Mrs. Watson's Class
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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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London Should Secede From the United Kingdom

London Should Secede From the United Kingdom | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Beyond the stunning act that has become Britain’s vote to leave the European Union lies a deeper message: Democracy is not destiny, but devolution. Ceaseless entropy — the second law of thermodynamics — applies to politics as well. The more countries democratize, the more local populations seek greater self-rule.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 2016 9:17 AM

In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  Using those ideas, Khanna discusses London's options after the recent Brexit vote in this op-ed (this additional article explores the demographic divide on the Brexit vote, especially how many British Millennials feel that their future has been snatched from them).      

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High Steaks Trade

High Steaks Trade | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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If you can get past the not so elegant picture of this cow, this article talks about the rising call for beef in societies that formerly did not eat beef. Shipping containers make producing beef on one continent and consuming it on another continent a very real possibility.

Note: Not sure why the photo is of a holstein dairy cow, not usually considered a beef breed.

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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Work on Panama's massive $5 billion Third Locks project is nearly complete.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic init, globalization

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▶ Worlds Biggest Ship:Emma Maersk(full documentary)HD - YouTube

Emma Mærsk is the first container ship in the E-class of eight owned by the A. P. Moller-Maersk Group. When launched in 2006 she was the largest container sh...
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Economic Unit. First 5-7 minute clip shows how and where container ships travel.

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China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies

China’s Pork Feeds People And Economies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
More than half of the world's pigs are in China. We look at what growing industrial pork production means for China and the world.
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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo

The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade - Shannon Harris Castelo | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
With
modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at
the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris
Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of
multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the
world's major settlements, thread by thread.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Trade routes and methods change over time, but create many of the same effects - cultural exchange.

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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41 - YouTube

Nancy Watson's insight:

Globalization 

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:01 PM

Unit 1 Globalization

(Key term)

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 8:51 PM
unit 6
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:19 AM

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:48 AM

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

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Container shipping: the world in a box - FT Business - Companies & Management Video - FT.com

Container shipping: the world in a box - FT Business - Companies & Management Video - FT.com | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 2016 11:29 AM
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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 4:31 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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▶ Incredible Video Shows All Roads, Air, and Shipping Routes on the Entire Planet - YouTube

A week of ship traffic on the seven seas, seen from space. Get a glimpse of the vibrant lanes of goods transport that link the continents. The vessel movemen...
Nancy Watson's insight:

Economic Unit. Trade by roads, air, shipping in 3 minutes from the Industrial Revolution to Globalization.

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Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world?

Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"K-pop sensation Psy was everywhere once but little has been heard since. What happened to him?  Having earned an estimated $55m (£36m) from his work in the West, Psy is now racking up similar amounts from the lucrative Chinese market, where his collaboration with world-class pianist Lang Lang is currently producing a run of consecutive number ones. Psy's decision to focus on the Asian music market may be an indication of where the entertainment industry turns over the highest profits for musicians."


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Nancy Watson's insight:

Pop culture - after Gangnam Style

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2015 6:17 PM

In 2012, we were analyzing the cultural geography of a viral sensation, that seemed to fizzle out so we dismissed it as a one-hit wonder.  So often we assume that being culturally and economically viable in the West is of greatest importance, but truly savvy brands aren't sleeping on East Asian markets.  This "one-hit wonder" in the West strategically moved on to even larger markets. 


Tags: popular culture, diffusion, globalization, culture, music

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Aboard a Cargo Colossus

Aboard a Cargo Colossus | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest container ships, longer than the Eiffel Tower is high, are a symbol of an increasingly global marketplace. But they also face strong economic headwinds.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Cargo containers have hanged global trade

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Globalization II - Good or Bad?: Crash Course World History #42 - YouTube

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:02 PM

Unit 1: Globalization (Key term)

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:39 PM

I remember reading that this was the original location for where the canal to connect the Pacific and Atlantic was going to be, but the technology available at the time made it impossible for the plan to be set into motion. It would be interesting to see if it can be done, as there is a variety of environmental factors at play that would make its construction complicated. I bet the venture would be very profitable for the nation's government, but I doubt that much of this work would end up helping the Nicaraguan people, and it would irreversibly alter the geographic landscape of the surrounding area. I would also be interested to see how the US would react to its construction. China is our biggest economic competitor and not an explicit ally of our's, so I wonder how comfortable the government would be with a Chinese firm exerting so much influence over a region that is very much in our own backyard. Its construction would have a number of political, economic, social, and cultural consequences, not only for Nicaragua, but for Central America and the US as well.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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The geography of food

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Globalization I - The Upside: Crash Course World History #41

Look at Crash Course poster #2: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse In which John Green teaches you about globalization, a subject so epic, so, um, global, it r...
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