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Mrs. Watson's Class
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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Mrs. Watson's Class |

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

About 1/7 of the world population lives on $1 a day (or LESS)

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class |
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

Via Seth Dixon
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:18 AM


Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Mrs. Watson's Class |

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).

Via Seth Dixon
Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.


This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Mrs. Watson's Class |
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

Via Tony Hall, Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:48 AM

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's comment, May 24, 2013 11:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.

Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 


Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 

Via Seth Dixon
Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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The Authoritative Map

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie "Pooh's Grand Adventure," the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map. 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable?  


Tags: mapping, perspective, K12, video. 

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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Replace Fear of the Unknown with Curiosity

Replace Fear of the Unknown with Curiosity | Mrs. Watson's Class |

This embodies what geography education is all about...

Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Mrs. Watson's Class |
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.

Via Seth Dixon
Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:55 PM

Showing the distribution of Islam around the world. Outside of the middle east, Indonesia has the most Muslims. This religion is one of the fastest growing in the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 4:46 PM

This article was good to look at because the majority of people assume Muslims are only in the Middle East. There are 1.6 billion Muslims around the world. Two-thirds of the Muslim population live in the Asia-Pacific region than in the middle east. More Muslims actually live in India and Pakistan. Muslims make up the majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. Islam has become the world's second largest religious tradition after Christianity. I would love to know some reasons behind why certain Muslims live in other areas. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 4:33 PM

This interesting map/infographic shows where Muslims are concentrated around the world. What I found most interesting and a little bit counterintuitive was that the highest number of Muslims is found in the Asia- Pacific region rather than in Northern Africa or the Middle East. When you consider how large Indonesia's population is, however, and the fact that more than three-quarters of it identify as Muslim, it makes a bit more sense. What is really staggering is the fact that there are an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making nearly a quarter of the global population Muslim. 


What this map shows is the ability of religion to transcend political, economic, and cultural borders. Though Islam is a religion with its origins in the Middle East, it has grown and spread across the world to now have adherents on every continent. Of course, Islam is not the only major religion to have accomplished this feat, but it is particularly important to keep in mind considering the fear and criticism with which Islam has been met in recent years. People tend to think of Muslims as uniformly extremist advocates of violence who wage holy wars no matter the cost. This is, of course, untrue and characterizes the kind of dangerous stereotyping that occurs in regards to many different religions. While this map seeks to show numbers and percentages, it also shows that there are many, many more Muslims in the world than the extremists highlighted in the news and that Islam is not defined by these radicals. 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | Mrs. Watson's Class |

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.

morgan knight's curator insight, October 8, 2014 1:00 PM

Before reading this article, I assumed that I was capable of telling fictional from factual information apart. But now, after having my eyes opened, I realize that the internet can truly play you like a puppet. From this article, I've now learned that there are more ways than one to judge the authenticity of a site. one such way is to search for an "original" copy of whatever it may be that you're researching. If none pop up, you have the true article.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | Mrs. Watson's Class |

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 


Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:25 PM

This was interesting to read because I don't associate the two till I can visually see it.  Then to further call it Eurasia makes sense as well.  There is a population that are considered Asian Russians.  I did a study on this culture and I couldn't believe there were Asian Russians. This sounds crazy.  It would make sense for cross cultures in this region.  

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

So God Made a (Latino) Farmer

A different perspective of Paul Harvey's "God made a Farmer." In reference to the foreign-owned Chrysler Corp. that showed a similar video that aired during ...

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:32 PM

As a cultural production this is fascinating reshaping of the original Chrysler Super Bowl commercial.  The original doubles as a tribute to a rural America of yesteryear and American labor.  This one acts as a critique on the status on Latino workers in the United States.  The audio is the same, with images that conjure out entirely different messages (here is an irreverent parody). 

Tags: agriculture, labor, rural, unit 5 agriculture, perspective.

Anne McTavish's comment, February 7, 2013 1:56 PM
One more version, showing agribusiness owners, would round this set out. These two together are great. Congratulations to Isaac Cubillos for this thouhtful version of "farmer."
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | Mrs. Watson's Class |

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 

Via Seth Dixon
melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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2012 TED Prize Winner – The City 2.0

2012 TED Prize Winner – The City 2.0 | Mrs. Watson's Class |

"The City 2.0 is the city of the future… a future in which more than ten billion people on planet Earth must somehow live sustainably.  The City 2.0 is not a sterile utopian dream, but a real-world upgrade tapping into humanity’s collective wisdom."


What do you see as the best forms of urban patterns for sustainable development in the future?  How could rethinking the city help rethink society? 

Via Seth Dixon
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