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Mapping the Way to a More Equal World

Mapping the Way to a More Equal World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Inequality isn't just about money. It's also about information. The lack of reliable data about developing countries makes things like development work and disaster relief much harder.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 4:54 PM

There is 'mapping inequality' throughout the world; poorer countries often don't have comprehensive census information and geospatial data.  Crowd-sourced mapping is seeking to change and improve geographic awareness, especially in moments of crisis.  For example the maps of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea were essentially blank at the beginning of the Ebola outbreak but that glaring need meant volunteers were using geographic tools to improve developmental situations by providing more information.


Tagspodcast, disasters, mapping, cartography.

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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:57 AM

Click here to see a higher resolution version of this map (don't dismiss it as just a cartoon!).  


Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

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Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail

Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Department of Commerce just lifted a ban on satellite images that showed features smaller than 20 inches. The nation's largest satellite imaging firm, Digital Globe, asked the government to lift the restrictions and can now sell images showing details as small as a foot. A few inches may seem slight, but this is actually a big deal.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Is this a violation of privacy?

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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, July 26, 2014 1:10 AM

 

Une concurrence redoutable pour les drones d'observation et de guidage. Avec quelques questions sur les dérives potentielles (donc probables) en matière de vie privée...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:58 PM

APHG-U1

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:03 PM

Unit 1

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

It seems that claims are often made to reinforce political claims. conflicting claims are difficult to resolve 

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:12 PM

(East Asia topic 2)

The aggressive stance which China is seen as taking towards its oceanic claims can be tied closely with its lack of a mainland frontier. Having no where else to go westward, the only other option is apparently to go very-outward into the south and east. The fact that there is virtually no land in this region is a mute point due to the huge resources which lie under the ocean's surface.

   This action taken by China seems to eerily represent actions of the United States around 70 years ago; once the western frontier had been settled and firmly claimed, the desire to continue expansion can be seen through the U.S.'s involvement with Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, Midway Island, and the like. Though there may have been the use of war as a reason to do this in the case of America, the nationalistic desire for expansion can clearly be seen. European powers, which have especially been short on land frontiers, certainly have exhibited the same traits in history.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 22, 2014 9:46 PM

This new map of China, not surprisingly produced by China, may not look any different than the maps you see now, until you notice the dashed lines in the South China Sea.  These lines are meant to outline the area of Chinese territory.  They have also claimed, which has turned up as false, that they had ancient claim to this area.  This wouldn't be such a big deal except the fact that there are oil reserves in the area in which China has marked its claim.  Not only would this specific area become a new resource for China but also the international waters that they have greatly increased for themselves.  With China's new claim to this area in the South China Sea they have expanded the area that they control as well as gaining a great deal of international water that they would have drilling rights to.  This has neighboring countries up in arms for good reason.  China is trying to take over land that isn't theirs with no validity solely for the oil claims.  Although they are controlling the area in which they have staked a claim on, the courts could soon make sure this isn't happening.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:50 PM

The new map published by the Chinese government is a clear message of what they feel are their territorial boundaries. In areas that are contested between China and other countries, the map makes a bold claim that these areas belong to China. Chinese activities in these disputed areas match up with the attitude conveyed by this map.

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Mapping 22 Different Latino Populations Across the U.S.A.

Mapping 22 Different Latino Populations Across the U.S.A. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
New maps show the geographic differences among Mexican, Salvadorean, Cuban, and other ethnic populations.
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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

John Slifko's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:23 PM

Increasinglly the historiography of Freemasonry will be mpaced by he discipiine of historical geogrphy combining empirical data, place and narrative drama and code. 


Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:03 PM

Good old Common Core.

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

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Diagon Alley in Google StreetView

Diagon Alley in Google StreetView | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2013 9:15 PM

If you can't go to London and take the Warner Bros. studio tour, this is the next best thing: Diagon Alley in Street View.  This is some mapping to inspire your Harry Potter fans and possibly tie some English Language Arts will geospatial tools. 


Tags: mappinggoogle, funvirtual tours, EnglishLondon.

Maegan Anderson's comment, July 11, 2013 2:59 AM
This is interesting. Wish I could get there. :)
trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:55 AM
nice
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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:16 AM

I chose this scoop because the title "Not All English is the Same" really stuck out at me. It made me think back to the other article I did on 107 regional slang words. This article was about accents and that everyone pronounces everything differently depending on where you are located in the world. In the main map being shown, they ask the question "What do you call a miniature lobster that one finds in lakes and streams?" A majority of the United States calls it a crawfish, represented by the color red. Another portion calls it a crayfish, represented by the color green. A few people call it a crawdad which is shown in blue and some people just have no word for something that fits this description. It was interesting to see that most of the places that called it a crawfish are located down the Eastern border of the US, with the exception of the scattered states. The people that called it a crayfish are mostly located in the middle of the US and the people who classify it as a crawdad are mostly located in the Northeast.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

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3 Ways to Make Compelling Maps

3 Ways to Make Compelling Maps | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What makes a good map?  How can we tell what makes a good map?


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SchoolandUniversity's curator insight, June 1, 2013 1:45 AM

http://bit.ly/11hvYJo

 

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, June 1, 2013 7:08 AM

Maneras de hacer a los mapas más expresivos y convincentes

Jye Watson's curator insight, June 23, 2013 10:24 PM

Mapping tips

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


Via Seth Dixon
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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 5:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:01 PM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Great resource for the religion unit.

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CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Both History and Geography explained in these maps

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 9:53 PM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, February 8, 3:41 AM

A great collection of maps - although because they are on a pop-culture website, it might be worth downloading and then referencing them in class. 

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 2014 11:28 AM

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:39 PM

This link is great. So many insightful videos. The one that we saw in class on the nuances of what makes up the UK was very interesting and fun to watch. The UK is a good example on how different geographies exist within the same "borders". In the UK there are many cultures, ethnicities, and politics that work together to make up a nation of nations. The historical scope of the British empire has led to many people around the world having shared connections through their shared past.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, October 5, 2013 10:43 AM

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:15 PM

Personally I think Gerrymandering is unfair and should not be allowed, because it gives a political party to much of an advantage over the other. It really is of no surprise that our government finally shut down. By packing certain states and restructuring districts to create more of an advantage for your political party is corrupt. How are we supposed to run a successful government when we are altering districts and packing districts to favor a certain party? That is unfair and shouldn't be allowed. After all these years we should have some system in place to make government election as fair as possible. But by allowing parties to set different districts we will never reach that point. Gerrymandering is destorying our government, and we can see that from the most recent government shut down. There needs to be some changes made. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 14, 2:10 PM

Unit 4 but used in class-- cannot be used for scoop it summary activity!

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Population Density

Population Density | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.


Via Seth Dixon
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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Communication and social media. 

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Tysa Fennern's curator insight, June 2, 2013 5:07 PM

Birds of a Feather...tweet together.

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 1:35 PM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

Via Tony Hall, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:48 AM

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's comment, May 24, 2013 11:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

The UN Millenium Goals include gender equity and gender empowerment. The  goals are set to be achieved by 2015.

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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:22 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the political outlook of Womens' rights across the world where the yellow is where women have the right to vote, grey is where women have the right to stand for election and black is where the first women were elected recently.

 

This map relates to unit 1 because it is an example of a reference map because of the data it shows and is a very precise version of a formal region because of its commonality between regions. It also shows a spread of hierarchical diffusion through wealthier countries