicity - who are we? Where did we come from? Is prejudice learned or inherent?
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Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s

Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Women in their forties are having more babies than women two decades younger for the first time in nearly 70 years, official figures for England and Wales show.
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Population trends are changing as women enter the work force.
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London Should Secede From the United Kingdom

London Should Secede From the United Kingdom | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Beyond the stunning act that has become Britain’s vote to leave the European Union lies a deeper message: Democracy is not destiny, but devolution. Ceaseless entropy — the second law of thermodynamics — applies to politics as well. The more countries democratize, the more local populations seek greater self-rule.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 9:17 AM

In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  Using those ideas, Khanna discusses London's options after the recent Brexit vote in this op-ed (this additional article explores the demographic divide on the Brexit vote, especially how many British Millennials feel that their future has been snatched from them).      

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Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say

Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
It's the latest sign of a rift between the scientific establishment and anti-GMO activists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 10:41 AM

Environmental activists are often frustrated when climate change skeptics do not listen to the scientific consensus that the Earth's climate has changed because of humanity's collective actions.  On the flip side, some environmental organizations, such as Greenpeace, ignore the overwhelming scientific consensus that GMOs are safe for human consumption.  Both have been highly politicized and tap into larger narratives that confirm particular world views.  Most of the opposition to GMOs is not because of the information that is out there, but the fear of the unknown that GMOs illicit.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture, agribusiness.  

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, July 2, 3:42 AM
And then ? Should everyone blindly accept what scientists have discovered ? No opposition for nothing ? This is the end of the humanity if we do so Mr Nobel Laureate.
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Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa

Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The total population in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to grow at a faster pace than in any other region in the decades ahead, more than doubling from 823 million in 2010 to 1.9 billion in 2050. As a result, the two dominant religions in the region – Christianity and Islam – both are expected to have more than twice as many adherents in 2050 as in 2010."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2:58 PM

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the poorest regions of the world. While the economy is growing, the rate at which poverty is falling is less than the population growth rate.  Nearly all of the population growth in Africa between now and 2050 is expected to occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.  As the population grows, the religious dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa will change.  The share of residents practicing Christianity, the majority religion of the region, is expected to decline from 2010 to 2050 while the share of Muslims is expected to increase in the same time frame.  The changes in religious demographics is occurring alongside the region’s youth bulge (click here for a population pyramid).  Understanding religious demographics is key to understanding the challenges faced by the African people.   

 

Question to Ponder: What impact are the region’s two fastest-growing religions having on Sub-Saharan Africa’s overall fertility rate?    

 

Tagsreligionpopulation, ChristianityIslam, Africa.

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Metrocosm - Data Visualization, Maps, and Statistical Analysis

Metrocosm - Data Visualization, Maps, and Statistical Analysis | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Data Visualization, Maps, and Statistical Analysis
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Climate Change Claims a Lake, and an Identity

Climate Change Claims a Lake, and an Identity | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
An indigenous group that survived Spanish and Inca conquest cannot handle the abrupt upheaval of global warming. Lake Poopó was more than their livelihood: It was their identity.
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 11:29 AM
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Bolivian Commuters Soar Through The Sky

"The world's biggest urban gondola system, known as Mi Teleférico, opened in La Paz, Bolivia, in May 2014. The 6-mile-long system is an engineering feat."

 

Tags: transportation, South America, Bolivia, urban, planning, architecture.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 24, 7:53 AM

The importance of services and facilities in connecting people and places to enhance liveability - social connectedness

 

GeoWorld 7

Chapter 7: Liveability Measurement and environmental factors

7.5 Transport: mobile and socially connected

Chapter 10 Enhancing liveability

10.1 Enhancing liveability and sustainability

Geothink: Attributes of a liveable place; New transport hierarchy; Planning liveable places.

 

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 26, 7:14 PM
The gondola system of La Paz, Bolivia called Mi Teleferico,  addresses the transport challenge in a large and unplanned city already overcrowded with vehicles and facing steep terrain. This short video provides a great overview of the creative response to a transport challenge and the background images provide a view of what the city is like.
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France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing

France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The bans on full-body swimsuits are not primarily about protecting Muslim women from patriarchy, but about shielding France’s non-Muslims from a changing world.
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France has fiercely protected many aspects of its culture. In a globalized world, is this creating a centripetal or centrifugal force, or both for them?
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A Proposed New AP Course--AP GIS & T

A Proposed New AP Course--AP GIS & T | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

There is a proposal for a new Advanced Placement course in Geographic Information Science and Technology (AP GIS&T). All U.S. high schools, colleges, and universities are invited to review the proposal by visiting www.apgist.org

AP GIS&T is designed to introduce high school students to the fundamentals of geographic information science and applications of powerful geospatial technologies for spatial analysis and problem solving. 

