Mrs. Watson's Class
30.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Do Rivers Curve?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

The supercontinent Pangaea, with its connected South America and Africa, broke apart 200 million years ago. But the continents haven't stopped shifting -- the tectonic plates beneath our feet (in Earth's two top layers, the lithosphere and the asthenosphere) are still traveling at about the rate your fingernails grow. Michael Molina discusses the catalysts and consequences of continental drift.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:03 PM

Plate tectonics have alot to do with the world and how the world will evolve and in which way it will tranform in specific places. Pangaea involves not only Africa but also South America and how they broke away from the rest of the contenents about 200 million years ago. This idea involves the reality that the continents never stop shifting and the top two layer's of the Earth still grow at the rate of our finger nails grow. Divergent and Convergent boundries are apparent in the Earths ability to shift and eith come together or dive apart.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 26, 2014 4:55 PM

Very interesting that the earth has changed and continues to change. The continents have been separated over time and the example is there as Michael Molina explains that the continents of Africa and South America were once united as they have found remains of dinosaurs in eastern South America and West Africa.

April Howard's curator insight, February 13, 2015 1:36 PM

Visual Explanation of Pangaea and Plate Tectonics