Mrs. Watson's Class
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Bolivian Commuters Soar Through The Sky

"The world's biggest urban gondola system, known as Mi Teleférico, opened in La Paz, Bolivia, in May 2014. The 6-mile-long system is an engineering feat."

 

Tags: transportation, South America, Bolivia, urban, planning, architecture.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 24, 7:53 AM

The importance of services and facilities in connecting people and places to enhance liveability - social connectedness

 

GeoWorld 7

Chapter 7: Liveability Measurement and environmental factors

7.5 Transport: mobile and socially connected

Chapter 10 Enhancing liveability

10.1 Enhancing liveability and sustainability

Geothink: Attributes of a liveable place; New transport hierarchy; Planning liveable places.

 

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 26, 7:14 PM
The gondola system of La Paz, Bolivia called Mi Teleferico,  addresses the transport challenge in a large and unplanned city already overcrowded with vehicles and facing steep terrain. This short video provides a great overview of the creative response to a transport challenge and the background images provide a view of what the city is like.
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car. 

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:39 PM

I remember reading that this was the original location for where the canal to connect the Pacific and Atlantic was going to be, but the technology available at the time made it impossible for the plan to be set into motion. It would be interesting to see if it can be done, as there is a variety of environmental factors at play that would make its construction complicated. I bet the venture would be very profitable for the nation's government, but I doubt that much of this work would end up helping the Nicaraguan people, and it would irreversibly alter the geographic landscape of the surrounding area. I would also be interested to see how the US would react to its construction. China is our biggest economic competitor and not an explicit ally of our's, so I wonder how comfortable the government would be with a Chinese firm exerting so much influence over a region that is very much in our own backyard. Its construction would have a number of political, economic, social, and cultural consequences, not only for Nicaragua, but for Central America and the US as well.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.
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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 8:51 PM
unit 6
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:19 AM

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Nancy Watson's insight:

Communication and social media. 

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Tysa Fennern's curator insight, June 2, 2013 5:07 PM

Birds of a Feather...tweet together.

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 1:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

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Are Silicon Valley's Employee Shuttles Bad for San Francisco?

Are Silicon Valley's Employee Shuttles Bad for San Francisco? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The city's parallel transportation network, invented by companies like Facebook, Google and Apple, could be creating unforeseen consequences.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting geographic look at industrial use of private coaches (busses) for Silicon Valley. Applies to the Urban and Economic units.

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Recycling Steel

Recycling Steel | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.


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▶ Incredible Video Shows All Roads, Air, and Shipping Routes on the Entire Planet - YouTube

A week of ship traffic on the seven seas, seen from space. Get a glimpse of the vibrant lanes of goods transport that link the continents. The vessel movemen...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic Unit. Trade by roads, air, shipping in 3 minutes from the Industrial Revolution to Globalization.

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Solar Roadways


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Nancy Watson's insight:

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 8, 2014 12:12 AM

I'm sure a few of you have already seen this viral video and it should be intriguing to geographers for a variety of reasons (and not just because we love hexagons). Solar Roadways is a project in its infancy, but they have broad ambitions that would be revolutionary.  Roads that would produce energy?  The idea would have staggering results, but there are some practical reasons why this hasn't already been implemented.  A geographic perspective is critical as we plan for the future.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would the full implementation of this idea restructure the cultural landscape, urban environments and our cultural ecology?  What would some advantages be?  This video is a promotional video that emphasizes the positive; what drawbacks, limitations and obstacles are there to solar roadways in the future?  


Tags: transportation, technologyenergysustainability, planning, video.

Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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The Right Move - Geography of Logistics

The Right Move - Geography of Logistics | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great lesson with awesome graphics of the commodity chains for chocolate, milk, sugar.

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This Future Map Of The United States Is Way Cooler Than Any Current Map Of The United States

This Future Map Of The United States Is Way Cooler Than Any Current Map Of The United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Give me one good reason we shouldn't build this?
Nancy Watson's insight:

Futuristic? High Speed rail travel

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Utah Geographic Alliance's curator insight, December 9, 2013 8:00 PM

I can't wait to see this reality it's long overdue. right now it takes half as long to drive than to ride the train in many areas.

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Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 11, 2013 1:00 PM

Essay #3 for the AP Human Geography 2013 exam focused on how railroads and highways impacted the size and form of U.S. cities.  Andy Baker, one of the great readers on that question has put together an interactive map filled with tangible examples of how Indianapolis' land use history has been heavily influenced by the railroads and highways.  This would be a great resource to prepare students to answer that FRQ. 


Tags: transportationurban, models, APHG.

Ally Greer's comment, June 11, 2013 1:58 PM
This brings back memories from when I took this in high school!
Andy Baker's comment, June 17, 2013 4:03 PM
Thanks for "scooping" this. When I click the link, it takes me to the Google home page. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=215141888958669508744.0004bb9c881395bd56662&msa=0&ll=39.772659,-85.940552&spn=1.06603,2.364807
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Replanning Downtown LA

Melani Smith is Director of Planning and Urban Design at downtown Los Angeles based Meléndrez, a landscape architecture, urban planning, and urban design firm. Melani’s…

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 10:08 PM

Changes are afoot to make Downtown LA (the center of a metropolitan area that is notoriously tied to freeways and the private automobile) more walkable and reshape the look and feel to make it more of a neighborhood.  


Tags: Los Angeles, transportation, AAG, urban, planning.

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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

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geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see: http://cee.mit.edu/news/releases/2012/airport-disease-contagion-model


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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


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