The AP GIS&T course proposal has attracted broad support from prominent scientific and educational organizations.  For AP GIS&T to become a reality, the AAG needs to collect attestations from 250 U.S. high schools that confirm they have the interest and capacity to offer the course. Similar assurances are needed from 100 colleges and universities that they would be willing to offer some form of credit to students who demonstrate proficiency on the AP GIS&T exam.

High school principals and academic department chairpersons are invited to consider adding their institution to the list of AP GIS&T supporters by completing the brief attestation form at www.apgist.org. Please consider submitting an attestation by October 1, 2016.

Have questions about AP GIS&T? Contact the AAG at ap_gist@aag.org.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:
This is an up and coming career booster for those who are tech savvy and even those who are not!
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CT Blake's curator insight, August 20, 1:56 PM
An awesome opportunity, if offered!
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How To Take Notes In Class: The 5 Best Systems | College Info Geek

How To Take Notes In Class: The 5 Best Systems | College Info Geek | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What's the best way to take lecture notes? Here we'll go over five systems, including the outline and Cornell methods, and one you might have never hear
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Notetaking is intended to make you a better student
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Ecotourism in Australia

Ecotourism in Australia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Ecotourism strives to protect the native cultures and environments of destinations while entertaining and informing tourists of all ages. For many years people within the tourism industry have debated what destinations and practices truly qualify as ecotourism without reaching a definitive consensus."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 5:04 PM

Ecotourism is an important aspect of Australia’s success. The Australian Government produced a website, that is dedicated to the tourism and ecotourism industry.  There is a debate of land claims between the Australian Government and indigenous people. The cultural difference plays a significant role in the success of ecotourism because tourists enjoy the cultural heritage. The separation has created social, political, and economic reasons to be involved or not in ecotourism. The Australian Government has developed certificates and policies to allow aborigines rights of their land.

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentindigenous, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, July 10, 2:46 AM
Ecotourism in Australia
Sally Egan's curator insight, July 18, 9:08 PM
The trend for Ecotourism is presented in this article with questions raised about what practises fulfil the requirements of truly ecotourism. Appropriate to the future directions of Tourism as a global economic activity.
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The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt

The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) is all around us. Yet he is invisible. “Alexander von Humboldt has been largely forgotten in the English-speaking world,” writes Andrea Wulf in her thrilling new biography. “It is almost as though his ideas have become so manifest that the man behind them has disappeared.” Wulf’s book is as much a history of those ideas as it is of the man. The man may be lost but his ideas have never been more alive.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 4:37 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.   

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, July 17, 2:24 AM
The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt
Matthias Henkel's comment, July 23, 2:45 PM
A Man who is still a Brand
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21 charts that explain how the US is changing

21 charts that explain how the US is changing | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The US is a big, complicated place that has undergone some big changes over its 238 years, and even in the last few decades. Here are 21 charts that explain what life is like today in the US — who we are, where we live, how we work, how we have fun, and how we relate to each other.

 

Tags: USA, map, map archives. 


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Ms.Bright's curator insight, July 9, 10:21 AM
Unit II
Michael Harding's curator insight, July 11, 7:22 PM

A really challenging set of charts from the US. 


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The Next America

The Next America | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time
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All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map

All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015. Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people. Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. […]
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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."


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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:57 AM

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 22, 9:41 AM

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 9:53 PM
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Ecotourism in Australia

Ecotourism in Australia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Ecotourism strives to protect the native cultures and environments of destinations while entertaining and informing tourists of all ages. For many years people within the tourism industry have debated what destinations and practices truly qualify as ecotourism without reaching a definitive consensus."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 5:04 PM

Ecotourism is an important aspect of Australia’s success. The Australian Government produced a website, that is dedicated to the tourism and ecotourism industry.  There is a debate of land claims between the Australian Government and indigenous people. The cultural difference plays a significant role in the success of ecotourism because tourists enjoy the cultural heritage. The separation has created social, political, and economic reasons to be involved or not in ecotourism. The Australian Government has developed certificates and policies to allow aborigines rights of their land.

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentindigenous, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, July 10, 2:46 AM
Ecotourism in Australia
Sally Egan's curator insight, July 18, 9:08 PM
The trend for Ecotourism is presented in this article with questions raised about what practises fulfil the requirements of truly ecotourism. Appropriate to the future directions of Tourism as a global economic activity.
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momondo – The DNA Journey

It’s easy to think there are more things dividing us than uniting us. But we actually have much more in common with other nationalities than you’d think. I
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For the culture unit 
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