Mrs. Watson's Class
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High Steaks Trade

High Steaks Trade | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:

If you can get past the not so elegant picture of this cow, this article talks about the rising call for beef in societies that formerly did not eat beef. Shipping containers make producing beef on one continent and consuming it on another continent a very real possibility.

Note: Not sure why the photo is of a holstein dairy cow, not usually considered a beef breed.

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▶ Incredible Video Shows All Roads, Air, and Shipping Routes on the Entire Planet - YouTube

A week of ship traffic on the seven seas, seen from space. Get a glimpse of the vibrant lanes of goods transport that link the continents. The vessel movemen...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic Unit. Trade by roads, air, shipping in 3 minutes from the Industrial Revolution to Globalization.

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Nixon And Kimchi: How The Garment Industry Came To Bangladesh

Nixon And Kimchi: How The Garment Industry Came To Bangladesh | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The business that transformed the nation is the product of an obscure but hugely influential trade deal — and a cultural struggle over Korean food.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Background on the Planet Money Tshirt story

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Aboard a Cargo Colossus

Aboard a Cargo Colossus | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest container ships, longer than the Eiffel Tower is high, are a symbol of an increasingly global marketplace. But they also face strong economic headwinds.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Cargo containers have hanged global trade

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo

The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With
modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at
the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris
Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of
multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the
world's major settlements, thread by thread.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Trade routes and methods change over time, but create many of the same effects - cultural exchange.

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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41

Look at Crash Course poster #2: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse In which John Green teaches you about globalization, a subject so epic, so, um, global, it r...
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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Work on Panama's massive $5 billion Third Locks project is nearly complete.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic init, globalization

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Mapping Freight: The Highly Concentrated Nature of Goods Trade in the United States

Mapping Freight: The Highly Concentrated Nature of Goods Trade in the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Considering the importance of goods trade in the United States, strikingly little is known about which regions trade with one another. This information gap limits the country’s ability to coordinate freight policies and investments. To address this deficiency, Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane analyze domestic and international goods trade data from 2010 in this report.
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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:30 AM

Not much is known about which regions trade with one another in the United States. This information gap limits the country’s ability to coordinate freight policies and investments. This article uses data from 2010 and organizes it into charts that clearly show which regions trade with one another and may help policies to be more effective.

 

This article is related to industrialization and economic development through the patterns of trade and how these charts depict the development of the economic system as it expanded in trade and bulk across the country and across the globe. The article also explains some of the laws of trade across cities and regions of the United States.

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How containerization shaped the modern world - Sir Harold Evans

How containerization shaped the modern world - Sir Harold Evans | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove Malcom McLean, a small-town truck driver, to invent the shipping container. Containerization was born, and it transformed the modern global economy.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Containerization 

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Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food

Seeing Seoul: Museums, temples, markets and excellent food | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Exploring the historic and old-fashioned side of Seoul along with the ultra-modern side of the South Korean capital.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Visiting Seoul is a cultural experience like no other. The food, the smells, the skyscraper buildings beside palaces, and centuries of history and pride in the long and beautiful history of S.Korea. The city (and the country) are surprising to Westerners for their modern, safe, and welcoming atmosphere

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8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist

8 Key Facts About Africa - The Globalist | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Africa has one of the youngest and fastest-growing consumer markets in the world.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Africa is a continent to watch. It has the potential to begin an economic break through on a global scale. I used to say watch China. Now I think it is Africa 

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