Mrs. Watson's Class
26.0K views | +4 today
Follow
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting discussion

more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 20, 2015 12:03 AM

This idea that women do not have human rights takes place in Saudi Arabia. What this poster is saying is that women are sweet creatures metaphorically just like candy. As you can see on the right, the candy is wrapped and covered just like the woman covered in a hijab and on the left, the candy is unwrapped and it shows the exposure of the woman and her features. Saudi Arabia has a strict rule about women being covered up and not exposing themselves to the outside world just like the image on the right.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 26, 2015 12:19 AM

This poster/advertisement raises many questions. Having discussed it in detail during class it left me with a few questions and comments. One is whom created this poster? Two, where was this poster advertised? Three, its an extremely original piece of propaganda which passes judgement on woman and the way they are to live. Four, as discussed in class, the color green is a dominant "true" Islamic color. But what's also interesting is that the preferred character of women is on the east side of the poster while the scandalous-less preferred- woman is on the west side. Western influence in a middle eastern Islamic region is not quite received with open arms... Its almost saying Arab women should stay true to Islam and cover themselves. Women whom are influenced by western culture have lost there way and are damaged goods that no true man of Islam would want to pursue. 

This piece of propaganda has many layers to it. Although I personally am not too keen on the message it is an interesting and creative "piece" to say the least. Its too bad it is used to label and even dehumanize women.  

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 9:37 PM

Im sure this poster was highly offensive to many people in the middle east, both male and female.  There is a lot of meaning in each picture, but the basic point seems to be that the image on the right is the way that a lady is supposed to dress, the way that is more appropriate.  Conservative with the candy wrapped, it shows that a woman should dress and act a certain way, while the other image has a girl, who appears to be naked with her hair blowing around, who looks like she has no values, or respect for her religion.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Communication and social media. 

more...
Tysa Fennern's curator insight, June 2, 2013 10:07 PM

Birds of a Feather...tweet together.

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 2:00 PM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 6:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 10:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 10:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.


Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?


Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:57 PM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 10:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.

morgan knight's curator insight, October 8, 2014 6:00 PM

Before reading this article, I assumed that I was capable of telling fictional from factual information apart. But now, after having my eyes opened, I realize that the internet can truly play you like a puppet. From this article, I've now learned that there are more ways than one to judge the authenticity of a site. one such way is to search for an "original" copy of whatever it may be that you're researching. If none pop up, you have the true article.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 6:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 15, 2012 2:29 AM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 15, 2012 2:29 AM
thanks for this! we have shared!